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  1. #11
    CWheeler is offline Senior Member
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    GTG is meant to develop the skill of strength by keeping you as fresh as possible by deviding the work into smaller manageable doses spread throughout the day, and throughout the week. You are never meant to feel worked. Think of 1 set every 30 minutes totaling about 60 reps using 50% of your lifting weight.

    The Bear is the opposite. It is meant to move as much iron as possible in the shortest amount of time. This taxes the system so much that you need a couple of days to recover (eat, sleep and grow!) Think of doing 60 reps in 20 minutes trying to maximumize the most possible tonnage.

    To me it seems clear that the two are mutually exclusive.

    What does work is do GTG for a cycle first (a la PttP). Stay fresh, get strong. Then follow it up with Bear to get big using the big weights you worked up to with the previous cycle.

  2. #12
    kbSagoo is offline Senior Member
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    Yes, this makes sense to me. So if you work a PTTP cycle for several weeks starting at x lbs working your way to y lbs. When starting the Bear:
    1st set = y lbs
    2nd set = .9y lbs
    3rd thru n sets = .8y lbs

    I'm probably reading into it too much, but I'm interpreting the suggestion of 2 sets of GTG then bear all in the same workout.

    Quote Originally Posted by CWheeler View Post
    What does work is do GTG for a cycle first (a la PttP). Stay fresh, get strong. Then follow it up with Bear to get big using the big weights you worked up to with the previous cycle.

  3. #13
    CWheeler is offline Senior Member
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    hmm... could GtG be the wrong term used. Maybe Ladders would be the proper term?

    I think I remember an article by Dan John on T-Nation where he listed something about doing ladders but calling it GTG. It was suggested doing 2-3-5-2-3-5....2-3-5-2-3
    You use the same weight throughout. You keep going through the ladders until your form breaks down on one of the sets of 5. You then finish up with a set of 2 and 3 because you should be able to stay in good form.

  4. #14
    Chris Hansen is offline Senior Member
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    It seems that you would either do ladders or the Bear but doing both in the same workout would be entirely too much. Keep in mind that the Bear involves 10-20 fairly heavy sets of an exercise.

  5. #15
    Boswick is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by CWheeler View Post
    Pavel's bear: one push and one pull exercise. Both must be a big compund exercise. 90%,80%,all other sets 70-75% until form degrades. You keep the same two exercises for the duration of the cycle.

    Staley's EDT: A1/A2, B1/B2 (maybe C1/C2) each grouping for 10 minutes. You have Day1 and Day2 (maybe day3) exercises. Read Muscle Logic by Charles Staley for more info.

    The web program was written at a time when people were trying to add their own twist on popular programs by combining them. Some of them really worked, others didn't. I saw this years ago, but never gave it a go. I've done both EDT and the Bear. Each gave me different results from one another. Give it a go and let us know how it worked out for you.
    Right. So if my routine looked like this:

    Bench
    Rows
    Sqauts

    2 heavy sets of 5, as many sets as possible at 80%. This would qualify as a 'bear' routine, right? And so would the same setup with OHP, Chins, and Deadlifts, right? (What is written in PTTP.) Why is rotating these two workouts A/B style not considered the bear routine? I'm missing your logic. Also i'll totally bump this thread in a month or two and let you guys know how it goes.
    Started the 10,000 swing challenge July 31st.
    Current total: 6,375. 8/22.

  6. #16
    kbSagoo is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boswick View Post
    Why is rotating these two workouts A/B style not considered the bear routine? I'm missing your logic. Also i'll totally bump this thread in a month or two and let you guys know how it goes.
    I believe the difference is this is Mahler interpretation of the Bear vs what Pavel wrote about the Bear in PTTP. If I recall PTTP, there was probably a page devoted to the Bear. To me, it was vague on if you were to perform the upper body work in the same way as the deadlifts, mulitple sets of 80%.

    I have seen posts from others where they perform the Bear by doing multiple sets of 80% on the deadlift since it is the big lift that is stimulating growth all over. Any upper body work was done 2-3X5.

  7. #17
    Wolfeye is offline Senior Member
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    As I understand it, the Russian Bear is doing 10-20 sets of 5 at about 80% of your ability, with 1 or 2 minutes rest. I'm saying to do 2 sets of 5 of something you can barely do (GTG), then do the Bear after that, because the the GTG warmed you up.

  8. #18
    kbSagoo is offline Senior Member
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    No, read PttP again...you already do straight PttP for the 1st 2 sets then start doing multiple sets at 80%. It would be somewhat overkill by doing 2 extra heavy sets to get warmed up...the key to the Bear is to maximize volume.

    I'm still confused as to how GtG is being applied. Per Naked Warrior, GtG is to do multiple sets throughout the day, moderately heavy resistance, half the reps than what was used for the max. If I was applying GtG to the deadlift, I would take my 5RM and do 1-2 reps sets spread throughout the day.

    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfeye View Post
    As I understand it, the Russian Bear is doing 10-20 sets of 5 at about 80% of your ability, with 1 or 2 minutes rest. I'm saying to do 2 sets of 5 of something you can barely do (GTG), then do the Bear after that, because the the GTG warmed you up.

  9. #19
    Chris Hansen is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfeye View Post
    As I understand it, the Russian Bear is doing 10-20 sets of 5 at about 80% of your ability, with 1 or 2 minutes rest.
    The 80% is from set 3 until the end of the workout. The 80% is based on your first set which would be 20% heavier.

    If I remember, Mahler's article on the Bear was using kettlebells which aren't adjustable but he went with the concept of doing multiple sets of 5.

  10. #20
    CWheeler is offline Senior Member
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    @Boswick
    You listed 6 exercises. The Bear is limited to only two. It is meant to be a very simple but effective routine. It is meant to build on top of PttP. You do not change the exercise, only the programming of them. This means you do not have to waste time/energy learning new skills. Just apply what you have already been doing in a different set/rep scheme.

    @Wolfeye
    Sorry bro, you seem to have misunderstood what GtG is. You need to re-read the Naked Warrior. Pavel's "Drop and Give Me 100" pushup program is an awesome example of Grease the Groove.

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