The world’s premier network for those seeking to share and discuss high-impact,high results, super practical information for the developmentof superiorphysical performance.
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    TrackStar is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    197

    Default Pullup Form Question

    I'm trying to build up my dead hang pullup numbers to over 20 again after about a year long layoff of not doing pullups. I feel like I have the strength to do more than I can right now (around 14), but for some reason something feels wrong. After about the first 6 which are very clean and not physically taxing, I will start swinging. This isn't the king of swinging also known as kipping that people use to get their pullups numbers over 40. It seems like if anything it just ruins my groove and I have to waste energy resetting. I'm guessing I'm doing something minor on each pullup that just builds up kinetic energy. I also thought I'd add that the bar I have to use for a while is not very tall so I have to lift my legs up behind me.

  2. #2
    kuurakarahka is offline Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Finland
    Posts
    72
    Blog Entries
    54

    Default

    My guess is that your movement might not be synchronous enough after those six clean reps, i.e. that your upper and lower arm do not finish at the same time. If you start the pull with focus on your lats, you can pull the elbows to your sides before the knuckles hit your shoulders. In essence, the motion begins as a row and ends with a curl (to a degree).

    Try zipping up and pulling your elbows down to your hips. It should help you make the motion uniform despite it being a compound one.

    Good luck on building your pullup numbers!

  3. #3
    Cecilia Tom, RKC is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    490

    Default

    Keep your legs forward instead of having them hanging back, and flex your feet. Think of the pull-up as a flexion exercise. If your legs are behind you, you're going into hip extension and you're just leaking strength. Also, while your negatives don't have to be super slow, make sure you lower yourself down with control, stay tight between reps and keep your scapulae down.
    Cecilia Tom, RKC2, CK-FMS, Z Health Level 4, CICS (Indian Clubs)
    Piano Lessons Too!
    San Francisco Level 1 Kettlebell Workshop Saturday, September 18, 3-4:30 PM



    The Mandarin Menace
    Essentials of Elite Performance


    One should never be bored, even in solitary confinement. Get Convict Conditioning!

  4. #4
    p g
    p g is offline Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Gothenburg, Sweden
    Posts
    34

    Default

    Cecilia: I'm sorry if I'm beeing stupid, but how do you mean, flex your feet?

  5. #5
    PeterHuntRKC is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Phoenix AZ-Hawaii Kai HI
    Posts
    886

    Default

    Hello, p_g:

    You are not being stupid at all. Unless you have a good working knowledge of anatomy of movement, this flexion/extension stuff can confuse.

    I am sure Frau Tom will clarify her post for you soon.

    Regards,
    Peter.

    PS: By the way, I recommend this book---Anatomy of Movement by Blandine Calais-Germain. Well worth the study!

  6. #6
    sicklameandlazy is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    220

    Default

    Are you flexing your lower body? Staying tight everywhere? try relaxing your hips, tucking your shoulders in the socket, and flexing your lats while bringing your elbows to your rib cage.

    Try doing slow negatives, or even handstand push ups followed by a pull up. Stick to doing low reps until you figure out the form. I posted an effective 1-5 rep scheme, waiting the same number of minutes between reps as the number of reps themselves. 1 pull up = wait 1 minute
    2 pull ups = wait 2 minutes

    Go to 5 and then come back to 1. After a while you can add weight vest or whatever you choose.

    Good luck. Don't forget to do wrist extensions before and after to save your elbows, wrists and forearms.

  7. #7
    Cecilia Tom, RKC is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    490

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by p g View Post
    Cecilia: I'm sorry if I'm beeing stupid, but how do you mean, flex your feet?
    I should have said dorsi flex your ankle. Usually when I teach lay people if I say flex your feet they understand it to mean push your heels out, pull your toes back. If I want them to plantar flex their ankle, I'd just say point your toes. It's not the most precise thing to say, but most of the time they do what's intended.
    Cecilia Tom, RKC2, CK-FMS, Z Health Level 4, CICS (Indian Clubs)
    Piano Lessons Too!
    San Francisco Level 1 Kettlebell Workshop Saturday, September 18, 3-4:30 PM



    The Mandarin Menace
    Essentials of Elite Performance


    One should never be bored, even in solitary confinement. Get Convict Conditioning!

  8. #8
    GrgMoto is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Santa Monica, CA
    Posts
    145
    Blog Entries
    54

    Default Toes

    Why dorsiflexion? In the fighter pull up program Pavel has his toes pointed in the picture....course things change so just let me know if the form has evolved since then.
    -Greg Wilson

    "Ready. Fire. Aim."

  9. #9
    dpluslane1 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    110

    Default

    Just like Cecelia said, dorsiflex your ankles - it will help you stay tight throughout. We both just returned from the RKC II where we spent a long time studying pullups. Hollow yourself like a gymnast - lifting your feet behind you won't let you get into that tight - almost pike position. One of the points that really helped me was to grip right above your shoulders - not too wide and then pull your elbows back. And if you want to get into really fine points, use one of the Z "tricks" and while keeping your head straight, look up with your eyes until you get to your sticking point, then look down. Eyes up facilitates extension and eyes down facilitates flexion.

    Delaine Ross, RKC II, Z Health Level I

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Free Course
Close