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  1. #11
    shmathews is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by faizalenu View Post
    It is not hard. If you are lifting on the platform, you want to be wearing shoes because there is a lot of ballistic force on your heels that are much higher than just the weight lifting. Oly lifting in barefeet is just painful.

    The heel is a anterior weight shift that makes getting into a full squat receiving position easier. The groove of a back squat and an oly front squat are different, thus the difference in heel differential.

    Also, I lift in two gyms that have concrete floors. Barefoot would not be optimal. I lift in All-Stars (hard and flat sole). Think of All-Stars as a floor you can bring with you. If you want to talk about proprioception, I would argue that you would get better proprioception with chucks and no socks that you would with socks alone.
    Faizal is correct. Weightlifting shoes have hard soles with traction on the bottom so you don't slip, and have a slightly elevated heel for recovering from the front and overhead squat catch positions. I bought a pair and use them for both kettlebell and barbell work, and will never use anything else. They make me feel more connected to the ground than chucks. They are perfect for barbell lifting, and pretty good for kettlebell lifting.
    Shmathews

    "Remember too, that I seek neither your approval nor to influence you towards my way of thinking."-- Bruce Lee, [I]Liberate Yourself from Classical Karate[/I]

  2. #12
    Rich in Nor Cal is offline Senior Member
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    I have been using "amphibian" type footwear for over a month now, and they feel great. VFF won't work for me due to my long Morton's Toe (about 8mm longer than my "big" toe). The amphibians feel much like barefoot but with protection against bullthorns and such. I am not sure how durable they will prove to be, but costing about 20% as much as VFFs, I won't be out too much if they fall apart on me soon. I have run a few miles in them and walked some miles, and so far so good. I guess I'll learn their limits. If nothing else, they make a good workout shoe for me, I've had no problem with my foot slipping in them. They seem to be sized larger than regular shoes, so the ones I wear are 2 sizes smaller than my regular shoes. They fit snugly like gloves for feet

  3. #13
    anson is offline Member
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    Why not stick with Vibrams if you need to cover your feet?

  4. #14
    RJ79 is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by fatman View Post
    Strongmen and powerlifters are not stronger than Olympic lifters by any (rational) definition. Nor the other way round. As there is no basis for comparison whatsoever, it is impossible to argue who is stronger.
    Fatman its not impossible to argue anything. lol Like I said it depends on your definition of strength. The guy I was responding to said oly lifters were the strongest strength athletes. Oly lifters do very technical ballistic lifts and are very athletic but IMO their maximal strength falls short of powerlifters and strongmen who train for maximal strength in lifts more conducive to producing it. Could an oly lifter be just as strong (by my definition) as a strongman or powerlifter? Yep they just aren't training for it.

    As far as the shoes go it depends on how wide you squat and bar posish. If you use a narrower stance like an oly lifter and some raw powerlifters the elevated heel will help you hit depth. I recommended shoes off for deadlifting because you are closer to the ground thus shortening your range of motion.

  5. #15
    Pats is offline Member
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    Heh, checked this thread today, way more replies than I expected, but I see everyone has a different opinion.
    One question to faizalenu though, why Chucks without socks? Won't that be really uncomfortable?

  6. #16
    faizalenu is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pats View Post
    Heh, checked this thread today, way more replies than I expected, but I see everyone has a different opinion.
    One question to faizalenu though, why Chucks without socks? Won't that be really uncomfortable?
    The purpose of minimalist footware is to, among other things:
    * Improve proprioception of the feet
    * Leak less energy between your feet and the floor.
    * Maintain a neutral foot position

    The Chucks are a hard sole that doesn't deform much under load, so that takes cares of the leakage. You are essentially wearing the floor on your feet.

    Well socks are a layer between your feet and the floor. They get in the way of feeling the floor.

    And no, they are not uncomfortable. If lifting in them hurts your feet, either:
    * Your shoes don't fit (I teach boot camp, you would be amazed at how my six figure earners don't have shoes that fit). Your feet should not move but the toes should be flat.
    * You haven't done much moving around.

    I have run a 5K in Chucks with no socks. If the foot doesn't slip, it shouldn't be a problem. If you have socks and the foot does slip == blisters....
    Last edited by faizalenu; 06-27-2011 at 08:39 AM.
    Faizal S. Enu, CFT/RKC/PBA
    My blog: [URL]http://faizalenu.blogspot.com[/URL]
    Workshop Schedule: [URL="http://tinyurl.com/XA-Kettlebell-Workshops"]http://tinyurl.com/XA-Kettlebell-Workshops[/URL]

  7. #17
    Pats is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by faizalenu View Post
    The purpose of minimalist footware is to, among other things:
    * Improve proprioception of the feet
    * Leak less energy between your feet and the floor.
    * Maintain a neutral foot position

    The Chucks are a hard sole that doesn't deform much under load, so that takes cares of the leakage. You are essentially wearing the floor on your feet.

    Well socks are a layer between your feet and the floor. They get in the way of feeling the floor.

    And no, they are not uncomfortable. If lifting in them hurts your feet, either:
    * Your shoes don't fit (I teach boot camp, you would be amazed at how my six figure earners don't have shoes that fit). Your feet should not move but the toes should be flat.
    * You haven't done much moving around.

    I have run a 5K in Chucks with no socks.

    The way Chuck work is that the sole
    Thanks for the clear explanation but you kind of cut off in the end :P

    Anyway, guess I'm gonna try it without socks, see how it goes!

  8. #18
    faizalenu is offline Senior Member
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    Corrected my post, but the thoughts were there!
    Faizal S. Enu, CFT/RKC/PBA
    My blog: [URL]http://faizalenu.blogspot.com[/URL]
    Workshop Schedule: [URL="http://tinyurl.com/XA-Kettlebell-Workshops"]http://tinyurl.com/XA-Kettlebell-Workshops[/URL]

  9. #19
    rickbuzz is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maelstrom View Post
    Training with Chucks, I had to be careful to make sure that I was keeping my toes clamped down to the ground - for whatever reason (and because my feet are fairly small) the soles on the chucks tended to curl upwards at the toe, making it look like I was rocking back and forth. Compensating for this caused me to start doing weird things with my toes that had to be un-learned. This only seemed to happen with 1 of the 2 pairs of Chucks that I own, so it might not be an issue for you.
    My Chucks also curl upwards pretty bad, it causes some serious walking issues that I don't get with any of my other shoes. I can't recommend them as a minimalist shoe for this reason. The other problem I have with them is they are to narrow.

  10. #20
    faizalenu is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maelstrom View Post
    I train with Chucks only when I have to wear shoes - otherwise I show up in those $6 Chinese "Kung Fu Slippers" then train barefoot. Training with Chucks, I had to be careful to make sure that I was keeping my toes clamped down to the ground - for whatever reason (and because my feet are fairly small) the soles on the chucks tended to curl upwards at the toe, making it look like I was rocking back and forth. Compensating for this caused me to start doing weird things with my toes that had to be un-learned. This only seemed to happen with 1 of the 2 pairs of Chucks that I own, so it might not be an issue for you.
    I checked out my Chucks, and sure enough the heels curled up. I checked my other shoes (3 pairs of dress shoes, my bowling shoes, soccer flats, soccer cleats, and wrestling shoes) and the toes come up in all of them when unloaded.

    I will have to check out my gait the next time I put them on...
    Faizal S. Enu, CFT/RKC/PBA
    My blog: [URL]http://faizalenu.blogspot.com[/URL]
    Workshop Schedule: [URL="http://tinyurl.com/XA-Kettlebell-Workshops"]http://tinyurl.com/XA-Kettlebell-Workshops[/URL]

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