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  1. #1
    Wassernixe is offline Junior Member
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    Default timed workouts - purpose/goals?

    Many training programs with kettlebells include - from what I understand - timed workouts (timed work period/timed rest period). My question is whether those workouts aim more at strength gains or conditioning/cardiovascular benefits. Clearly if the work time is 2 minutes this isn`t a strength workout anymore...But what about 30 seconds? If I am not told differently I tend to perform my reps very slowly so for some movements (squats, push presses) I might well below 10-12 reps which seems to indicate a strength workout with just a shorter rest period than usual (if it is set at 30 seconds as well). Maybe I don´t perform as explosive enough and change the goal of the workout that way? Can anyone explain that type of workout to me?
    Thank you!

  2. #2
    Silverfroth is offline Senior Member
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    Both - it depends on how you're having to push yourself and what you're doing.

    The idea of the timed set is to offset the 'limit and quit' habit that comes from setting X number of reps.
    People tend to set limits that are achievable. I can do 40 one-armed rows - so that's a part of my routine - 20(2)(2) . . . 40 on each side. Whoopie. I can do that in my sleep. It's kind of hard but it's not extreme challenging - I can do more.

    So doing that in a time limit? That guides me to do more - even if I have to eek out those last few and push myself to get to the end-mark.

    VO2, mental conditioning, incrase of speed and other factors play into it as well.
    [CENTER][SIZE=3]Enjoy[/SIZE][/CENTER]

  3. #3
    darryllardizabal is offline Senior Member
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    Timed workouts play more to volume and density which typically increased conditioning/cardiovascular.

    To some extent they can increase strength, but not nearly to the same extent as conditioning.

    Most people that focus on long rest periods and slow rep speeds should eventually focus on a volume and density program right afterwards because of the way the body operates.
    Darryl Lardizabal, USAW, Z-Health Movement Performance Specialist (R,I,S,T)
    E-Mail: [EMAIL="apolakifitness@gmail.com"]apolakifitness@gmail.com[/EMAIL]
    Blog: [URL]http://www.movefu.com[/URL] & [URL="http://www.apolakifitness.com"][U]http://www.apolakifitness.com[/U][/URL]

    [I]Disclaimer: [/I][B]Posts [U][I]NOT[/I][/U] intended as professional medical, training or nutrition advice.[/B][I] Please see your trusted medical professional first.[/I]

  4. #4
    SThom27 is offline Senior Member
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    I'm not sure if he's still lurking on here, but Britt Buckingham does a a lot of training with timed sets. He would probably say that you can use them to increase whatever you want, be it strength or conditioning. EDT agrees and adds hypertrophy to the gains that are possible.

  5. #5
    Britt Buckingham is offline Senior Member
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    Linked below are a couple write-ups on the topic. Like most things it is purely opinion, but is borne from lots of trial and error and adapting to what actually worked for us. It may not fit to what you are seeking to do, but might give you some additional thoughts as you explore your own training.

    http://auburnsc.blogspot.com/2010/10...-training.html

    http://auburnsc.blogspot.com/2010/09...r-tension.html

  6. #6
    David C. is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wassernixe View Post
    Many training programs with kettlebells include - from what I understand - timed workouts (timed work period/timed rest period). My question is whether those workouts aim more at strength gains or conditioning/cardiovascular benefits. Clearly if the work time is 2 minutes this isn`t a strength workout anymore...But what about 30 seconds? If I am not told differently I tend to perform my reps very slowly so for some movements (squats, push presses) I might well below 10-12 reps which seems to indicate a strength workout with just a shorter rest period than usual (if it is set at 30 seconds as well). Maybe I don´t perform as explosive enough and change the goal of the workout that way? Can anyone explain that type of workout to me?
    Thank you!
    1. The aim of the workout depends upon which one we're discussing. There are many using timed sets.

    2. The kettlebell is primarily an endurance tool. Not a strength tool or even a strength endurance tool. Other implements are better at cultivating strength or strength or endurance. Because of their shape and design, kettlebells are the best weight implement for pure endurance work.

    3. Depending upon the program you are using, timed kettlebell undurance sets last anywhere from 1 minute to over 10 minutes. One common system rarely performs sets under 5 minutes, and usually stays in the 5-7 minute range. Other systems use multiple 2-6 minute sets with short timed rest periods.

    4. Obviously these systems necessitate much higher volume than 10 sets of 5 and the like. If you are really serious about kettlebell lifting I suggest trying sets of longer duration. Your conditioning will improve dramatically.
    [URL]http://southernkettlebeller.blogspot.com/[/URL]

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