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  1. #11
    powerlifter54 is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by theoldone View Post
    I'm not a swimmer myself, but one of my sons was a state champion in high school and later swam in college at St. Johns University. Unless, they are preparing for a very large meet, coaches want you to swim tired, because you reap the maximum benefit from swimming tired. That is why kids are worked very hard and then begin to taper when approaching a big meet (state championships, national meets, etc). The decrease in workload causes them to swim much faster and really decrease their times.
    Basically what I'm saying is that you have to work very hard to punish the muscles over a long period of time, then taper approaching a big meet. It wasn't unusual for him to swim 12-16000 yards in high school each day during the regular season, and then taper off to < 5000 yards before the state championships.
    You can set PR's during the season by eliminating yardage, but you will plateau after a week or two, and your times will beging to increase, until the workload increases again.
    An interesting topic, to be sure. This is all IMHO, and I have no facts to support my statements, other than being around swimmers and swim coaches for a number of years.
    Not sure i buy this. Training through fatigue doesn't make you faster, not does tapering out of fatigue based form breakdowns. To be fast you have to have very clean technique and a high conditioning level. Yes, tapering is critical, but coaching perfect technique is too. Old school kick their butts only owrks when you have a huge talnet pool or a freaky naturally good kid who excels despite the coaching.

    Frankly, the answer is to understand programming and have a realtionship with the coach. Not a New England or california homosexual marriage or anything but talk to them regularly. They may not do it your way(my son's coaches believe in Power cleans and i suspect support the previously mentioned nuptials) but if they have a sensical plan back off a bit. If it is crazy or dangerous step in. Be aware there are no where near enough youth coaches so you may find yourself a new hobby. Hint:It is easy to get fired if you introduce sled dragging or prowler pushing to kids. Also K-2nd kids love the kettlebells and are drawn to them. Say if you are working out in apark near a school during outside gym classes. Their teachers are not however and will call the principal and the gendarmes. Not that it has happened to me.

    jmo

  2. #12
    vinangkal is offline Junior Member
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    Though my sole daughter is doing the time of her life, I just don't force her to do the warm up and exercises. Since she's still young and below 10 years old, I'll just need to teach her little by little. I will update if in case I do have an update on my observation about warm up. So far no progress yet.

  3. #13
    DrJAG2 is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by powerlifter54 View Post

    Frankly, the answer is to understand programming and have a realtionship with the coach. Not a New England or california homosexual marriage or anything but talk to them regularly. They may not do it your way(my son's coaches believe in Power cleans and i suspect support the previously mentioned nuptials) but if they have a sensical plan back off a bit. If it is crazy or dangerous step in. Be aware there are no where near enough youth coaches so you may find yourself a new hobby.

    jmo
    I coach youth baseball 6 months of the year, so I am very sensitive to talking with the swim coach. I am always willing to listen to suggestions, but I have heard some wild ones. What drives me nuts is the parents who put their 8 year olds in a stance like their favorite player (unless it's Joe Mauer). All kids that age will hit the ball if they are in a comfortable stance with hands at shoulder level. I can tell you right away if an 8 year old is going to make contact or not. The swim coach is a 21 year old college kid - campus stud. Not sure he'd listen anyway, but only one way to find out.

    I do remember the bad old days......static stretching, endless conditioning with no end focused on just wearing you down........ . I'm not sure a kid under 12 is going to benefit from that much conditioning in the first place. I think the time is better spent perfecting technique.

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