The world’s premier network for those seeking to share and discuss high-impact,high results, super practical information for the developmentof superiorphysical performance.
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12
  1. #1
    mettleman is offline Banned
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    1,141
    Blog Entries
    388

    Default First walk with 80 lb weighted vest - questions/concerns

    Hello Friends,

    I just took my newly purchased weighted vest for a spin and it brought up a number of issues I thought that I'd ask all of you on:

    I have done a tone of alpine mountaineering here in Colorado and know what it is like to be under a significant load. With a well balanced and properly fitting pack, all of the weight is resting on the hips, putting nearly all of the work into the legs. The vest that I purchased (ZFO Sport, 80lbls) does exactly what a good pack should not; that is, it puts ALL of the weight on the shoulders. After just moments of walking my traps were burning like crazy. I still finished the walk, but the weakest link was definitely the traps, with nearly no other perceived exertion in the rest of my body.

    What gives here? I want the vest to work my legs and torso I'll do farmers walks or jump shrugs, if I want to exert my traps. But having my shoulders be the limiting factor is a royal bummer since they will never be able to match the work of the legs - which is where I want to feel the pain.

    Another concern is that, keeping the traps as relaxed as absolutely possible, the vest seems to be stretching those muscles and depressing my shoulders. I don't know, maybe this is a good thing, or maybe it will lead to problems down the road. Ant advice on if having 80 lbs depressing the shoulder is a good thing or not?

    I did like (love) the compression on the chest and how hard I can feel my upper rib cage/breathing muscles working. This was a good thing since I do BJJ and often try to stimulate the feeling of breathing under heavy weight (like an opponent wrapping you up in a side mount). For this I have often done TGUs with a 120 lb sandbag, "resting" with the bag on my chest between reps. The vest isn't nearly as intense but still has a similar effect.

    I suppose that i can rig up a very thick and secure belt for the vest to rest on, putting most of the weight on the hips - but I was wondering what others' thoughts were on these issues...

    Thanks in advance for any input!
    MM

  2. #2
    JLB
    JLB is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    327

    Default

    As long as you're not walking around with the vest hours during the day there is no reason to expect some permanent depression of the shoulders. I believe you're overthinking this, if the weight is on your shoulders, it isn't just your shoulders getting the workout, your legs and torso are too.

  3. #3
    JDube18 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Crestview, FL
    Posts
    4

    Default

    Dont worry, your traps will get stronger and pain in them is just a minor inconvenience. Ive done weeks of 3 days on 2 days off moving about 15-20 kilometers a day with a 100-110 lb ruck and 30-40 lbs on the LBE, plus weapon. It really sucks at first but it never takes long to get used to it and you get strong fast. Just keep stretching, keep the pace slow to moderate at first, take rest when you need it and listen to your body.

  4. #4
    Wolfeye is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    944

    Default

    Good job with the sandbag (I've done it with similar weight & it's a pretty good exercise). I've also done the same thing with it resting on my chest. Wouldn't figure that shoulder depression thing you were talking about would be a good thing. Might do damage to the tissues, themselves, instead of making them stronger (if you''re doing them all the time). Have no idea why you would feel the workout in your traps, but not your legs. If you can, car pushing might be a good idea (definitely feel it in your legs), but it seems sometimes there's nonsensical traffic laws about having a non-operational vehicle on the street. Not too sure of this & it doesn't seem like someone would be doing it in traffic, anyway- but not all laws reflect reality.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    SE Pennsylvania
    Posts
    71

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JDube18 View Post
    Dont worry, your traps will get stronger and pain in them is just a minor inconvenience. Ive done weeks of 3 days on 2 days off moving about 15-20 kilometers a day with a 100-110 lb ruck and 30-40 lbs on the LBE, plus weapon. It really sucks at first but it never takes long to get used to it and you get strong fast. Just keep stretching, keep the pace slow to moderate at first, take rest when you need it and listen to your body.
    I'm curious about something because I've really only heard anecdotal evidence regarding this... a lot (and I mean a lot) of heavy rucking will cause spinal compression, regardless of how well-fitting the ruck is. My brother and several others I know came out of their 4+ years in the Army quite a bit shorter (in my brother's case, he lost about an inch of height). Now, maybe this had something also to do with the frequency he parachuted, or heck, maybe it's just a coincidence. But I'm wondering if any of you all have heard of this or if you could point me in the direction of any studies that have been done that refute or support that spinal compression hypothesis.

