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  1. #1
    udubber83 is offline Junior Member
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    Default Best FMS learning DVD?

    So I've searched around but can't really find a good DVD(s)..or book for that matter that goes through each of the functional movement screens, tells you what muscles are weak, tight, etc and the exercises to correct and how to make those exercises progressively harder. I'm just learning the FMS screen and have been looking at Gray Cook's videos on youtube but unsure where I can find these 7 screens that break down each segment of the body, show the weaknesses (knee adduction, etc) and corrections to fix it. I know he has a lot of DVD's out but unsure which one of these will go in dept for each screen.

    Thanks guys for any help!

  2. #2
    BJones RKC is offline Senior Member
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    Best advice if you are a trainer - get the book Movement and attend the course or do the home study course
    Get signed up on the Pro Site so you can input scores and get corrective strategies etc...

    Best advice if you are an individual - get screened by an FMS professional or CK-FMS pro, read athletic body in blance for the philosophy and corrective info but get screened

    Are you an individual trying to use the info on yourself or are you a Trainer looking to use it on clients?

    The idea behind corrective exercise is not to make it harder and harder but rather to correct the pattern and move on to good exercise programming and selection that will maintain good movement and progress strength etc....

  3. #3
    udubber83 is offline Junior Member
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    I'm studying to be a personal trainer and in our corrective movements class we used the FMS screen and corrections that go with it, but I would like a book or DVD that breaks it down more in depth. My teacher didn't have any idea of a good book or DVD that could do this. I might order the secrets of the shoulders, core, etc DVD's and see if Gray goes more into depth on each screen, compensations show, weak and overactive muscles, and corrective strategies.

    I heard he movement book doesn't go in depth for each of the screens, compensations, weaknesses, and how to correct them. Maybe I'm wrong though..

  4. #4
    BJones RKC is offline Senior Member
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    As a personal training student go with Movement, the Secrets of DVDs and take a course when you can

    Movement does not provide a "cookbook" approach but is principled based and teaches a great deal

  5. #5
    udubber83 is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by BJones RKC View Post
    As a personal training student go with Movement, the Secrets of DVDs and take a course when you can

    Movement does not provide a "cookbook" approach but is principled based and teaches a great deal
    So how is the layout of the secrets of DVD's? Does Gray go through each of the screens, point out issues and how to correct them? Thanks for the help!

  6. #6
    Samuel is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by udubber83 View Post
    I might order the secrets of the shoulders, core, etc DVD's and see if Gray goes more into depth on each screen, compensations show, weak and overactive muscles, and corrective strategies.

    I heard he movement book doesn't go in depth for each of the screens, compensations, weaknesses, and how to correct them. Maybe I'm wrong though..
    You're absolutely right that the Movement book doesn't go into that, because Gray Cook doesn't believe that it's the right approach at all. Here, let me give you a few excerpts to try and clarify:

    Quote Originally Posted by Movement, pp.18-19
    In mechanical science, one big item gets broken into manageable parts. That breakdown - called reductionism in science - often creates one perspective while destroying another. Just as bodies are destroyed by dissection, movement patterns are destroyed by reductionism. ... breaking down movement into isolated segments has not reduced our musculoskeletal injuries or made us fitter or leaner. ... At a dissected level, movement observation and categorization became organized and manageable, while consideration of fundamental whole movement patterns died.
    Conversely, patterns and sequences remain the preferred mode of operation in biological organisms. Patterns are groups of singular movements linked in the brain like a single chunk of information. This chunk essentially resembles a mental motor program, the software that governs movement patterns. A pattern represents multiple single movements used together for a specific function. ... Fundamental movements get stored in basic patterns, as do frequently produced movements. Although a scientist may want to look at a pattern's parts to enhance understanding, we as exercise and rehabilitation professionals must understand that the brain recognizes sequences and uses them to generate true function and realistic movement.
    Viewing the parts can give clarity, but viewing the patterns will produce a global understanding. Studying the details imparts movement intelligence, but understanding the patterns creates movement wisdom. For academic study, dissection is appropriate for terminal understanding. However, if the goal is to affect realistic and functional movement in a practical way, we can't stop at simple dissection, but instead must focus on reconstruction and reinforcement of whole movement patterns.
    And a bit clearer:
    Quote Originally Posted by Movement, pp.25-26
    This is a functional approach to movement rather than an anatomical approach. The anatomical approach follows basic kinesiology and is often complicated by assumptions in isolation. ...
    -What we view as weakness may be muscle inhibition.
    -The weakness in a prime mover might be the result of a dysfunctional stabilizer.
    -Poor function in an agonist may actually be problems with the antagonist.
    -What we view as tightness may be protective muscle tone, guarding and inadequate muscle coordination.
    -What we see as bad technique might be the only option for the individual performing poorly selected exercises.
    -What we see as low general fitness may be the extra metabolic demand produced by inferior neuromuscular coordination and compensation behavior.
    Strengthening, stretching, extra coaching and more exercise will not correct these problems. Making decisions on surface observations is the medical equivalent of treating the symptom and not the cause.
    Many professionals appreciate function and yet insist on an anatomical approach to exercise, training bodyparts instead of movement patterns. By the end of this book, you'll know how to focus on movement patterns, letting the bodyparts develop naturally, instead of zeroing in on bodyparts and expecting natural movement patterns to spontaneously emerge.
    And, perhaps the most explicit of all:
    Quote Originally Posted by Movement, p.219
    The three biggest and most frequent mistakes in the FMS and SFMA are-
    -Trying to convert movement dysfunction into singular anatomical problems, such as discussing isolated muscle weakness or tightness ...
    I hope this brings some clarity for you, but to really grasp the full picture you need to pick up Movement and give it a good read. Treating the FMS and correctives like a flowchart of "if X, then Y" without understanding the principles is always going to be missing the mark.

