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  1. #1
    Walter Dorey is offline Senior Member
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    Default Convict Conditioning and rep speed

    Just some thoughts that may help others in getting better results from following CC and other strength training, such as with weights of any sort.

    This is mainly in the quest of developing more strength through creating tension and how it can relate to rep speed in the exercise.

    I have read and tried all sorts of rep speed cadences over the years in trying to get stronger. There is a much better way than counting rep speed. Here are a few thoughts that will hopefully end the confusion for some:

    Speed of Execution « Sinew & Steel



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  2. #2
    JJC
    JJC is offline Member
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    Long Article.

    I would say for ConvCond in general the rep speed should be just quicker then mid-range, as you said, not sooo slow and not sloppy fast. But it's Bodyweight exercise so I like a bit of crispness to it if counting rep/ sets.

    A pause at each rep also creates a nice cadence. or even 2 pauses, top and bottom. I don't know anything about tension so it may require you to explode out of one of the -centric portions, thus making for only a single pause.

    I also have been doing the lower progressions as dynamic stretches here and there, for warm ups or just to kill some free time. I don't generally count these out so it is like you mentioned in the article, focused on what it is, and not on how many. Doing them as a Dynamic does set a nice pace though.

  3. #3
    305pelusa Guest

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    Thank you for the article! Once you get to the higher CC steps though, trust me, you will not count the tempo. It's practically impossible to focus on counting and performing well on the Cal.
    On Pull-ups and Push-ups, I counted. Once I progressed further, it became too hard. It wasn't really a problem for me.

    When I use the lower steps for warm-ups though, I do them in a very fast pace. This is to both, increase the heart rate, and prepare the joints and muscles. I found no reason to do slow controlled reps for the warm-up. Fast, dynamic ones proved more effective with me.

  4. #4
    PusherUpper is offline Senior Member
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    Default

    Good article. And I do the same as 305pelusa, in regards to closed pushups, during my warm-up. Fast. But when I do lever pushups, nice and slow. I just took a week off from exercising this past week. The first time that I took a week off since starting to work out this past August. Now I'm able to do 10 HSPU instead of 8. And part of the reason, like your article says, is in regards to how fast or how slow you do it. I did 3x10 today with no problem. And this past Monday. I was doing them too slow before, taxing my CNS. And another good point that you made, "So, if you can feel the load or resistance throughout the entire range of movement of a particular exercise, your rep speed is good." That is so true. I really can tell by that with pullups, chair dips, and HSPU. Then when I'm done with my workout, I'll knock out as many pushups as I can, fast.

    On a side note, I'm just confused as to how much do I need to workout every week in order to mantain what I have, compared to how much to workout in order to grow, which I want to do. How many times a week. I just started doing 3 sets of 8 reps of 5 different exercises, in 40 minutes. I'll give that a try as I figure out what to do. When I was waking up in the middle of the night, not being able to fall back to sleep, being moody, having a compulsive need to exercise, a washed-out feeling, soreness in shoulders, (Com. Pavel wasn't kidding when he said that HSPU "smoke" the shoulders), then something was telling me that I was overtraining. A week off helped a lot. I'll be doing that every 8 weeks from now on.

  5. #5
    gtrgy888 is offline Senior Member
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    I like the idea of maximizing tension for the purposes of strength. That said, I also strongly endorse training calisthenics according to a set cadence, whether it's given by a metronome, clock, or fairly accurate volunteer. With every repetition taking the same amount of time, added repetitions are guaranteed to add time under tension. Otherwise, timing is at least partially subjective, which encourages speeding up and sloppy form. When people chase reps, they are trying desperately to cram more repetitions into the same amount of time per set. As a result, they reach plateaus when they can no longer cram any more repetitions in the amount of time it takes their muscles to fail. By contrast, the people who time their repetitions can objectively quantify how much time under tension they gain week by week. This approach removes a lot of guesswork and frustration while maximizing results.
    CC Progress
    Pushups 9 Leg Raises 10+ Pullups 8 Squats 9
    Bridges 6 Handstand Pushups 4

  6. #6
    305pelusa Guest

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    Hi PusherUp!
    In answer to your question, it's very dependent on the individual. For me, if I just want to maintain, it depends on two things.
    1)Was I overtraining right before? If I was, like YOU found, taking 5 full rest days actually made me have a PR! Thus, if u want t maintain your level of strength, and u were hitting hard on the exercises, first back-off for a few days. Then go to step 2. If u weren't hitting so close to failure, u can skip the back-off period

    2) In this case, I've found to two things to work out just fine. Cutting the sets in half, or the reps in half. Not both at the same time though. If you opt for the former one, your endurance will slowly decrease through time, but your strength will stay the same. If you opt for the latter one, be sure to max out your reps from time to time, just so you are still used to showing your strength if needed.

    Those are VERY general guidelines that work with me. When I maxed out at 7 Pistols, I decided to do the experiment. I did half the sets. When I tested a month later, I still got the 7. I did the same with Pull-ups on another occasion, cut the reps in half (I had 18, so I went to 10), and use that. When I tested for my PR, it went slightly down (16). That led me to believe that if u cut the reps in half, at least max out once a month to maintain the groove of a high-rep set.

    Hope that helps!

  7. #7
    PusherUpper is offline Senior Member
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    Thanks 305pelusa. I'll give that cutting the sets in half a try. I've tried cutting the reps down, and yes, like you said, my endurance did decrease.

  8. #8
    DTris is offline Senior Member
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    Great article. I really like the idea of going by feel. However it also takes people time to learn how to feel their body. For people who cannot feel their body well a set cadence can help them learn what the appropriate load feels like. I feel like this is true with the lower steps of CC so when you get to the higher steps the cadence is ingrained and will not need thought about.

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