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  1. #1
    Didymus is offline Senior Member
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    Default Pullups: Fast or slow?

    Are there any benefits to a slow, controlled pullup over a fast whip of a pullup? Logically, the faster pullup has a faster acceleration and thus should provide a larger force of resistance. Are there any ideas on this?

  2. #2
    Shank is offline Senior Member
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    Be explosive on the concentric portion, lower yourself under control. Let the resistance take care of speed. Add weight if it is too easy.

  3. #3
    Jordan Vezina RKCTL is offline Senior Member
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    The problem with pull ups is the same as the problem with swings. They look relatively simple, and so many people are doing them wrong. I have been doing pull ups for many years, and just last week Pavel gave me a correction that completely changed how I do them.
    What this is leading up to is that pull ups done with a fast whipping or kipping action leave you zero room for examination and correction. Going more slowly is also a better demonstrator of strength, and therefore a better developer of said strength. Personally I am thoroughly unimpressed by someone getting 30 or 40 'kipping' pull ups. However, someone hitting 20 solid reps with 10 kg. hanging from their belt?
    Also think of Pavel's description of a tactical pull up, I.E. bringing the throat to touch the bar each time vs. just clearing the chin. The former requires a great degree of strength and control. I wouldn't want to see fast, whipping, throat to the bar pull ups.
    From a competition or PR standpoint I would want to go faster, but still under absolute control. While I was in the Marines at Gun School they always told us 'Slow is smooth, smooth is fast.' Meaning that if you try to go fast you'll end up sloppy and disjointed. If you slow down you will have smooth movements that will end up being controlled and perfect.

  4. #4
    rokrat18 is offline Junior Member
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    Going slow is really going to build up your strength a lot more than going fast you can really focus on keeping your shoulders sucked into the sockets which you cant really do when "kipping" As a climber all I ever do is slow and really strict pull-ups

  5. #5
    ZachariahSalazarRKC is offline Senior Member
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    Yes, do both. Period. zzzzzzzzzzzzzz

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