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  1. #11
    jetronin is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by maraton51 View Post
    sorry guys but i just can belive that u are able to walk by kettlebell after few weeks not working with it and not do at least few swinngs or snaches ?!
    I do love barbells and kettlebells but i'm devoting myself to this which means that i'll be leaving my iron alone for a long time.But,iron lasts forever,my kids can have the bars and bells when they grow up

  2. #12
    Karate Pipes is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by jetronin View Post
    I do love barbells and kettlebells but i'm devoting myself to this which means that i'll be leaving my iron alone for a long time.But,iron lasts forever,my kids can have the bars and bells when they grow up
    come on!!!

    By the time your kids are old enough theyll be doing the first stages of CC!!!

    By college time theyll be doing master steps on all the big six and kickin ass and taking names in pretty much any sport they want!

    (And the iron will STILL be rustin away...)

  3. #13
    Jeff is offline Senior Member
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    I plan on combining CC with kettlebell swings, TGU's, Z, and as soon as I develop sufficient joint mobility will do VWC. My strength will come primarily from CC. My primary reason to want to do CC is because I am on the go a lot and can do CC anytime anywhere. But, I have also developed various aches and pains that CC might help alleviate.

    I am also going to try barefoot running. I used to enjoy running about 15 years ago. I could maintain about a 6.5 minute/mile pace, but like a lot of runners I gave it up because of the accumulated wear and tear. I used to have a heavy heal strike. That will change with barefoot running. I miss running, but can live without it. If barefoot running is all it's cracked up to be it will be fun to run again. I figure I can get the basic conditioning I need from kettlebells, and then just need to train the specific muscles in the feet and legs to be able to run.

    I disagree with some of the things CC said about free weights, though. Someone that knows what he is doing can most certainly train squats and military presses without hurting themselves. Actually, some of the things he writes about these exercises would be downright comical if I didn't enjoy training so much. That doesn't take away from the validity of bodyweight training, but no need to bash free weight training that he obviously knows very little about.

    Jeff

  4. #14
    Mr Brady is offline Senior Member
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    My first CC workout was to go through all 6 level one progression standards, yes its a very good thing to start from the beginning. I know that some areas are strong for me and others weak, going through the levels starting at one is very important as it will clearly show your strengths and weaknesses. I had some very sore inner legs after workout one.

    Now i'm moving to Paul's recommended 3x/week program starting at level 2, already knowing that the inverted rows will be tough for me at the req'd volume, but i can see how it builds a foundation, so am in no hurry to avoid the early stuff. Even though the higher levels aren't about volume, the low level volumes set the stage, ingrain the movement patterns, and prepare the system.

    If you are worried about losing anything, there's no reason you can't do the progression standards, and some higher level stuff that you are used to. It might be a real learning experience. If not then you will be up to a level of suitable challenge in no time.

    My own stratagy is if i feel like i need more, do a little of the higher level stuff as a 'practice' but as a program to move through each step as Paul's laid it out.

    What i'm wondering about is how to proceed if the different big 6 exercises get way out of synch with each other.

    My first level 2 workout, no problem with the jack-knife squats, the rows no so good, i used my rings at about shoulder level to get the volume up, but clearly need allot of work there.

    My plan - work my way down, but continue to do GTG pull ups.

    But its easy to see being at level 4 for one exercise and level 7 for another.

    Any thoughts on this?
    Last edited by Mr Brady; 12-27-2009 at 11:46 AM.

  5. #15
    iforwms is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Brady View Post
    But its easy to see being at level 4 for one exercise and level 7 for another.

    Any thoughts on this?
    Is this a problem? I think this is inevitable if you have any history of strength training as you will have already developed your own strengths and weaknesses. Just keep going, and eventually you'll balance out.

  6. #16
    Chris F. is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Brady View Post
    My first CC workout was to go through all 6 level one progression standards, yes its a very good thing to start from the beginning. I know that some areas are strong for me and others weak, going through the levels starting at one is very important as it will clearly show your strengths and weaknesses. I had some very sore inner legs after workout one.

    Now i'm moving to Paul's recommended 3x/week program starting at level 2, already knowing that the inverted rows will be tough for me at the req'd volume, but i can see how it builds a foundation, so am in no hurry to avoid the early stuff. Even though the higher levels aren't about volume, the low level volumes set the stage, ingrain the movement patterns, and prepare the system.
    Did you do the first stage only once and then move on or did you spend a few sessions on it?

    I plan on trying all six in the new year after I finish up some other training requierments in the next week or so. Coming from the yoga background that I do I tried the bridge progression first. If I wanted to, I can do stage 8 and 9 but decided to try stage one and I was amazed at how hard that was. My legs were burning from 150 stage one bridges. A day or so later I tried level two and decided not to do the progression standard--in other words I took it to a "comfortable stop." I think the guy is on to something with the high volume at the beginning to condition joints etc.

