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  1. #11
    Vlad the Impaler is offline Senior Member
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    Tim Ferriss also mentions the vacuum in his book though he calls it a different name and I agree with you Ari about the need for it.

  2. #12
    Steve Freides is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan123 View Post
    Steve: Thanks for telling ne how you delt with your issue. I will ask the physiotherapist what she thinks of deadlifting in my condition. Right now I'm sticking to relatively light weights to reduce internal abdominal pressure and rehabing the hip flexor.

    I'm interested in how your grandfather dealt with inguinal hernias. Did he have surgery then? Or just endured the pain?
    My grandfather wore a truss - if you google "hernia truss" you'll find that it's a garment designed to help with this condition. My father had surgery to repair his several times over the course of his life but none when he was little.

    You may have to look around to find a medical profession who likes deadlifting. I was fortunate - when I hurt my back, my orthopedist told that it was OK for me.

    -S-
    KBNJ.COM - Steve Freides, RKC Team Leader

  3. #13
    Rambodoc is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by AriSuper View Post
    I say it because:
    The transversus abdominus and lumbar multifidus are your inner abdominal musclesAbdominal wall - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. The muscles in question are rarely even tought off let alone trained. They lie beneath the rectus abdominus and ext. obliques. The inner abdominal muscles support your posture and control deep breathing during power production,like deadlifting or over head pressing,you get the picture.They are also responsible for your back support.So,because no one really specifically trains them and they are rarely affected by classic exercises, its becomes imperative to build a stronger inner abdominal wall(In your case especially).This is an old school exercise that the strongmen of old age and OG bodybuilders(B.Hoffman,J.Grimek,C.Atlas and such) knew and practiced.With this exercise I eliminated my back pain, reduce lower back fatigue and improved my Oly.Lifts.

    As for power breathing -
    Pavel says its a great way to avoid hernias and back injuries,PTTP from page 64 to 67
    Avoiding a hernia and managing a weak abdominal wall where a hernia already exists are two different things. Of course, we don't know for sure what our OP actually has, as it doesn't quote a medical report......
    BMI--Fat Loss For Life
    Practising moves (for self-learning) on You Tube: www.youtube.com/thekbdoc

    There is an RKC in every surgeon (like me, as a random example).

  4. #14
    Steve Freides is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rambodoc View Post
    Avoiding a hernia and managing a weak abdominal wall where a hernia already exists are two different things.
    Right, but you need to put parts of those two things together to get back to the OP's question: can managing a weak abdominal wall by strengthening it prevent an inguinal hernia? He said he doesn't have one yet. I am not a doctor, but in light of the fact that strengthening one's abdominal muscles is never a bad thing, anyway, it sounds worth pursuing to me.

    -S-
    KBNJ.COM - Steve Freides, RKC Team Leader

  5. #15
    Shawn M is offline Senior Member
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    Both my brothers also had hernias...mine was repaired before they had the mesh unfortunately. If I do not keep my abs strong I have pain and discomfort in the area...I do "spiderman planks" three times a week and the ab wheel once a week and that keep the area from feeling like it is going to rip....I like the vacuums too, I do them with yoga in the PM. Rambodoc is correct though...if you have a disposition for those pockets and viscera pushing through often the only real fix is surgical intervention with the mesh...there is no tissue there to build up if you have seen the anatomy or what the herniations actually look like.... but strong abs are never a bad thing!

  6. #16
    Steve Freides is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shawn M View Post
    If I do not keep my abs strong I have pain and discomfort in the area.
    This is exactly my experience as well. For those of us with pain in this area, ab strengthening seems to help. Once something has actually ruptured, though, I think we all agree it's a different matter - but if strengthening helps prevent that, power to us.

    -S-
    http://www.kbnj.com

  7. #17
    Jonathan123 is offline Member
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    Hey guys,

    Thank you all for all the answers!

    Just to clear things a bit: I do not have a hernia.
    The surgeon said that to define a hernia you need two existing conditions:

    1: a hole in the abdominal wall.
    2: an inner organ protruding through this hole in the wall.

    I have the first condition. This puts me in a high risk for a hernia.

    I started practicing the breathing exercises today. Ari mentioned there is a description in PTTP but I found them in bullet proof abs too.

    My current program includes: BJJ (no sparring or movements that feel dangerous), Program Minimum (actually the break in plan right now) with a light bell, Power Breathing and Vacuum practice throughout the day and 3-5 method janda situps.

    How would you guys go about stretching in this condition? Which stretches should I avoid? Which are recommended?


    Thank you all so much! Every bit of infomation is helpful!

    Jonathan.

  8. #18
    Steve Freides is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan123 View Post
    How would you guys go about stretching in this condition? Which stretches should I avoid? Which are recommended?.
    Please ask your doctor this question. My guess is that if a particular stretch doesn't hurt, you're OK.

    -S-
    KBNJ.COM - Steve Freides, RKC Team Leader

  9. #19
    AriSuper is offline Senior Member
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    I'd say you could avoid Bridges, and don't push yourself.
    Last edited by AriSuper; 01-26-2011 at 12:34 PM.

  10. #20
    Jonathan123 is offline Member
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    Default Saw the doctor today.

    Turns out my rectus femoris muscle was partially torn off the pelvis and that's where the pain is coming from.
    I need to X-Ray it to see if some of the bone wasn't torn along with the muscle.

    He said it should heal in 4 months and I can do whatever doesn't hurt as much as I want.

    Anyone hear of this condition?

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