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  1. #1
    whiskey is offline Senior Member
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    Default Please, do not laugh

    I discovered (my) new favorite exercise - bodyweight squats !

    No, it's true. I did my portion of barbell squats and I'm not new to training, in general, still I was confused a bit (lately) why nobody seems to do this exercise even people who usually do just BW stuff ?
    Most people do pushups, pullups burpees and what not but not many bodysquats. So after reading article by Bud Jefries here on DD a couple days ago I started thinking and now I started to implement them after my usual workout. Actually it do make sense that before you start running you must learn to walk and I know that many powerlifters who squat big weights would puke after maybe 25 bodyweight squats, how sad is that?

    Today after my snatches I did 50 BW squats and I tell you this stuff is awesome, it even got me sweating. My goal is to do 150-200 reps (one set) at the end of EVERY workout.
    Obviously I won't do this for maximal strength but for conditioning and cool down.

    Anybody who do high reps BW squats on regular basis here ?

  2. #2
    whiskey is offline Senior Member
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    Default

    And yes, I forgot, heres a quick link to DD article which got me thinking ...

    Kettlebell Success - Bud Jeffries

  3. #3
    taikei is offline Senior Member
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    Default

    It's not a laughable issue at all. I do them based on Convict Conditioning routine and I love it. It is challenging to stabilize deep squat with own body weight.

    I do know one of RKC level 2 guy who accomplished two out of three Beast Challenge had body weight squat in his routine.

  4. #4
    whiskey is offline Senior Member
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by taikei View Post
    It's not a laughable issue at all. I do them based on Convict Conditioning routine and I love it. It is challenging to stabilize deep squat with own body weight.

    I do know one of RKC level 2 guy who accomplished two out of three Beast Challenge had body weight squat in his routine.

    I haven't read Convict conditioning. I only have read Pavel's ETK, PTTP and his first kettlebell book actually (KB chalenge).

    So those people who do bodyweight squats - can you tell me what would be good number of reps per set or how they are doing them ?

  5. #5
    cammo is offline Senior Member
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    Default

    Check out David Whitley's Brutal Minimulist Fitness workout on the articles page. You work up to doing 50 get ups then an intense swing/squat workout. It usually takes me about 10 minutes to finish the swings/squats(150 swings and 150 hindu squats). After ROP it's my favorite workout to do.

  6. #6
    mrpeoples is offline Senior Member
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    Default

    How can you stand such unreasonably high repititions? I understand if its with swings and especially with snatches but even then it kinda gets to me.

  7. #7
    johnbeamon is offline Senior Member
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mrpeoples View Post
    How can you stand such unreasonably high repititions? I understand if its with swings and especially with snatches but even then it kinda gets to me.
    Not unreasonable, high. Keep in mind that everyone builds up to high volume of any exercise. Indian athletes have done hundreds of Hindu pushups and Hindu squats daily as the core of their strength training. Convict Conditioning prescribes 3 sets of 30 or 40 partially supported bodyweight squats by the 2nd or 3rd step, not as work sets but as a benchmark before moving on. You build up your work sets first.

    Partial support allows you to condition your joints for "hundreds of movements" first. Once your joints and tendons are prepared, you transition in the rest of your bodyweight. This is not something you just do overnight. I do bodyweight squats all day to combat chair fatigue and rehab a knee.
    [B][URL="http://ironflinger.blogspot.com"]John Beamon[/URL][/B]
    [SIZE=1]
    [SIZE=2] My thread "Guest User? Really" prompted some 6 pages of discussion on why Pavel's user account had been changed to "Guest User" status. John Du Cane answered in a forthright manner, and I thanked him for his professionalism in this very forum.

    That entire thread was removed from the forum on or around August 26. I've been an HKC and an active, outspoken member in good standing for some 3yrs now, but I don't support this sort of censorship. Look for me on the public web.

    -j
    [/SIZE][/SIZE]

  8. #8
    C Aegir is offline Junior Member
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    Default

    I myself need to re-implement them into my workouts. I purchased C.C. years ago and did them working up to 100 at the end of my routine. Then got off-track and stopped. They're a great compliment to the workout.

  9. #9
    Brandonlynch is offline Banned
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    Default Hard

    It even harder when you deliberately slow down so say, 4 seconds upp and 4 seconds down, when you do you get burned out fast. It's really hard, I dont know the beneifts of doing it like this but Super slow training must have some merit within it? Or even 3 seconds up and down.

    I suppose depending on how I am feeling.

  10. #10
    whiskey is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brandonlynch View Post
    It even harder when you deliberately slow down so say, 4 seconds upp and 4 seconds down, when you do you get burned out fast. It's really hard, I dont know the beneifts of doing it like this but Super slow training must have some merit within it? Or even 3 seconds up and down.

    I suppose depending on how I am feeling.

    The reason why most people despise bodyweight squats is probably that they don't find them "hard enough".

    I think that is a mistake and that they actually are hard enough if you look from the aspect of conditioning. They are certainly harder than jogging and still people accept jogging as a legit exercise. (try to do BW squats for a half of hour - not easy)

    So I don't think you should deliberately try to make them "harder" by slowing down through reps, but try to get a decent number of reps.

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