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  1. #1
    sedibald is offline Senior Member
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    Default training right after getting up

    Hi all,

    I'd like to train right after I jump out of bed: more time in the evening to socialize...

    The problem is: it is hard in the morning, heart and back-wise!

    Does anyone of you prefer early morning training? How do you turn on your engine, warm up, motivate yourself, and train efficiently? And finally, do you feel tired during the day?

    I'd appreciate answers on this...

    Regards

  2. #2
    rmbarnes is offline Member
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    Default

    I also do a large portion (but usually not all) of my training straight after getting up. I do this so I have less to do in the evening, and also because if I get it done in the morning, I'm more likely to do it rather than not bothering. I do need to go to be earlier and get up earlier to get more done in the morning though!

    My motivation comes from the thought that even before I turn my computer on at work I've done something good that day already that I can be proud of. I feel it kick starts my day, and while many collegues come in looking like they were only just able to drag themselves out of bed and just managed to get to work on time, I turn up ready to go.

    The main problem is that first thing in the morning I am very stiff and tired. Got to be carefull with my lower back. Also yawning will doing presses is never good.

  3. #3
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    Default

    Since my particular lumbar disc injury, I avoid early morning training like the plague, following the advice from Stuart McGill's work.

    According to McGill, the rehydration process that occurs during sleep renders the discs vulnerable to injury within the first hour of rising, in particular from lumbar flexion (no suprise there, given McGill's general anti-flexion message). From what I gather, age is a factor too - younger people are more vulnerable to disc herniation, older people to disc degeneration. And young men seem to be more prone to disc herniation because they tend to flex through the lumbar spine rather than the hips (the Party rules forbid this of course).

    Having said that, I'm sure that there are lots of forum readers who are resilient enough, or have effective stratergies, to handle spine loading on rising from bed. I'd be interested to hear them myself.

  4. #4
    atf
    atf is offline Senior Member
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    Default mike mentioned a good point

    I also train in the morning at 5:30 and injury free.I follow careful guidelines that I have drawn out for my self. They are too long to discuss here but they include everything from proper warming up to hydration and to drill selection. Please e-mail me at aatifq@hotmail.com and I will lay it out for you properly.Your comments and input will also be appreciated.

    Thanks,

    ATF(Aatif)

  5. #5
    DeviLFisH is offline Senior Member
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    Default

    for me I tired before is hard man !

    at most during afternoon I can

    for weekends if evening time got socialize

    whereas normal workdays weekdays

    after work .

  6. #6
    DeviLFisH is offline Senior Member
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by atf View Post
    I also train in the morning at 5:30 and injury free.I follow careful guidelines that I have drawn out for my self. They are too long to discuss here but they include everything from proper warming up to hydration and to drill selection. Please e-mail me at aatifq@hotmail.com and I will lay it out for you properly.Your comments and input will also be appreciated.

    Thanks,

    ATF(Aatif)
    if I am not wrong do intensive heavy workout early morning is not good actually it harm ur body than good ?

    correct me if I am wrong.

    Is ok and good to do ligh exercise in the morning .
    but for heavy intensive ones better save it during the day

  7. #7
    Raptor is offline Senior Member
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    Default

    I do fast and loose and some super joints in the morning, it takes a bit to warm up the joints and muscles. I work a split shift so my actual practice takes place 10-12 in the am.

  8. #8
    eltriplesix is offline Senior Member
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mike barkess uk View Post
    Since my particular lumbar disc injury, I avoid early morning training like the plague, following the advice from Stuart McGill's work.

    According to McGill, the rehydration process that occurs during sleep renders the discs vulnerable to injury within the first hour of rising, in particular from lumbar flexion (no suprise there, given McGill's general anti-flexion message). From what I gather, age is a factor too - younger people are more vulnerable to disc herniation, older people to disc degeneration. And young men seem to be more prone to disc herniation because they tend to flex through the lumbar spine rather than the hips (the Party rules forbid this of course).

    Having said that, I'm sure that there are lots of forum readers who are resilient enough, or have effective strategies, to handle spine loading on rising from bed. I'd be interested to hear them myself.
    Dose anyone else have more information on this. Or dose anyone agree or disagree with it. Do the z-health guys know anything on the subject. I find the first set of drills from super joints , The Etk warm ups, 120 jumping jacks and ptp or Etk to be something I don't feel write with out. I love doing it as early as poissible. Superjoints and the etk warm ups have you ready to do anything early in the mourning including setting new Pr's.

  9. #9
    Madison Jason is offline Senior Member
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mike barkess uk View Post
    Since my particular lumbar disc injury, I avoid early morning training like the plague, following the advice from Stuart McGill's work.

    According to McGill, the rehydration process that occurs during sleep renders the discs vulnerable to injury within the first hour of rising, in particular from lumbar flexion (no suprise there, given McGill's general anti-flexion message). From what I gather, age is a factor too - younger people are more vulnerable to disc herniation, older people to disc degeneration. And young men seem to be more prone to disc herniation because they tend to flex through the lumbar spine rather than the hips (the Party rules forbid this of course).

    Having said that, I'm sure that there are lots of forum readers who are resilient enough, or have effective stratergies, to handle spine loading on rising from bed. I'd be interested to hear them myself.
    I would also be interested if someone could elaborate on this.

  10. #10
    shmathews is offline Senior Member
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    Default

    I don't remember where, but I believe Pavel advised not to deadlift early in the morning, but to give your back time to wake up.

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