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  1. #1
    jbenton1 is offline Senior Member
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    Default long-term physical activity has an anti-aging effect at the cellular level

    A study just determined that long-term physical activity has an anti-aging effect at the cellular level. The Journal of the American Heart Association just put into circulation the findings of a study that was funded by the German Research Association & the University of Saarland.
    The researchers were looking at the length of the telomeres. The telomeres are the DNA that bookends the chromosomes and protects them from damage. When the telomeres are shortening it limits the number of cell divisions which can effect your biological clock. Shortening of the telomeres from cell division leads to aging on a cellular level and could shorten life.
    Ulrich Laufs, M.D., the study’s lead author and professor of clinical and experimental medicine in the Department of Internal Medicine at Saarland University in Homburg, Germany said,“The most significant finding of this study is that physical exercise of the professional athletes leads to activation of the important enzyme telomerase and stabilizes the telomere,” He also states, “This is direct evidence of an anti-aging effect of physical exercise. Physical exercise could prevent the aging of the cardiovascular system, reflecting this molecular principle.”
    In other words, the long and hard lifetime training of the professional athletes (up to 50 miles of running per week ) keeps the telomere longer and prevents them from dying off. I have always felt that exercise prolongs life but it’s so hard to prove. This study provides some evidence that long hard training can prolong life but you would have to run 50 miles per week for a life time to get the cellular effect. Is that realistic?


    http://www.fitnesscontrarian.com/exe...prevent-aging/

  2. #2
    bwwm is offline Senior Member
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    Hmmm 50 miles. Wonder how many minutes of kb swings that equates to?

  3. #3
    eraquol is offline Senior Member
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    reminds me of the story about the tarahumara and in what amazing shape they are in even in their 50s

  4. #4
    Chris Hansen is offline Senior Member
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    I wonder if it's primarily endurance training that achieves that effect or is that just what they looked at?

  5. #5
    mc
    mc is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by eraquol View Post
    reminds me of the story about the tarahumara and in what amazing shape they are in even in their 50s

    "even in their 50's"

    i wonder how old the person was who wrote that?

    We seem to have an amazing perception that folks not being decrepit after they go off warranty at 40 is a kind of amazing accomplishment. Maybe it is in a culture where we're so sedantary.

    The thing is when folks move regularly in our lives, eat well, rest well, there's no reason - zero - not to be enjoying wellbeing and excellent health and great strength.

    Does one have to be an elite athlete to have this effect? i wouldn't want an elite athletes associated injuries, so taking that into account, i'm betting "no." just keep moving.

    There's a nice piece in the easy strength book about a colleague of pavel's and his approach to every day fitness - including running - to stay fit, well and strong lifelong. It very much is about easy strength. Daily dosing, at what i've been thinking of as "easy effort" - where figuring out that right effort is really important.

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  6. #6
    faizalenu is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbenton1 View Post
    A study just determined that long-term physical activity has an anti-aging effect at the cellular level. The Journal of the American Heart Association just put into circulation the findings of a study that was funded by the German Research Association & the University of Saarland.
    [/URL]
    Next thing you know they are going to say that working out is good for you...
    Faizal S. Enu, CFT/RKC/PBA
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  7. #7
    eraquol is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by mc View Post
    "even in their 50's"

    i wonder how old the person was who wrote that?

    We seem to have an amazing perception that folks not being decrepit after they go off warranty at 40 is a kind of amazing accomplishment. Maybe it is in a culture where we're so sedantary.

    The thing is when folks move regularly in our lives, eat well, rest well, there's no reason - zero - not to be enjoying wellbeing and excellent health and great strength.

    Does one have to be an elite athlete to have this effect? i wouldn't want an elite athletes associated injuries, so taking that into account, i'm betting "no." just keep moving.

    There's a nice piece in the easy strength book about a colleague of pavel's and his approach to every day fitness - including running - to stay fit, well and strong lifelong. It very much is about easy strength. Daily dosing, at what i've been thinking of as "easy effort" - where figuring out that right effort is really important.

    mc
    Now, I don't know if this is entirely accurate because the lack of studies/evidence but when I say amazing shape I mean it stretches far beyond what would be considered elite status. These individuals run for days in the mountains, suffer from no disease known to the western public, no cancer whatsoever, guys in the fifties outrun guys in the twenties etc etc. It would be interesting to see more studies about these people and see if it all holds true. In the end it is inspiring to read about these guys whose entire lives revolve around running because they think it's the most enjoyable thing. Thanks for the tip on Easy Strength, I will see if I can get it after I've bought CC2, which also, tells stories about people being in excellent shape because of joint training etc.

  8. #8
    fatman is offline Senior Member
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    I am skeptical about the whole "exercise prolongs lifespan" part - this has often been claimed but I have yet to see evidence that supports the claim. The study you mention claims that pro athletes receive this benefit, but pro athletes don't live any longer than their sedentary neighbors (in fact the opposite is often the case). But as far as "exercise prolongs quality lifespan" goes, I tend to agree.
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  9. #9
    faizalenu is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by fatman View Post
    I am skeptical about the whole "exercise prolongs lifespan" part - this has often been claimed but I have yet to see evidence that supports the claim. The study you mention claims that pro athletes receive this benefit, but pro athletes don't live any longer than their sedentary neighbors (in fact the opposite is often the case). But as far as "exercise prolongs quality lifespan" goes, I tend to agree.
    Good point. One thing that people do is equate fitness to health. At a certain point, getting fitter and pushing those boundaries decreases longevity. Look at how many profession wrestlers from Wrestlemania I are now dead. Top level heavier weight powerlifters and bodybuilders on average die earlier. They are definitely fitter, but not healthier.
    Faizal S. Enu, CFT/RKC/PBA
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  10. #10
    eraquol is offline Senior Member
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    I would assume elite-level athletes do not live as long because of the high demands on the body as well as the things they put into themselves just to perform better. Performance does not equal health.

    There's a swedish triathlon champion who discusses this in one of his new books, which is pretty eye-opening.

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