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  1. #1
    Chris Hansen is offline Senior Member
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    Default 3x5, 5x3, 54321?

    Is there much difference between doing 3x5, 5x3, or 54321? They all add up to 15 reps in sets of 5 or less, does it really make a difference or is just preference?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    danfaz is offline Senior Member
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    Guess it depends on the weight you are using. You can probably do 5 sets of 3 with a heavier weight than you can do 3 sets of 5 with. You can do 15 singles with an even heavier weight.

  3. #3
    aerospace is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by danfaz View Post
    Guess it depends on the weight you are using. You can probably do 5 sets of 3 with a heavier weight than you can do 3 sets of 5 with. You can do 15 singles with an even heavier weight.
    Also, isn't a ladder (5,4,3,2,1 or 1,2,3,4,5) treated lke a single set? If you did 3X5 you'd do 15 total reps, but if you did 3 ladders to five, you'd be doing 45 total reps. Ladders are a density tool right? I probably couldn't do sets of 15 with some of the weights I do ladders to five with. It allows tou to do more work per set without reaching fatigue, right?

  4. #4
    Philip M is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Hansen View Post
    Is there much difference between doing 3x5, 5x3, or 54321? They all add up to 15 reps in sets of 5 or less, does it really make a difference or is just preference?

    Thanks.
    They're all good options. Why not do them all?
    If you are doing 2-3 lifts then give this a whirl (if you're doing two lifts, do them on the same day. If you're doing three lifts, you may wanna double your gym visits so you can, for example, squat and deadlift one day, and bench the other day.)


    For each individual lift...

    Start with 70% 1RM
    3-4 weeks of 5x3 done 3 times per week, adding 5 or 10 pounds every OTHER workout;
    ==> don't go balls-out in this cycle.

    take one back-off week with much lighter weights; work on your form

    Start again with 70% 1RM
    3-4 weeks of 5x3 done 2 times per week, adding 5 or 10 pounds every SINGLE workout;
    ==> plan to finish the cycle with a challenging weight

    backoff week with light weights; work on form

    Start again with 70% 1RM
    3-4 weeks of 3x5 twice per week with similar weights from your first 5x3 cycle, adding weight every SINGLE workout;
    ==> Try to finish with the same weight that you finished your first cycle with-- you will be handling it for 3x5 instead of 5x3

    backoff week with light weights; work on form

    Then do 3-4 weeks of 54321 performed twice per week, adding 5-10 pounds every OTHER workout
    ==> You should be really pushing it to the limit by the end of the cycle. You should be feeling STRONG by the end of it.

    Then rest a few days and test!

    -------------

    Then, for example, if you are working on three lifts you could dedicate some time to just once per week per lift, followed by assistance/conditioning work

    MON- Squat 5x5. good mornings 3x5. then light high-rep KB swings and burpees for 7-8 min

    WED- Bench 5x5. then military press 3x5. weighted dips 3x6. tricep work 3x8.

    FRI- Deadlift 8x3. then Pullups. Then heavy KB swings for 7-8 min.

    ...the assistance work gets very short rest periods


    the possibilities are endless

    I have read on this site that if you're focusing on two or three lifts, MOST people should perform between 25-50 reps per week, most often with rep ranges between 3-5. So take from it what you will. I try to stick with 3 minute breaks for the main lifts. But for 5x5, Pavel recommends taking as much five minutes. Your choice comrade!
    Last edited by Philip M; 01-28-2011 at 11:22 AM.

  5. #5
    johnbeamon is offline Senior Member
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    Longer continuous sets train fatigue management. Assuming equal time resting after each rung of a ladder, ascending ladders increase tolerance for longer sets. You stop, not when you don't have a single rep left, but when you cannot commit to the entire next rung. Descending ladders add volume, but not long-set tolerance. Sets of 5 train sets of 5, sets of 3 train sets of 3, singles train singles. I found that 1+2+3+4+5 trained me to do 8 straight, but not 15 straight. 8 straight is "5 with a couple in the bank".
    John Beamon

    My thread "Guest User? Really" prompted some 6 pages of discussion on why Pavel's user account had been changed to "Guest User" status. John Du Cane answered in a forthright manner, and I thanked him for his professionalism in this very forum.

    That entire thread was removed from the forum on or around August 26. I've been an HKC and an active, outspoken member in good standing for some 3yrs now, but I don't support this sort of censorship. Look for me on the public web.

    -j

  6. #6
    MI_KB'r is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Hansen View Post
    Is there much difference between doing 3x5, 5x3, or 54321? They all add up to 15 reps in sets of 5 or less, does it really make a difference or is just preference?

    Thanks.
    The only difference is with the weight you are using. As you get closer to your 1 RM, the lower rep per set numbers come into play.

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