    When I first saw the stage one for push ups I chuckled thinking any reasonably fit person can jump right in at stage five. Well, after stage one of the bridge I am humbled. I'm gonna follow this guy but one thing I'm unclear about is how long to spend at each level when it's kinda clear that you could move on. The example for the two guys doing the pushup makes me think that we should spend a month on each stage. Kinda a lot no?

  7. #17
    rickbuzz is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Brady View Post
    But its easy to see being at level 4 for one exercise and level 7 for another.
    If i were to use my current strength level as an example then I am already at the master step for squats working on the intermediate progression but at around step 3 or 4 with handstand pushups. I expect to reach the master progression for squats long long before I ever reach step 10 for handstand pushups. When I do I will focus more on the progressions I am weakest at until I've become strong at all of them.

    What I've been wondering though is how to combine my favorite kettlebell program with convict conditioning, that is to say viking warrior conditioning. I'm thinking of doing the good behaviour routine with a short VWC workout following each of the CC workouts.

    Any thoughts?

  8. #18
    Karate Pipes is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris F. View Post
    When I first saw the stage one for push ups I chuckled thinking any reasonably fit person can jump right in at stage five. Well, after stage one of the bridge I am humbled. I'm gonna follow this guy but one thing I'm unclear about is how long to spend at each level when it's kinda clear that you could move on. The example for the two guys doing the pushup makes me think that we should spend a month on each stage. Kinda a lot no?
    Hum. I guess it varies so much, right? One month of wall push-ups for a strong guy is probably too much. But then, if you could do a stage a month for ALL steps, you could do the master stages all in well under a year, which is way, way to quick to expect to get these moves done.

    I think as a rule of thumb probably break in slowly; 2-4 months until you are at your "limit" stage with great form. To me, the beauty is that after that break-in, you don't need a time-table. You move forwards when u are ready, when you can get the progression standard. If you can get the reps, move up. If you can't, don't. So simple even the average prisoner could understand it! This seems to be the meat of what the coach is pointing to.

    It might take me ten years to do a stand-to-stand, the way my back has started out. It has kinks in places most guys dont have places. But if it does, so what?! A decade well spent

  9. #19
    Mr Brady is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris F. View Post
    Did you do the first stage only once and then move on or did you spend a few sessions on it?

    I plan on trying all six in the new year after I finish up some other training requierments in the next week or so. Coming from the yoga background that I do I tried the bridge progression first. If I wanted to, I can do stage 8 and 9 but decided to try stage one and I was amazed at how hard that was. My legs were burning from 150 stage one bridges. A day or so later I tried level two and decided not to do the progression standard--in other words I took it to a "comfortable stop." I think the guy is on to something with the high volume at the beginning to condition joints etc.

    When I first saw the stage one for push ups I chuckled thinking any reasonably fit person can jump right in at stage five. Well, after stage one of the bridge I am humbled. I'm gonna follow this guy but one thing I'm unclear about is how long to spend at each level when it's kinda clear that you could move on. The example for the two guys doing the pushup makes me think that we should spend a month on each stage. Kinda a lot no?
    One of my yoga teachers told me that his teacher (BKS Iyengar) made him do 109 backbends. He learned how to be efficient in what is a very complicated movement.

    I tried doing 100 drop backs once about 5 years ago, i made it to 50 but my legs were toast for the next few days. I think that there is something different that volume does, but for high volume the strength already has to be there and in control.

    To answer your question, with CC I did stage one once, all 6 in one session. I was just excited to see what the full program was all about in get going. Stage 2 is already a different animal, and i will break it up as Paul suggests, in sets of 2. I'm planning to move forward when i hit a correct and comfortable Progression Standard (PS) set, i've only done one stage 2 practice, the squats were no problem, though the volume made it more of a challenge than i expected.

    The inverted row (he calls Horizontal Pulls), not so easy for me to get the volume with my rings at waist level, so I'll take as long as i need to build that, and carry on to stage 3 with the squats.

    With the H Pulls the first time i did it to the PS volume but it took a few sets to find a height i could do it at. Having some rings really helps with this one. I'm planning to slowly work my way down to the level shown in the book. I think rows are a very important movement anyway so i'm happy to do it.

    I think that even as one progresses the earlier level practices might have something to occasionally revisit, and i think that they should be very worthwhile to learn. As a yoga teacher, i can see tremendous value for the average Joe or Jane in learning these movements.

    Anyway as the previous posters said, its just not going to be even development, no big deal. But i think its good to be working on all six together though i imagine that in real life practice, there will be times we focus one one or two with extra enthusiasm.

    As for building up to the PS, I don't think the intention is to go beyond your comfortable stopping point in ones zeal to move forward. In fact Paul talks about that, how some people will jump in at level 5 make some gains, but because of all the straining wind up quitting. So just like the approach to KB practice, its about making it a practice, and letting time do the job of getting you to move forward. Avoid getting too sore, that has to be one of the greatest things i've gotten from Pavel's approach. I never dreamed that i could do things with weights (ok KBs) and not be sore. Its a real key to being able to continue and stay motivated.
    Last edited by Mr Brady; 12-27-2009 at 02:13 PM.

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