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  1. #1
    menging is offline Member
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    Default Bodyweight training methods - Two contrasts

    I assume some of you know who Hannibal for King is. For those who don't, youtube him..

    The way that he trains. 7 days a week in hard calisthenics, defies a lot of the general training lore out there, especially wade's. Yet, he is one of the best calisthenics experts i know. Shouldn't he be monstrously overtrained? What would be pros and cons of this kind of training? And how different would your body and strength/endurance levels become in training this way opposed to the CC way?

    I'm asking because I like the hannibal method of training better than the cc way. I feel the cc way to be too regulated, in hannibals method you just do a bunch of calisthenics for fun.

  2. #2
    Chris Hansen is offline Senior Member
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    I have some thoughts, they're only thoughts though so I'd be interested in the input of others.

    Just because he <can> workout every day, doesn't necessarily mean it's the program that will result in the fastest progress for him.

    Hannibal probably has built up a huge amount of work capacity. The human body can adapt to a lot of things but it takes time to build up to that kind of volume. I'm guessing that he built enough strength to do those things long ago and he's developed a lot of endurance as well.

    If you follow a bodybuilding type split routine, you could train every day but won't necessarily be working the same muscles every time.

    It's relative. If doing 100 pushups is no challenge for you, you could probably do it every day. If you max out at 10 pushups, you could probably do 6-8 every day with no problem.
    Last edited by Chris Hansen; 02-12-2012 at 05:39 AM.

  3. #3
    LoneRider is offline Member
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    I routinely do both Convict Conditioning and Frequency Method Calisthenics (the latter is a carryover from the Greyskull Linear Progression, a lifting, fasted walking, and calisthenics program I did for six months last year). I follow the Veterano program and I do the following calisthenics throughout the day:

    - 3 x 30 Pushups
    - 3 x 11 Pullups
    - 3 x 7 Rowers (new Army PT test exercise)

    I typically listen to my body and cut back on sets or take a complete rest day for frequency method calisthenics depending on the day. But the sets for me are recoverable within an hour or so.

  4. #4
    speaker is offline Senior Member
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    just for clarity, are the above sets a total for the day? 3 sets push and pull/daily.

  5. #5
    Al_Kavadlo is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Hansen View Post
    I have some thoughts, they're only thoughts though so I'd be interested in the input of others.

    Just because he <can> workout every day, doesn't necessarily mean it's the program that will result in the fastest progress for him.

    Hannibal probably has built up a huge amount of work capacity. The human body can adapt to a lot of things but it takes time to build up to that kind of volume. I'm guessing that he built enough strength to do those things long ago and he's developed a lot of endurance as well.

    If you follow a bodybuilding type split routine, you could train every day but won't necessarily be working the same muscles every time.

    It's relative. If doing 100 pushups is no challenge for you, you could probably do it every day. If you max out at 10 pushups, you could probably do 6-8 every day with no problem.
    Great post - I concur. I talk a bit about the pros and cons of training calisthenics every day in my forthcoming book.

  6. #6
    szorn is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by menging View Post
    I assume some of you know who Hannibal for King is. For those who don't, youtube him..

    The way that he trains. 7 days a week in hard calisthenics, defies a lot of the general training lore out there, especially wade's. Yet, he is one of the best calisthenics experts i know. Shouldn't he be monstrously overtrained? What would be pros and cons of this kind of training? And how different would your body and strength/endurance levels become in training this way opposed to the CC way?

    I'm asking because I like the hannibal method of training better than the cc way. I feel the cc way to be too regulated, in hannibals method you just do a bunch of calisthenics for fun.
    I am not sure how Hannibal trains but I have read several interviews from George HIT Richards of Calisthenic Kingz and he claims to workout every day as well. However, according to the interviews he follows an upper/Lower split routine. Hitting the upper body one day and the lower body the next. It's possible that Hannibal trains the same exact exercises at the same intensity level every single day but I highly doubt it. My guess is that he follows a similar program to HIT Richards or at the very least he likely varies the exercises each day such as rows one day and pull-ups the next.

    Noone says that we can't exercise the same muscles every day. However, common sense tells us that we should vary the exercises and/or the level of intensity in order to prevent issues.

    Steve

  7. #7
    Samuel is offline Senior Member
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    A novel idea: If you like the idea, try it and see what happens. Be objective about your progress after 8 weeks, and then modify slightly and continue. You may very well respond better to high frequency training; on the other hand, your body might hate it despite how much your mind loves the idea. Just see what happens.

  8. #8
    menging is offline Member
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    Thanks for inputs!

    I will try it and see what happens. It is worth mentioning, that Hannibal have said he started working calisthenics 18 years ago.. So he had some time building up. Whats strange and kinda annoys me, is that he seems to only have worked the basic pullup, pushup and dips. Who knows how strong he could have been.

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