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  1. #1
    Ideal Paradigm is offline Senior Member
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    Default Average Price and good place to find bumper plates?

    Does anyone know of a good company or place that sells bumper plates for an affordable price? Most the places I have seen online are very expensive, usually $1.50 a pound or higher. On craigslist, I have had a very hard time finding any type of bumper plates.

  2. #2
    ad5ly is offline Senior Member
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    New BPs is way too expensive. I am a believer in getting the the best tools for what ever your passion is. Like DD kettlebells for instance. But looking around on the internet I was astounded at what they are asking for in store bought Bumper Plates. I never knew how expensive they actually were until you asked. I'll just stick to the Standard steel plates myself - Even I have limits. You may get lucky if you check craiglist etc..periodically. Ask around on this and other forums if anyone is selling theirs. Good Luck...Dennis

  3. #3
    Ideal Paradigm is offline Senior Member
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    The cheapest I could find were $1.50/lb on Craigslist. Not only that, but I'm considering starting some light olympic lifting, and I've read that it's much better to use bumper plates rather than steel plates, as it's bad to drop the steel plates.

    I'm going to eventually build my own lifting platform as well, as there are many DIY guides online for some good platforms.

  4. #4
    Rich in Nor Cal is offline Senior Member
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    I think it might be better to consider double kbells instead of bumpers. Kbells might not have the flexibility of plate-loaded barbells, but they are more durable, have other unique advantages, are more portable, and by buying them in their graduated sizes they are flexible enough.

    First, bumper plates at $1.50/lb aren't true bumpers, they are "practice" bumpers. True bumper plates cost about $10.00/lb and up. Practice bumpers use a brass or steel sleeve that is thin and easily warped (warping is the beginning of the end for them, and will eventually make them unusable). The best warranty on them is a one-year, and that was for the more expensive, steel-sleeved practice bumpers (they run closer to twice the cost of the cheaper brass-sleeved ones), and that warranty is void if the ring is warped by not having the bumpers held in place tightly. Most don't even offer a one-year warranty. Also, the rubber can crack, inevitable eventually under the best of conditions if they are dropped from heights, and will crack faster when mixed with steel plates. The lack of a substantial warranty should tell you something about their expected lifespan.

    Don't forget to buy a good bar, at least a $100, and really you need to spend at least $150 for a durable bar that will be good for power cleans and military snatches, and more if you want to do the true Olympic lifts like a double-dip C&J. Cheap bars will fall apart in weeks if you drop them from heights with any substantial weights on them.

    Kbells are far more durable, a bargain compared to the real cost of bumper plates (think replacing bumpers every two or three years). And if you are going off on vacation or just for a day at the beach, can you load up your Oly bar and bumpers in the back of your Prius and tote them out to the woods or the beach or a thousand miles to your sister's? No, they are far more cumbersome, easily harmed by rough surfaces and dirt (and even too much sunlight), and so on, so they best stay in your house or garage.

    Kbells can also be used for a wider variety of exercises, like the TGU, windmills, etc. as well as unilateral Oly lifts, besides the bilateral ones. Good ones will last a lifetime and beyond. You can take one or two easily on vacations or trips. And as far as dropping them, they can be dropped into the back swing of the snatch or clean. They can be used for singles, or for multiple reps, for endurance work as well as strength.

    As for weight progression, the traditional breaks of 1/2 poods (about 8kg) is perfect. According to El Hewie in "The Essentials of Weightlifting and Strength Training," the ideal increment for progression in the Oly lifts is between 10 and 20 kgs, so an 8kg break between kbell singles would be a 16kg break for doubles.

    I think the Oly lifts are wonderful exercises, but if you're on a tight budget, you might consider kbell doubles instead.

  5. #5
    md corral is offline Senior Member
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    Rich/ others- I've got standard plates and would love to drop my deadlifts at times. But I don't want to break my weights or mess up my garage floor.

    Any thoughts about something easy to setup or use to allow dropping standard plates without too much damage or noise?

    I was thinking about buying a couple bumper plates and using them along with standard plates to drop the deadlift.

  6. #6
    kodo kb is offline Senior Member
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    Sorry Ideal Paradigm, I don't know where you could get bumper plates cheep. Instead of trying to get the plates cheep, are there any gyms near you that have them? I know gyms like that are becoming more and more of a rarity, but it might be the best solution if you can find one close to home. (Sorry if you've already thought of this.)

    md coral, a good rubber mat should do the trick for deadlifts, however, I'm guessing you want something a bit more heavy duty. First place some thick plywood on four tires of the same size. Place two 2x4s or something similar on the edges of the plywood to create two lips parallel to length of the barbell, and then place a rubber mat on top. (The lips should not be under the mat, but surrounding two of its edges). I got this idea straight from PTTP, and haven't tried it out myself, but I imagine it'll be more than enough.

    Good luck to both of you,
    Josh
    "I can't imagine how it WON'T work...save you not doing it." — Dan John

    "I never went to the gym to "work out". Rather I went to LEARN. The workout was incidental." — Dr. Ed Thomas

  7. #7
    geoplaten is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by md corral View Post
    Rich/ others- I've got standard plates and would love to drop my deadlifts at times. But I don't want to break my weights or mess up my garage floor.

    Any thoughts about something easy to setup or use to allow dropping standard plates without too much damage or noise?

    I was thinking about buying a couple bumper plates and using them along with standard plates to drop the deadlift.
    In one of PAvel's books - I think PTTP - he describes a setup recommended by Marty Gallagher. IIRC, it was a large board on bottom, 4 tires of equal width next, topped by another large thick board, with 2 x 4s nailed to the sides. Apologies if I've missed something.

  8. #8
    Opus is offline Junior Member
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    A good idea for affordable bumper plates is to just use steel plates and get some foam pipe insulation and put it around the outer edge of the metal plate. It is already split down the middle and slips on easily with a little duct tape to hold it tightly in place. The padding will protect your plates and bar.

  9. #9
    md corral is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by geoplaten View Post
    In one of PAvel's books - I think PTTP - he describes a setup recommended by Marty Gallagher. IIRC, it was a large board on bottom, 4 tires of equal width next, topped by another large thick board, with 2 x 4s nailed to the sides. Apologies if I've missed something.
    Thanks! I did see that in PTTP. I'm too lazy to drag that rig in and out of my garage since I also park my car there :] But appreciate the idea.

  10. #10
    md corral is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Opus View Post
    A good idea for affordable bumper plates is to just use steel plates and get some foam pipe insulation and put it around the outer edge of the metal plate. It is already split down the middle and slips on easily with a little duct tape to hold it tightly in place. The padding will protect your plates and bar.
    This might work for me! Thanks for the idea.

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