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  1. #1
    David C. is offline Senior Member
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    Default For all kettlbell lifters 35 years old and older

    I just want to urge all kettlebell lifters 35 years old and older to practice some kind of range of motion and flexibility work. If you spend any significant time under the bells you are at risk of developing tendinitis. Based on my research (and recent experience), athletes over 35 need at least 10-15 minutes of ROM and flexibility work a day (NOT 5 minutes; 10-15 minimum).
    My numbers really increased the last couple years but my flexibility work, although consistent, was just a few minutes a day, and not sufficient to ward off tendinitis.
    I know my pitch has all the glamor and persuasiveness of "eat your vegetables", so I'll leave you with this:

    Imagine you are consistently making good progress and are just a few reps shy of making CMS...and then you injure yourself three months before a competition. Then you find out the injury was preventable if you had just done 15 minutes of prevention work a day.

    That's what I'm passing on to you. if you want more details, please see my blog. I'll be adding another post soon about what I'm doing to stay in shape while I heal, and the ROM and flexibility work I've added since the injury.
    Good luck and safe lifting.
    [URL]http://southernkettlebeller.blogspot.com/[/URL]

  2. #2
    mfbunch is offline Senior Member
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    Fort Knox, KY
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    Second that recommendation! I haven't experienced tendonitis, but your performance will certainly suffer if you don't have the flexibility to move into the required ranges of motion. I've found overhead static holds and hangs helpful for the shoulders, and mobility drills from kbftgu and dynami helpful for the hips and t-spine. I'll also stress the importance of taking the time to stretch after your workouts. This didn't seem as important even five years ago, but I can certainly tell a difference when I get in a time crunch and blow it off.

  3. #3
    nel34 is offline Senior Member
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    Default

    Do you think Z health would be a viable option for ROM and flexibility?

  4. #4
    Chiggers Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by nel34 View Post
    Do you think Z health would be a viable option for ROM and flexibility?
    Yes or Super Joints, or Steve Maxwells stuff, Intuflow etc.

  5. #5
    johnbeamon is offline Senior Member
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    41 here, and in full agreement. I'll have several joints pop in the first reps of almost any session. Better to open up the movement without heavy load first.

    I also started studying the mobility and flexibility training of some of the IKSFA elite. Vasiliev said on camera that a proper stretch-out after training did him as much good as a massage. I had gotten away from static stretching for a while, but it was merely misplaced. I stretch out after snatch days now, and I can touch forehead to knees. That's farther than I ever did in high school, and I carry very little soreness after timed sets of snatches and time on the bike.
    [B][URL="http://ironflinger.blogspot.com"]John Beamon[/URL][/B]
    [SIZE=1]
    [SIZE=2] My thread "Guest User? Really" prompted some 6 pages of discussion on why Pavel's user account had been changed to "Guest User" status. John Du Cane answered in a forthright manner, and I thanked him for his professionalism in this very forum.

    That entire thread was removed from the forum on or around August 26. I've been an HKC and an active, outspoken member in good standing for some 3yrs now, but I don't support this sort of censorship. Look for me on the public web.

    -j
    [/SIZE][/SIZE]

  6. #6
    ad5ly is offline Senior Member
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    When I was well into my 40s it actually never occured to me that I should train differently than when I was 20. At 20 I was in the USMC - and I trained the way gungy Marines have allways trained - no pain no gain. 5 mile runs with boots and a haversack filled with sand. Pullups/pushups flutterkicks, bends and thrusts..actually very little weight lifting, mainly body weight training and ALOT of running. Back THEN I could do this almost everyday for long extended periods and with little to no warm ups. And with a hangover from excessive drinking and little sleep from the the night before. OoooRahhh!!!..Just do it. I am smarter now (I believe so anyway) Now I figure that at 56 yrs old I could probably survive 1 to 2 days maybe 3 at the most of a typical USMC bootcamp experience and get through it. After the 3rd day I think I am going to have problems due to that I need more recovery time - which would not be provided in any event. Thats the difference between the young uns and old farts - us old guys can fake it for a day or two - but when you are young the body is far more forgiving to the punishment it gets. The old guys break down quick. Also the young pups have the fear of GOD that they will be on the receiving end of the Drill Instructors wrath if they don't perform well. I suspect that a DI's wrath would not have the same effect on me as it once did - I would be too tired to care..hehe!!.. so I would not be adequately motivated to complete 13 weeks of bootcamp at my advanced age. So if you are 35 - don't swim in de-Nile. You are now a member of the Old Farts Club!.. hehe!!...Dennis

