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  1. #31
    Bradley is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dungerdoodle View Post
    I'm no professional, only a student. But maybe your golgi tendon organ got messed up on the knee you damaged in the past. Golgi tendon organs are located on the tendon where it meets the muscle. They are a proprioceptor which gives the nervous system feedback about muscle tension, joint postion, and joint angle. If this gets severely damaged during a tendon strain or rupture your physiological and conscious control and awareness of a joint being moved through space can be seriously affected.
    THat might actually make a lot of sense. I was stretching both quads at the same time years ago and thought I might have pushed it too far. The "deadness" in the quads wasn't a problem when I first sought help, but some time after that stretch, my quads felt, and still feel dead near the kneecap.
    Last edited by Bradley; 03-11-2011 at 06:48 PM. Reason: Added "s" to "year"

  2. #32
    Bradley is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dungerdoodle View Post
    I'm no professional, only a student. But maybe your golgi tendon organ got messed up on the knee you damaged in the past. Golgi tendon organs are located on the tendon where it meets the muscle. They are a proprioceptor which gives the nervous system feedback about muscle tension, joint postion, and joint angle. If this gets severely damaged during a tendon strain or rupture your physiological and conscious control and awareness of a joint being moved through space can be seriously affected.
    Is there anything that can be done about that?

  3. #33
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    Have you tried foam rolling? It sounds like maybe your IT bands could be tight. Look into self myofacial release. It couldn't hurt to try.

  4. #34
    Bradley is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rooster Cogburn View Post
    Have you tried foam rolling? It sounds like maybe your IT bands could be tight. Look into self myofacial release. It couldn't hurt to try.
    I have not done much of it. I've been told I don't have a big problem with tightness, but I'm making a point of doing it frequently now to see if it does anything. Do you know how long it should take to get results, if it's helping?

  5. #35
    Dungerdoodle is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bradley View Post
    Is there anything that can be done about that?
    All I know is that when a competing athlete ruptures a tendon and it must be reattached through surgery the GTO is usually removed or significantly damaged during the surgery. If the medical team is competent the athlete will go through a neural retraining phase of their post surgery rehab that focuses on retraining the nervous system to work around the GTO malfunction. I have no knowledge on what that kind of rehab work entails though.

  6. #36
    Dungerdoodle is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bradley View Post
    I have not done much of it. I've been told I don't have a big problem with tightness, but I'm making a point of doing it frequently now to see if it does anything. Do you know how long it should take to get results, if it's helping?
    If your IT is tight it would let you know when you foam roll it. the IT, vastus lateralis, and tensor fascia latae can all be pretty painful to foam roll for the first time if they are tight or loaded with TP's. When you foam roll the IT band make sure you also roll the tensor fascia latae (the muscle on the hip the IT band connects too). The IT band itself is just a long piece of connective tissue that attaches to the tibia then attaches to the tensor fascia latae (TFL) on the hip. Muscle adhesion's and tightness in the TFL will tighten and put strain on the IT band.
    Last edited by Dungerdoodle; 03-12-2011 at 12:05 PM. Reason: left 'sure' out.

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