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  1. #11
    demarcoa is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rich in Nor Cal View Post
    \In brief, wouldn't the tradeoff be a higher single rep max for less endurance for the powerlifter versus a lower single rep max for more endurance by the bodybuilder?
    I wouldn't put it quite that way but generally speaking, that's the reason that while most powerlifters who 'specialize' for a 1RM have higher 1RMs than bodybuilders who don't... but those bodybuilders are often better and taking a slightly lighter weight, maybe 80% 1RM, and doing reps with it. Simply because that's the range they train with.


    Quote Originally Posted by faizalenu View Post
    ==> Donnie Thompson lifts in the low rep ranges, and he weighs about 390lbs. What is true is that AT FIRST you get stronger mostly neural adaptation. You may get 2x as strong, but you won't get 2x as big, so at least part of the the strength has to be coming from neural adaptations. But you don't decide how you get stronger, your body does. It adapts to what you are doing. By your faulty logic, no big people would be strong.
    Yes, very true. If you get stronger, you will get bigger... how much bigger depends on factors like diet and genetics, among other things. Rep range doesn't matter so much imo.
    Being strong in more exercises also seems to = more muscle, usually. Someone who does the big 3 plus military presses, curls, rows and heavy power cleans will probably be bigger than someone who just does the 'big 3'. And someone who gets obscenely strong in various other exercises will be bigger still, even if he isn't quite so good at the big 3... because someone who only does the O-lifts, or the big 3, will be very efficient and doing them but not so strong overall.

  2. #12
    EricJMoss is offline Senior Member
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    demands create structure. high reps, low reps they all have a purpose...it just depends on what your purpose is
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  3. #13
    AriSuper is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by demarcoa View Post
    ... because someone who only does the O-lifts, or the big 3, will be very efficient and doing them but not so strong overall.
    could you elaborate more on this?
    I was under the impression that you don't really need that super complexed workouts to be strong overall,how does this go with the PTTP philosophy, a pull and a press ?
    I'm not trying to diss,but how would your conclusion fair with someone who has a 2Xbodyweight deadlift, 1Xbodyweight military press, 1.5Xbodyweight clean and a 1/2Xbodyweight FCT?

  4. #14
    demarcoa is offline Member
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    To clarify, look at a lightweight oly lifter who focuses his training on just the snatch, C&J and maybe overhead/front squats (like the bulgarians). He'll be incredibly strong, especially p4p on those lifts and extremely efficient. But put him under something like a log press, bent-over row or odd object lift and he won't do so well, simply because he doesn't practice those lifts. He has just enough muscle to get that big snatch and C&J and no excess in other places he doesn't need it.
    (Now, not all oly lifters train like that, the chinese for example do tons of rows, strict presses, bottoms-up overhead squats, cheat curls, bench, etc etc.)
    Now take someone who's built a strong base with the major compound lifts and then builds up his strength on the other stuff. Everything from chins to dumbbell presses, front squats, leg press, whatever. He probably won't be as good on the main lifts as someone who specialized but he'll be better at the other stuff, and he'll be bigger since his muscles had to adapt to more varied stimuli.
    Someone else can probably explain it better than I can.
    And I actually wouldn't call a 2x bw deadlift strong, unless it's a 300-pound guy doing it. A bodyweight press is decent, I can't do it quite yet, but really those # are just the beginning.

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