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  1. #1
    Emby is offline Senior Member
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    Default Where to get a bBlood screen in the UK

    Hi All,

    I see regularly on here and various other places many of you folks in the US have Blood tests/screens and get results on Glucose, cholesterol, hormone levels etc. Im in the UK and would like to have a screen like this but going to the doctor they always want a reason as it costs the good old NHS money.

    Bupa dont seem to do it.

    Does anyone in the UK where you can get a screen done privately? I am just curious to see what my blood markers are like.

    Cheers,

    Martin

  2. #2
    Mitchcumstein is offline Member
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    I perform these tests for a living, but unfortunately for you, for the NHS! How old are you Martin? You may be able to get an NHS doc to request some tests for you, especially if your getting on a little. Any private doc will request any test you ask for, however it will cost you n arm and a leg. MY advice to you would be to only have a blood test for a good reason, e.g. a sympton. Having a whole battery of tests performed is typically done in America because of the fear of litigation, as well as the fact that the docs are paid to do them.

  3. #3
    Mitchcumstein is offline Member
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    Forgot to mention - some chemists will do your urine glucose, and there are various home kits you can buy to test various markers.

  4. #4
    Mitchcumstein is offline Member
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  5. #5
    Emby is offline Senior Member
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    Default

    Thanks Mitchumstein,

    Im 32 and have no Symptoms of anything. Just was very interested in getting it done as you can tell a lot about your health, where you may need to change etc especially in relation to cholesterol - Will get one of those kits but they arent very accurate are they?

    Thanks

    Martin

  6. #6
    Mitchcumstein is offline Member
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    Go to your GP, tell him your mum/dad has a high cholesterol, I'm positive he will request the test for you. Question is, if its high, what do you then do? Dietary cholesterol has a very low effect on serum cholesterol leverls (unless you have familial hypercholesterolaemia), so theres no point in changing your diet, and unless you have other coronary heart disease risk factors, you wont be given, or need statins.

    My advice? Dont smoke, do exercise, don't eat too much crap, dont go mad with the booze. If your fit and well, don't go looking for markers that would suggest otherwise.

  7. #7
    bwwm is offline Senior Member
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    I'm actually shocked they won't readily do one. Most HMOs in the US will cover 1-2 tests per year for this blood work. Granted a significant number of Americans have poor numbers, so the HMOs have a vested interest in addressing it sooner rather than later.

    I think I might disagree with @Mitchcumstein to a certain extent. Myself and others I know have been able to drive a big change in triglycerides and total cholesterol by reducing the amount of carbohydrates in the diet. Exercise is also a big lever as well. So I think that one can do something about it if the blood tests come back less desirable. I agree however that simply eating less foods with cholesterol or eating foods with lower cholesterol will not have the desired effect.

    The other thing I noticed was that a few years ago, when I was doing ETK Program Minimum in the morning, that made an improvement in my insulin sensitivity numbers (my chol numbers were already good). Then later there was some mention in a news article that some studies had been published suggesting working out in the morning before breakfast has such an effect.

  8. #8
    Mitchcumstein is offline Member
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    Interesting to see that you managed to reduce your trigs with reduced carbs, been reading a lot lately about fructose and trig levels. Just wondering how you measured insulin sensitivity? Did you have a glucose tolerance test?

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