  7. #7
    Rob Drewry is offline Banned
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    Quote Originally Posted by ad5ly View Post
    When I was well into my 40s it actually never occured to me that I should train differently than when I was 20. At 20 I was in the USMC - and I trained the way gungy Marines have allways trained - no pain no gain. 5 mile runs with boots and a haversack filled with sand. Pullups/pushups flutterkicks, bends and thrusts..actually very little weight lifting, mainly body weight training and ALOT of running. Back THEN I could do this almost everyday for long extended periods and with little to no warm ups. And with a hangover from excessive drinking and little sleep from the the night before. OoooRahhh!!!..Just do it. I am smarter now (I believe so anyway) Now I figure that at 56 yrs old I could probably survive 1 to 2 days maybe 3 at the most of a typical USMC bootcamp experience and get through it. After the 3rd day I think I am going to have problems due to that I need more recovery time - which would not be provided in any event. Thats the difference between the young uns and old farts - us old guys can fake it for a day or two - but when you are young the body is far more forgiving to the punishment it gets. The old guys break down quick. Also the young pups have the fear of GOD that they will be on the receiving end of the Drill Instructors wrath if they don't perform well. I suspect that a DI's wrath would not have the same effect on me as it once did - I would be too tired to care..hehe!!.. so I would not be adequately motivated to complete 13 weeks of bootcamp at my advanced age. So if you are 35 - don't swim in de-Nile. You are now a member of the Old Farts Club!.. hehe!!...Dennis
    Ah, the days of yesteryear, when youth and desire could sustain us through any endeavor. I recall 1972, joining the Army after graduating hs, thinking "This PT isn't as bad as I thought it was going to be". I don't think I could fake it for even a day now. Ok, maybe I'd make it into the 2nd day.

  8. #8
    miller is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by ad5ly View Post
    So if you are 35 - don't swim in de-Nile. You are now a member of the Old Farts Club!.. hehe!!...Dennis
    I just turned 35 this past February. I knew I felt older for some reason, but now I see why. I'm now an official Old Fart! No need to worry about going "over the hill" in a few - I'm already in! And I still easily also fall back on the "I don't need much warming up", but now that I'm in the club I reckon I'll start gettin' with the Geritol program.

  9. #9
    David C. is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnbeamon View Post
    41 here, and in full agreement. I'll have several joints pop in the first reps of almost any session. Better to open up the movement without heavy load first.

    I also started studying the mobility and flexibility training of some of the IKSFA elite. Vasiliev said on camera that a proper stretch-out after training did him as much good as a massage. I had gotten away from static stretching for a while, but it was merely misplaced. I stretch out after snatch days now, and I can touch forehead to knees. That's farther than I ever did in high school, and I carry very little soreness after timed sets of snatches and time on the bike.
    I think that interview of Vasiliev is posted on my blog. I have video clips of his joint mobility and stretching routine in that post.
    [URL]http://southernkettlebeller.blogspot.com/[/URL]

  10. #10
    Stu E is offline Member
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    I'm 35 and ditto everything said so far. You have to make a choice whether to moan about the aches and pains or do as we have all done, address the issue. SJ and ETK with weekly Hill sprints work wonders for me.
    Have you met my new best friend, the TGU?

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