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  1. #1
    Bradley is offline Senior Member
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    Default Squatting, Knees First?

    Check out these guys squatting. Is this bad form? They look like they have very good hamstring and glute development. But it seems like they don't start by pushing their butts back, and the way they do it always felt more natural to me. But it may be that that's what got me into trouble.


  2. #2
    Emby is offline Senior Member
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    Nothing wrong with what they are doing, excellent technique. They are doing predominantly olympic squats, not powerlifting squats. Notice how their bodies stay upright, good lumbar curve and great thoracic spine mobility.

    Check out this link http://www.t-nation.com/readArticle.do?id=1736931 an article by Geoff Neupert and Mike Robertson
    Last edited by Emby; 05-26-2011 at 12:31 AM. Reason: Link added
    Two Quotes I live by:

    'We all must suffer one of two things - the pain of discipline or the pain of regret and dissapointment. Discipline weighs ounces while regret weighs pounds'

    'Look after you body, it's the only place you have to live'

    Jim Rohn

  3. #3
    rifstonian Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bradley View Post
    Check out these guys squatting. Is this bad form? They look like they have very good hamstring and glute development. But it seems like they don't start by pushing their butts back, and the way they do it always felt more natural to me. But it may be that that's what got me into trouble.

    Squats start by opening up the knees and sitting down, pull patterns( swings, deads) start with the hinge. Not the same. these are great squats.Some confusion exists because powerlifters 'squat" by hinging and leaning over, more of a good morning/deadlift pattern than a true squat and works well with a low bar rack position and wide stance.

  4. #4
    Jethro is offline Senior Member
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    Default Weightlifting Squats

    Because of the nature of this style you don't often see spotters. The bar is just dumped backward. Gotta keep the hips coming through though.

    Sometimes you'll see lifters push their hips back on the way up when the weight gets too heavy (the hips don't get through). This is especially true on front squats. Evident when you see the elbows drop on the initial drive back up.

    The legs share more of the work, and the hips (and back) don't get as wide because of excessive use of the hips. The mental cue is still at the hips, but you squat much farther up in the stance which requires you to use your legs more on the drive back up. When viewed from the side the knees will travel over the toes more, also because of squatting further up in the stance.

  5. #5
    adamadkins is offline Senior Member
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    Default

    Just to add to the discussion - although it has pretty much been cleared up - the video is what is often referred to as "High Bar Squats". They are utilized almost exclusively by olympic lifters. You can see the bar is actually slightly higher on the lifters back and the squat is slightly deeper. Often times during the high bar squat it does appear that the lifters knees break first. But make no mistake, the lifter's posterior chain is engaged.

    You won't see the high bar outside of oly circles. Most coaches use the high bar (some even call the olympic squat) rather than the low bar (which I believe was referred to in this thread as a power squat) because they argue it most mimics coming out of the hole in a dynamic lift.

    Mark Rippetoe argues that oly lifters should use the low bar squat because it most mimics the 2nd pull of both lifts. But he is the only coach I have ever seen argue this.

    On a final note, I will say I am not a huge fan of the lifter racking the weight backwards. I would say that is "bad form" but it apparently is perfectly acceptable to these elite level athletes so who am I to say.

  6. #6
    Bradley is offline Senior Member
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    Also, it seems like their knees buckle inward a lot. How do they get away with this?

  7. #7
    Silverfroth is offline Senior Member
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    Default

    Interesting thread.

    I was originally taught with this 'high bar squat' (though I never called it anything other than a deep squat) and always considered it a common squat and had a seriously hard time learning a powerlifting or sumo squat later on.
    Enjoy

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