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  1. #1
    Pats is offline Member
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    Default How to train/progress with the TGU

    Hello.

    I just recently learned how to perform a TGU with an RKC. I started with no KB and then started practicing them with a 10kg KB.

    I now want to practice at home but I only have one 20kg KB.

    I wanted to know if I had to a buy a lighter KB for my TGUs.

    If so, what is the general starting weight for men for it?
    Will I also have to buy multiple KBs in order to work my way up to the 20kg one?

    For information, I'm not a beginner with KBs, my snatch record with the 20kg KB was 136 in 10 min, I just never learned how to perform the TGU (it's dumb I know as it's such a good exercise).

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    Yorkshirecomrade Guest

    Default

    First thing... purchase Kettlebells From The Ground Up. Reading it and following drills will perfect technique. Then just work through singles for time (say ten mins) a couple of times per week. You will know when you are ready for a bigger bell.

    My advice would be to start with a bell that produces perfect technique.

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

    Good physiques are not given. They are forged through time, effort, dedication and hard work.
    Last edited by Yorkshirecomrade; 06-12-2011 at 02:41 AM.

  3. #3
    faizalenu is offline Senior Member
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    Default

    Here is the deal. If you are not using a bell for anything else, I wouldn't purchase it just for TGUs. While I learned the TGU from doing kettlebells, the TGU is not a kettlebell exercise. If you have a dumbbell use that. Also, house hold objects work well too.

    Here are all of the objects that I have TGUed:
    * 12, 16, 20, 24, 32, 40, and 48kg kettlebells
    * Barbell, up to 125lb
    * Golf bag
    * Sandbag
    * Dumbbells up to 80lb (this is something you probably have that is a weight you are used to)
    * Groceries
    * Bowling Ball Bag
    * Book Bag
    * Suit case (if you need a workout while on vacation
    * Empty Keg

    In my workshops, I teach that the TGU is NOT a kettlebell exercise, and TGU a myriad of stuff around the studio.
    Faizal S. Enu, CFT/RKC/PBA
    My blog: [URL]http://faizalenu.blogspot.com[/URL]
    Workshop Schedule: [URL="http://tinyurl.com/XA-Kettlebell-Workshops"]http://tinyurl.com/XA-Kettlebell-Workshops[/URL]

  4. #4
    Pats is offline Member
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    Default

    Yes indeed, I don't see how a 12kg KB will do me any good for anything other than "TGU"ing.

    I do have dumbbells but didn't think to "TGU" them since I thought a KB was required for the correct balance (or something).

    So what you're saying is that I can work myself up to the 20kg KB using DBs? (of course eventually buying a heavier KB).

  5. #5
    ad5ly is offline Senior Member
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    Default

    If you are keenly interested in doing the TGU, and doing it well, get KETTLEBELLS FROM THE GROUND UP. A point to note is that the TGU is not done to fatigue. Even with the 20kg bell you can still "practice" TGUs. Begin the TGU and continue to move through each movement phase of the drill. When you hit a difficult stage, then that becomes your focus for the time being. Completing all stages of the TGU is not so as important as overcoming the difficult parts as they present themselves. In other words PARTIAL TGUs are just as good if that is where you are at. If all you manage is a roll to press and then a press to elbow with a 20kg thats fine - you will eventually get the strength neccessary to move on the the next stage - but don't rush it...Dennis

  6. #6
    Chris Hansen is offline Senior Member
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    Default

    I did 1/2-ups until I was strong enough to do the full get-up with confidence.

  7. #7
    Pats is offline Member
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    Default

    I am interested in TGUs but I don't want to buy those dvds as I just had an RKC describe and show me the TGU (as well as correct my form). It was a tiring 5h session (not just for the TGU mind you :P).

    The reason I didn't really wanna try the TGU with the 20kg KB is that my arm gets really tired just holding up the KB, let alone trying to get up.

  8. #8
    Chris Hansen is offline Senior Member
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    You could work 1/2-ups until your arms gets stronger. It worked for me.

  9. #9
    Pats is offline Member
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    Default

    Ok guess I'll do what you guys said and work each part slowly building strength with the 20kg KB.

    Thanks a lot for the helpful posts everyone!

  10. #10
    Josef is offline Senior Member
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    Pats, just ask yourself why you're doing the getup. Are you training for heavier getups? Alrighty. Think about what a getup is. You're getting up with the weight. Brilliant! Now look at the way you move. Record it even.

    Now where did your RKC tell you to put the foot of the posted leg? If they said anywhere near the other leg, they're wrong. Bring your leg at least forty-five degrees from the hip. If it's too close, your base of support will be too narrow, you'll have no leverage and you'll never move a heavy weight.

    Where is the posted hand positioned? Is it down by the hip? I remember being told about that area. Ignore this advice too. It has the same problem as the foot positioning. Bring your arm higher to lift heavier.

    Now what about that hip bridge? Take a look at your video. If you've got the camera from the side, you'll notice the bell doesn't move during the hip bridge. It does NOTHING to move the weight up, limits the weight you can use, and is just a waste of energy. Looks kinda cool but it's pointless.

    Now, on training. Using heavy halfups, my getup jumped to 140lb at a bodyweight of about 150lb. Now, seeing that you only have a 20kg bell, try this. First, look at the various stages of the lift as resistance. Going from your elbow to your hand is like a five pound jump in most other lifts. If a stage feels hard, stop at the one before that.

    To press=1
    To elbow=2
    To hand=3
    To knee=4
    To lunge=5
    To standing=6

    Start a timer and perform singles, alternating hands. Go only as slow as you need to. In fact, go as fast as you are able to focus on your form. Keep alternating hands until a rep moves slower than the last, you feel excessive tension, your breathing becomes audible, or your arm starts shifting around. If you feel pain, you should have stopped WAY sooner! Begin your next set when you feel ready.

    When you are fatigued (ideally, stop a little sooner), stop the timer. Now write down the end time. Tracking your progress is simple. Write down what stage you performed your reps to, the total number of reps, and the total time. For simplicity's sake, we'll consolidate the reps and make 7x1 per hand into 14x1. Now, say seven getups to the lunge per hand in 4:46. Intensity (resistance) would be (to lunge) 5. Volume (total reps times resistance) would be (14x5)70. Density (volume divided by time) would be (70/4:46) 13 points per minute.

    It sounds complicated but it can simply be logged like this.
    Getup to lunge-4/4, 3/3-4:46
    Int-5, Vol-70, Den-13

    As those numbers grow, so will your strength. Anyone who says that's simply looking for progress should read Return of the Kettlebell. By doing more ladders, you're increasing the volume. By doing it in shorter time periods, you're increasing the density. By moving up in weight, you're increasing the intensity. Hail to the Chief.
    [COLOR=black][I]Are you a man, a dog, or a monster?[/I][/COLOR]

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