    I assume that the amount of rucking that would do that would have to be astronomical since I've done a lot of backpacking myself (not with much more than 45 - 60 lbs) and never experienced lasting problems. But yes, definitely some soreness in the traps, even though I had the extra hip strap settled correctly on my hip area.

  6. #6
    RJ79 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    490

    Default

    Mettleman I used an 80lb vest for a short time and experienced largely the same things you did. I hated how it literally hung on my traps and loved how it made it harder to breathe due to the compression. I didn't use it long enough to figure out whether the upper back/trap discomfort would go away. It didn't feel very natural and there are umpteen ways to skin a cat.

  7. #7
    JDube18 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Crestview, FL
    Posts
    4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by christinemooney View Post
    I'm curious about something because I've really only heard anecdotal evidence regarding this... a lot (and I mean a lot) of heavy rucking will cause spinal compression, regardless of how well-fitting the ruck is. My brother and several others I know came out of their 4+ years in the Army quite a bit shorter (in my brother's case, he lost about an inch of height). Now, maybe this had something also to do with the frequency he parachuted, or heck, maybe it's just a coincidence. But I'm wondering if any of you all have heard of this or if you could point me in the direction of any studies that have been done that refute or support that spinal compression hypothesis.

    I assume that the amount of rucking that would do that would have to be astronomical since I've done a lot of backpacking myself (not with much more than 45 - 60 lbs) and never experienced lasting problems. But yes, definitely some soreness in the traps, even though I had the extra hip strap settled correctly on my hip area.
    In my opinion it will depend on a few different things. How much are you eating and sleeping while rucking that much? Ranger school is 2 MRE's a day at the max, so there is more of a chance of problems when you dont consume enough/sleep enough to repair yourself. How good of shape are you in? I know the guys that are less conditioned and not as strong tend to suffer nagging injuries a lot. The big and tall guys also tend to have an easier time. That isnt to say that smaller guys dont do fine, Im only 5'9" and 165.

    Im not saying that it doesnt compress your spine and possibly make you shorter, Ive just never seen it, nor have I really done a before and after height check. Im also not saying that moving that far with that much weight is a good idea. I have only done it when I had to(schools mostly). A normal training ruck for me is usually around 50 lbs dry(before adding 4 quarts water) and I try to keep the distances short(4-6 miles) and the pace fast (10-13 min/mile). I think its a great workout but it can come at a price eventually so when I have a choice I only ruck once a week at the most.

  8. #8
    Wolfeye is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    944

    Default

    I'd say being loaded down with that much weight (what was it 140-150 lbs?) would make things a problem. If that's done consistently, that'll probably screw you up. It seems a lot of people have training injuries in the army. That thing about not working out when you're younger sounds like bullshit ("becasue it'll stunt your growth"), but sustained weight might be an issue. An idea might be to actually try a rucksack, maybe it'll make a difference.

  9. #9
    Steve Freides is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    7,649

    Default

    I'm not familiar with this vest, but many (most?) weighted vests allow you to adjust the weight - 80 lbs. seems like an awful lot to use your first time out.

    For weight resting on your chest, try repetition kettlebell jerks. For a real barrel of laughs, rack a pair of kettlebells and go for a walk.
    -S-
    Steve Freides
    [url]http://www.kbnj.com[/url]
    [url]http://RideChickens.blogspot.com[/url]

  10. #10
    Raptor is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    306

    Default

    I believe Steve Justa made a 100 # vest that he wore 8 hours a day while working his job. But that guy is a sort of mutant individual. Something us mere mortals would have to build up to.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Free Course
Close