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Thread: Twisted Pelvis?

  1. #1
    porvida is offline Member
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    Default Twisted Pelvis?

    Does anyone have personal experience with twisted hips/pelvis?

    I have noticed over the last year or two that my hips are obviously twisted. If I stand with my feet together, toes on a line, my right hip is far forward of my left hip. My upper and lower body compensate for this. Thus, my feet face forward, my hips face to my left, and my upper body faces forward. I also notice that I always stand with the majority of my weight on my left foot.

    As a result, my lower back often feels like a towel that is being rung out. Six years ago I ruptured a disc at L5-S1. I'm not sure if my pelvis misalignment was the cause or result of this injury. Internet research indicates that many feel misaligned hips cause back problems.

    I have visited a chiro in the past who successfullly straightened me out but only temporarily. Unfortunately, my insurance doesn't cover chiropractic and I can't afford to visit one regularly. Also, it seems the chiro was straightening me out but not addressing the cause of the misalignment.

    I am going to see my doctor on Thursday. However, I am curious to see if anyone has had any experience with this.

  2. #2
    James1974 is offline Member
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    Hey Com Porvida ,

    Yep i have the same thing . which results in me corkscrewing on deads and squats , i was told i have uneven leg lengths and imbalances in hips and thighs and that my body is a twisted mess. my L5 is buggered too apparently and a lot of the facet joints on the right side

    the same as you i get adjusted then it comes straight back. ive been seeing a trigger point therapist which helps with the pain but like you i feel the root of the problem is not being addressed . Maybe like me you need to be assessed by a Z health expert. I plan on it soon.

    Good luck with it

  3. #3
    Bones78 is offline Junior Member
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    Ive recently had to back off my kettlebell swing workouts and am struggling to keep up with squats due to seemingly a very similar thing (Corkscrew!). I was only 10 when i slipped my L5-S1 and had a laminectomy in the same year. I try to keep fit these days(im 31) and it seems to be not my back now but my "hip" (seems to be unilateral) that keeps me from getting where i want to be. I feel it is very similar to your complaints! And other than this observation, i dont have much to offer -except that perhaps there is some persisting low level nerve damage that may;
    a) inhibit muscles that should stabilise the pelvis (chronic pain inhibition or direct)
    b) produce an altered muscle firing pattern (asymetric muscle weakness due to the above? Or general weakness as in '"lower crossed syndrome")
    c) in my case my sciatic nerve "stuck" to the scar tissue caused by the operation making my right leg much less flexible

    Basically for me backing off has been the only option so far (to my disgust) -with anti-inflam drugs to help. Oh and foam rolling and heaps of core work (my quadratus lumborum left side is atrophied!!! -how is that possible with KBs???)

    So please keep posting! Suggestions may keep us training!!!!!

  4. #4
    porvida is offline Member
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    Well I saw my doctor today. At first he said my hips weren't twisted. When I directed his attention to the obvious difference between the right and left sides of my hips he agreed there was a difference. However, he said that he did not necessarily believe my condition was abnormal.

    I explained that a well conditioned 36 year old man shouldn't feel like a towel that is being rung out and that I shouldn't be experiencing pain regularly. He argued that my condition may not be treatable and that it's not something that can just be fixed.

    He finally relented and referred me to physical therapy but I have to call around and find one that specializes in this condition. Needless to say I am switching to a doctor who will be more willing to help.

  5. #5
    johnbeamon is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by porvida View Post
    Well I saw my doctor today. At first he said my hips weren't twisted. When I directed his attention to the obvious difference between the right and left sides of my hips he agreed there was a difference. However, he said that he did not necessarily believe my condition was abnormal.

    I explained that a well conditioned 36 year old man shouldn't feel like a towel that is being rung out and that I shouldn't be experiencing pain regularly. He argued that my condition may not be treatable and that it's not something that can just be fixed.

    He finally relented and referred me to physical therapy but I have to call around and find one that specializes in this condition. Needless to say I am switching to a doctor who will be more willing to help.
    My father was a doctor, and there are some 4 or 5 other medical professionals in my family, so I say this in all humility. Get a second opinion, and don't lose hope. Your symptoms are visible and should be pursued with all vigor. Find a sports medicine clinic or an orthopedist.

    I derived great benefit from studying my body's geometry, that the torso should be a rectangle and that my pelvis should face forward and be parallel to the floor. The Goblet Squat illustrates this, as do a proper swing and some of the standing poses of yoga. If you google "yoga standing poses", there's a simple page at about.com with descriptions and pictures for about a half-dozen positions. When I'm on one leg, hinged over at the hip like a capital "T", I can feel exactly how that leg and hip are trying to stabilize me and work with them consciously. It's not easy, but it's very focused and intentional and diagnostically valuable. That page of exercises can give you something to start with, but by all means pursue a variation of physical therapy. This can be re-trained. You'll notice that your leg is straight, your shoulders are level, but your hip is diagonal, and it gives you a small, focused thing to work on.
    John Beamon

    My thread "Guest User? Really" prompted some 6 pages of discussion on why Pavel's user account had been changed to "Guest User" status. John Du Cane answered in a forthright manner, and I thanked him for his professionalism in this very forum.

    That entire thread was removed from the forum on or around August 26. I've been an HKC and an active, outspoken member in good standing for some 3yrs now, but I don't support this sort of censorship. Look for me on the public web.

