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Thread: Mobility 101

  1. #1
    jetronin is offline Senior Member
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    Default Mobility 101

    Hello all, I've just posted a new article on my blog. Read, enjoy and remember to "like" and "share" if you deem it worthy. comments and feedback welcome.
    http://www.russiankettlebellscotland.com/blog.html
    "Strength does not come from physical capacity.
    It comes from an indomitable will"-Mohandas K. Gandhi.

  2. #2
    305pelusa Guest

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    Question, for the "back-to-wall" drill, should our lower back also be in contact with the wall?

    Nice article BTW. Pretty good guidelines.
    One last thing. By holding the KB overhead and "pushing through the shoulder", you mean shrugging your shoulder?

  3. #3
    jetronin is offline Senior Member
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    No, your lower back doesn't need to touch the wall, in fact i don't even think that's possible.
    It's an extension of a postural drill from Superjoints, and i think (but don't quote me because i'm not 100% sure) the Alexander technique uses a wall as a postural tool as well. I just added the overhead lockout. I've tried it on people of different mobility levels and seems like a pretty solid indicator of good shoulder flexibility.
    "Strength does not come from physical capacity.
    It comes from an indomitable will"-Mohandas K. Gandhi.

  4. #4
    jetronin is offline Senior Member
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    Sorry, no, not shrugging the shoulder but letting the bell pull the arm back just a tiny bit, pushing through the shoulder(back to front).

    Pavel does it in the ETK dvd at the top of the getup. It's just a tiny stretch under load.

    Hope that clears things up.

    David.
    "Strength does not come from physical capacity.
    It comes from an indomitable will"-Mohandas K. Gandhi.

  5. #5
    305pelusa Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by jetronin View Post
    No, your lower back doesn't need to touch the wall, in fact i don't even think that's possible.
    It's an extension of a postural drill from Superjoints, and i think (but don't quote me because i'm not 100% sure) the Alexander technique uses a wall as a postural tool as well. I just added the overhead lockout. I've tried it on people of different mobility levels and seems like a pretty solid indicator of good shoulder flexibility.
    Oh ok. I can do this drill, but my lower back arches greatly (with my glutes still in contact with the wall though). Does that count?

  6. #6
    jetronin is offline Senior Member
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    Your lower back will arch a little, that's fine. Try pressing your low back into the wall. It's simply not do-able. It's more a test of good shoulder mobility than a drill. And if you do L-sit,Tuck planche,advanced tuck front levers, STW HS and german hang, then you don't need the test. Your shoulder mobility will be better than average.

    BTW, how are you liking the steady state G.B. workouts, and how long do you run a cycle before testing? Personally i like a 6 week cycle of steady state, but i've heard people say you can test more often.
    "Strength does not come from physical capacity.
    It comes from an indomitable will"-Mohandas K. Gandhi.

  7. #7
    jetronin is offline Senior Member
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    O.K. , I feel a little clarification is in order re. the "back to the wall" drill/test.

    The purpose of using the wall when assessing an overhead lockout is simply to make cheating the test really obvious. It's a base shoulder mobility test and those who already own a good healthy pair of shoulders will have no problems (barring obvious medical issues). I've used it on a few people of varying levels of mobility, and it seems a very good, clear way of identifying a lack of general shoulder mobility.

    The arch of the lower back isn't overly important, but i would recommend TRYING to press the low back into the wall. It's no possible when the heels, glutes, shoulder blades and back of head are pressed against the wall, but the act of trying keeps the arch nice and shallow.
    Again though, it's not that important, as the wall simply immobilizes the upper back to stop cheating by leaning back.

    I don't yet have the luxury of having tested it on hundreds of clients as i've not long started working as a p.t. but from the limited feedback i have, the test seems to work and above all, it's a safe way to measure mobility without equipment etc.
    "Strength does not come from physical capacity.
    It comes from an indomitable will"-Mohandas K. Gandhi.

  8. #8
    305pelusa Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by jetronin View Post
    Your lower back will arch a little, that's fine. Try pressing your low back into the wall. It's simply not do-able. It's more a test of good shoulder mobility than a drill. And if you do L-sit,Tuck planche,advanced tuck front levers, STW HS and german hang, then you don't need the test. Your shoulder mobility will be better than average.

    BTW, how are you liking the steady state G.B. workouts, and how long do you run a cycle before testing? Personally i like a 6 week cycle of steady state, but i've heard people say you can test more often.
    The stomach-to-wall handstands especially does an amazing job at opening the shoulders.

    And thanks for the complete clarification. I was asking because Sommers does have athletes complete lock-outs at the top with their lower-backs in contact with the wall, but that takes years of mobility work. Which is why when I saw it as one of the tests I was like "but this is soooooo much harder than a squat or toe-touch!"

    Videos of the so-called Wall-extension:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d6V2E...layer_embedded

    Coach says that his lower back, all of his arms, shoulder blades, etc are in contact with the wall. You can't fully tell, but I do believe that these kids, after years of practice, would be able to do it.

    I LOVE the SSC. I did not think results would be as good as they were last time I tested.
    It's recommended to keep the cycle for 8-12 weeks, depending on how hard you are working. If by the 8th week, you still feel the workout is too hard, then you keep extending it.

    You are allowed, however, to do a bit of mini-testing every 4 weeks (at the middle of the SSC so to speak). This is mostly for those skills where you do not need a full 8 weeks to get the joints up-to-par.
    So while you would wait 8 weeks with the main ones like Planches, Front levers, Back Levers, L-sits, Straddle-Ls and Manna work, you can definitely add more HS volume every 4 weeks for instance. In my case, in about 2 weeks, I will be adding a bit more volume to my Hollow holds, a bit more lean on my Planche leans, and switching from German Hangs (which was done for 4 weeks just to prepare my shoulders for the Back Lever stuff) to Tucked Back Levers.

    Again, thanks for your clarification though!

  9. #9
    Mitchcumstein is offline Member
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    Default

    Good article. Just tried arm bars for the first time, I've owned Resilient for a few months, but never done any ofthe drills. I think I'm lacking shoulder mobility in my right shoulder, as I can't get all the way over onto my stomach with the kb in my right hand. I'll do a fewe each day, see if things improve.

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