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Thread: This is a test.

  1. #21
    305pelusa Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bradley View Post
    Well I didn't think I had to be so exacting for the point to be made. I know all the anatomical stuff you're pointing out.

    When I say lower quads I mean the vastus lateralis and medialis. They are lower than the rectus femoris, and a simple look at the legs should make clear what I meant by "lower." I left out the vastus intermedius because I don't know anything about it, except that it's much smaller, or hidden, or something like that.

    And when I talk about raising my leg, it's WITH the lower leg extended, so the vastus lateralis and medialis should be contracting, but they aren't.

    It really seems like people are going out their way to try to NOT understand what I'm saying.
    No no, I understand. I was just pointing a few of the inaccuracies that perhaps Faizalenu was referring to. As I said in my post, they don't really affect the point you are trying to make at all.

    So, long story short, I have absolutely no clue why THAT is happening to you. At all. Maybe they are contracting, but you can't feel it, or maybe the bands you mentioned are too tight and created a misalignement. I don't know, and I completely doubt anyone in this forum knows.

    As Faizalenu (and I) said, you could seek professional help. I did your test, and yes, my quads do contract when I raise my leg. They also contract when I'm trying to achieve knee extension, but I'm not close to it (for instance, at the bottom of a Pistol, I feel my quads tensing up, even though I'm not standing just yet).

  2. #22
    faizalenu is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bradley View Post


    And when I talk about raising my leg, it's WITH the lower leg extended, so the vastus lateralis and medialis should be contracting, but they aren't.

    It really seems like people are going out their way to try to NOT understand what I'm saying.
    Let's see....the word contracting means "to get shorter". The vastus group muscles only cross the knee joint and act in extension. So if your knee is extended, then the vastus group muscles are AS SHORT AS POSSIBLE, and thus are contracted as much as possible.

    Tension, however is a different story. I was stretching someone out yesterday, and I forced the knee into extension. Since I was doing the extending of his knee, he probably had minimal tension since I was providing the force. The would be very different if he was doing a leg extension against and external force, in which case there would be MORE tension.

    AGAIN, position does not equal tension. Look at an ass-to-grass squat. In that case, my knee is in EXTREME TENSION, but it is vastus group is still very much loaded (i.e., has tension). They are tight, but they are not contracted, in fact, they can't get any longer.

    In your case, I guess other muscles might have taken up the slack. If that is causing dysfunction in any way, see a professional, not a forum.
    Faizal S. Enu, CFT/RKC/PBA
    My blog: http://faizalenu.blogspot.com
    Workshop Schedule: http://tinyurl.com/XA-Kettlebell-Workshops

  3. #23
    Bradley is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by faizalenu View Post
    Let's see....the word contracting means "to get shorter". The vastus group muscles only cross the knee joint and act in extension. So if your knee is extended, then the vastus group muscles are AS SHORT AS POSSIBLE, and thus are contracted as much as possible.

    Tension, however is a different story. I was stretching someone out yesterday, and I forced the knee into extension. Since I was doing the extending of his knee, he probably had minimal tension since I was providing the force. The would be very different if he was doing a leg extension against and external force, in which case there would be MORE tension.

    AGAIN, position does not equal tension. Look at an ass-to-grass squat. In that case, my knee is in EXTREME TENSION, but it is vastus group is still very much loaded (i.e., has tension). They are tight, but they are not contracted, in fact, they can't get any longer.

    In your case, I guess other muscles might have taken up the slack. If that is causing dysfunction in any way, see a professional, not a forum.
    Now I see where we went askew

    My definition of contract when applied to the muscles is not specific with regards to position.

    From wikpedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muscle_contraction):

    Although the term contraction implies shortening, when referring to the muscular system, it means muscle fibers generating tension with the help of motor neurons (the terms twitch tension, twitch force, and fiber contraction are also used).

    Your "tension" is my "contraction."

  4. #24
    faizalenu is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bradley View Post
    Now I see where we went askew


    Your "tension" is my "contraction."
    Fair enough. I still say that getting the knee straight does not require high tension when it is not loaded.
    Faizal S. Enu, CFT/RKC/PBA
    My blog: http://faizalenu.blogspot.com
    Workshop Schedule: http://tinyurl.com/XA-Kettlebell-Workshops

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