    -j

  6. #6
    omnipotentspirit is offline Junior Member
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    Porvida,
    I definately share the same problem that you are suffering from. In my case my left hip is shifting forward. I have had back pain for as long as I could remember. when I am standing straight my upper body twists to the right. This was putting a great deal of pressure on my lumbar and toriac parts of my spine causing stiffness and pain.A word of caution many physicians do not really believe what you have to say. They are stubborn and arrogant. They were just dealing with the symptoms but not the cause and just like in your case i was forceful, then they just referred me to a physical therapist. The physical therapist did not do much either. I finally decided to go to a chiropractor ( oh the physician made me believe i had scoliosis and a generative disease and it was a hopeless case). The chiropractor aligned my back and the pain was gone. However, I still had the problem with the hip which he could not do much.
    Then I discovered sports medicine clinic. My test came back and i have a small tear in the hip joint which caused it to shift forward.Through the years it has caused tightness in the ligaments and muscles of the leg because my body was and is trying to resolve stability problem by forcing my left to shift forward which also affect my shoulder to fall forward. I am doing physical therapy now with the right people and if my issue is not resolved I might just do the surgery, which I hope i dont have to do.

  7. #7
    porvida is offline Member
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    Omnipotentspirit,

    What do mean by a tear in the hip joint? Do you have a tear in the muscle, tendons, ligaments?

    Did they discover the tear in an MRI?

  8. #8
    patdc1 is offline Junior Member
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    I will give you my 2 cents worth. I have always had the same problem as you, with both my pelvis twisted and my head and neck always shifted to the right. First of all, I am a chiropractor and I´ve been adjusted for the last 20 years. I always felt better after being adjusted, but the same problem always seemed to come back. The more I tried to stretch out the muscles, or improve mobility or whatever, it never helped. Honestly in the case of stretching, it actually caused me more pain.

    As a chiropractor I found it kind of disheartening, and even though my body was functioning way better (haven´t had a headache in years, insomnia gone, better sleep and energy, etc, etc). My posture was still JACKED. I had given up on heavy squats and deadlifts.

    About a year ago I got an adjustment that changed my life, a specific upper cervical adjustment. I had to learn this technique, because it changed my posture completely, and within a week every pain and tension had left my body. For the first time that I can remember, my head is on straight, and my posture is great. I have finally regained thoracic mobility, that no amount of Z health, SuperJoints or FMS corrective movements had helped. (That is not a slam on any of those, and I use movements from all of them with my patients).

    It has been my experience that disc problems, thoracic outlet syndromes, upper crossed syndrome, lower crossed syndrome,etc. all have a better prognosis once the upper cervical area is corrected. It is the most mobile area of the spine, the most likely to be misaligned, and the most neurologically important.

    I will give you a biomechanical reason and then a neurological/functional reason.

    First imagine your head as a bowling ball on top of a shot glass on top of a stack of blocks with high tension guide wires, If the bowling ball shifts off center, then the guide wires have tension and strain. Those are analogous to the muscles of the spine-shoulder-pelvis.

    The other mechanism by which this occurs is more neurological in nature. When there is a misalignment to the upper cervical area, it severely affects the blood supply to the brain stem. Most notably the PontoMedullary Reticular formation. The PMRF has lots and lots of super vital functions, but one is to inhibit inhibition of flexor muscles ipsilaterally(on the same side) , functionally raising their tone.

    So what you will often see is in the upper extremity: the shoulder rolled in, tight pecs, weak external rotators prone to strain/sprain, thoracic outlet syndromes. etc., and in the lower extremity: a tight psoas, tight piriformis, possible sciatic nerve involvement, foot flared out, and a functionally short leg producing a twisted pelvis.

    Again, just my 2 cents. It´s not a miracle cure and won´t make an amputee grow a limb back, but for me it has been amazing, and I´m getting very consistent, predictable results with my patients as well. I still work with the whole spine and give exercises and joint mobility/flexibility exercises, but for me the upper cervical is the keystone. After it is corrected all the Z, FMS and pattern work just works better.

    Here is a video explanation: YouTube - what is body imbalance

    Hopefully you find some help and whatever you decide to do, I wish you luck.

  9. #9
    Steve Sisk is offline Senior Member
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    On the issue of upper cervical: YES YES YES. I don't think it precludes the use of other techniques, but if your cervical region is compromised (and from my experience most everybody's is these days), everything below that area is susceptible to misalignment.

    One of the most common forms of cervical misalignment is forward-head syndrome, or kyphosis of the cervical region. This is where your head projects forward in front of your body. Your ears should sit above and behind of your shoulders, and every inch the head drifts toward (due to loss of cervical curve) the load your head places on your spine increases by 10 pounds. This places pathological pressure on the spinal cord and can lead to number of secondary misalignments, even as far down as the pelvis (and beyond).

    Upper cervical work certainly isn't a panacea for pelvic rotation (soft tissue abnormalities may also be an issue, as well as any number of other factors), but it'd be the first thing I'd focus on if you goal is spinal reconstruction. I'd be sure to find a corrective care Chiropractor whose focus will be restoring the natural curves of the spine and not just adjusting you to temporarily relieve pressure from the spine.

    Clear Institute is breaking new ground in spinal correction, and I've had the privilege of talking with Tony Nada, a doctor in central Florida who has been defying the established opinion as to what can be done to in the areas of scoliosis and proper curve restoration.
    Last edited by Steve Sisk; 12-13-2010 at 08:34 AM.

  10. #10
    omnipotentspirit is offline Junior Member
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    Hip labrum tear.
    I did an Arthrogram (filling the gap between the hip joint with a dye which they observe during the MRI) before the MRI.

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