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Thread: Value of FMS?

  1. #1
    realath is offline Member
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    Default Value of FMS?

    I was thinking of signing up to become a Function Movement Specialist instructor. I'm already a certified personal trainer (NASM) but not having much luck with gyms, or even the public. I thought this extra certification might help. Any thoughts?

  2. #2
    Boris Bachmann is offline Senior Member
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    Of course, I think an FMS qualification would be great, but have you asked gyms in the area what they are looking for as far as qualifications?

    What is "the public" looking for in your area?

    What are your strengths and weaknesses as a trainer? What could you do to better reach those that would benefit from your strengths? What weaknesses could you shore up to better help potential clientele?
    Boris Bachmann
    [url]http://squatrx.blogspot.com/[/url]

  3. #3
    JSStevensRKC is offline Senior Member
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    People won't flock to you because of any certification... It's about the results you get with the tools you have.

    Personally, FMS helps me provide better results.
    John Scott Stevens, RKC II, CK-FMS
    [URL="www.OmahaEliteKettlebell.com"]Omaha Elite Kettlebell[/URL]

    [URL="https://www.facebook.com/OmahaEliteKettlebell"]https://www.facebook.com/OmahaEliteKettlebell[/URL]

  4. #4
    lol
    lol is offline Member
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    I agree...folks could care less what certs you have...they want results.

    Anyway, here's some interesting things about the FMS from Anoop, who happens to be a pretty bright dude.

    http://www.exercisebiology.com/index...ally_a_screen/

    This info has probably been posted several times on this site...sorry to post it again.
    Last edited by lol; 03-21-2012 at 07:30 AM.

  5. #5
    UKS&C is offline Junior Member
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    Lol,

    Great link and a very interesting read

    Thanks,

    Ste.

  6. #6
    lol
    lol is offline Member
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    One other thing...you can have more degrees than a compass, but if you have no personality, that might hinder your chances of landing clients too. Of course, you don't want to be a ball in high grass either...lost when it comes to exercise and diet...just my opinion.

  7. #7
    Samuel is offline Senior Member
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    I find a few of Anoop's arguments extremely uncompelling:
    When someone scores less than the cut-off score in the FMS, you tell them that your chance of getting injured is extremely high. This is a great way to get someone move less or have fear of movement
    First of all, risk of injury may be higher, but there is absolutely no reason to say "extremely high". This 'problem' is easily solved by not being a shitty communicator with your clients.

    Frequency & Severity: The importance of any screen will depend on the frequency and the severity of the problem. When FMS is used on lay people, you have to ask what is the severity and frequency of injuries. In NFL FMS study, 13 people out of 46 got injured in 4.5 months (28 in 100). For the lay people, we might get 1-5 injuries out of 100 people in 1-3 years!
    That depends on how you define "lay people" and who those 100 subjects are. I have four older brothers, all of whom engage in recreational sport. Two of them get injured regularly, countless times a year. Injuries are also common enough (certainly more than 1-5% over 1-3 years) in friends who play casual sport. Now, as for my friends who sit on their arses all day and don't do anything? Well, sure, they don't get injured. But I probably wouldn't give them an FMS screen either. The point is to screen people who are active, or beginning activity - and either I have the most dysfunctional friends and family ever, or those potential injury statistics of his are vastly underestimated.

    In the FMS study for NFL players, the sensitivity was 46%. That means out of 100 people who will get injured, the test only identified 46 of them correctly, which is less for a screening test. A screening test needs high sensitivity (90%) because we want to identify as many people with the disease because we think this disease is of such importance that people need to be screened for.
    This assumes that all injury is caused by the same thing (i.e. dysfunctional movement patterns and asymmetry, which is what the FMS is screening for), which is obviously not the case. But aside from that, personally if I had any group of athletes and could reduce injuries by 46% I'd be pretty damn happy about it. Wouldn't you?

    Cost Vs Benefit: If we finally “prove that FMS indeed predicts injuries and prevents”, what is the cost vs benefits here? Imagine your client comes to get in shape as most lay people do. You do the FMS, finds dysfunctions, and tell them that their likelihood of getting injured is high. Though that wasn’t their goal or priority, you make them go through the FMS screen fixers for 10-15 minutes for which they have to pay 50-100 dollars an hour.
    I don't know many people who define "in shape" as "limping around and still fat because I got injured". This is just common sense: 10 minutes is not a lot of time spent to reduce injury risk. Plus, if you're a good trainer, you can program this very sensibly and effectively. Put the correctives into the warmup (speaking of warmups, isn't that 10-15 minutes of time spent trying to reduce the chance of injury in the session? We should get rid of that on Anoop's logic), or during the rest period between other exercises. I'm particularly a fan of the latter.

    I would also add that there is more research than he references (either due to his ignorance or it coming out after that post was published). As just two examples, an interesting study showed that of Marine officer candidates who were screened on intake, those with a score of <14 were twice as likely not to graduate due to injury as those with a score of >14. I also remember hearing a while back from I think it was Alwyn Cosgrove that there was a study that showed improving FMS scores led to increased fat loss in regular folks. I need to track that one down though.


    On the original topic - I agree with what Boris and John have said. Getting FMS certified probably won't make people hire you, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't do it either. But maybe in the short term you need to focus on how you can get work, and once you have that settled add the FMS to your toolkit. Depends on your priorities though.

  8. #8
    BJones RKC is offline Senior Member
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    Obviously my opinion on this will be very biased but I do think the FMS adds value to your services as a personal trainer.

    check FunctionalMovement.com
    for articles on the research, application, the exercise library etc.....

    Brett

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