  7. #7
    udubber83 is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Samuel View Post
    You're absolutely right that the Movement book doesn't go into that, because Gray Cook doesn't believe that it's the right approach at all. Here, let me give you a few excerpts to try and clarify:



    And a bit clearer:


    And, perhaps the most explicit of all:


    I hope this brings some clarity for you, but to really grasp the full picture you need to pick up Movement and give it a good read. Treating the FMS and correctives like a flowchart of "if X, then Y" without understanding the principles is always going to be missing the mark.
    Those are all valid points. The only concern I have is the how not the what. I for the most part understand the Cook FMS, but if I were to put someone through it, I would still have a very tough time understanding bad movement patterns in the body and then fixing them by incorporating certain exercises in their workout.

    If something happens when someone squats (adducts knees, etc etc) what is the weakness, tightness, etc etc and how do you fix it. Clients look for that first and foremost. From a client's perspective, if I run them through a FMS, they want to know what is the purpose (which I understand) and then most importantly how to fix them. I need better practice on the how. I will buy the book but having a resource that gets into the technical aspect of the actual screens is what I'm looking for.

    thanks for your input btw.

  8. #8
    Samuel is offline Senior Member
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    I think you've missed the point, because the very premise of "what is the weakness, tightness, etc etc" in regards to adducting knees is the wrong question (read the third quote again - that is explicitly what NOT to do). What actually happens is "The knee is adducting, there is a problem with the squat pattern" but you don't care. Not at first. You look at all the other screens, and find the weakest link based on the hierarchy of screens (which is explained either in Movement or at a course if you attend one). The only time you address the squat is if it's the lowest score in the screen. But then, even if it so happens that the squat is the lowest score, it's still always just "there is a problem with the squat pattern", and while it may be influenced by weakness or tightness, it is not always the case, maybe not even usually. All we can possibly know right now is that there is some problem with the squat pattern. And it could be fixed purely by working on the pattern, not talking at all about weakness or tightness or overactive or underactive or anything.

    Again, get Movement first. Then as Brett said, the best adjunct to that is either the Secrets Of series (which yes, does give correctives for the screens) or going to a course (I haven't been, but as I understand it Level II covers more correctives while Level I is mostly just how to screen; so you might want to go to both Level I and II if possible).
    Last edited by Samuel; 04-12-2012 at 08:34 PM.

  9. #9
    udubber83 is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Samuel View Post
    I think you've missed the point, because the very premise of "what is the weakness, tightness, etc etc" in regards to adducting knees is the wrong question (read the third quote again - that is explicitly what NOT to do). What actually happens is "The knee is adducting, there is a problem with the squat pattern" but you don't care. Not at first. You look at all the other screens, and find the weakest link based on the hierarchy of screens (which is explained either in Movement or at a course if you attend one). The only time you address the squat is if it's the lowest score in the screen. But then, even if it so happens that the squat is the lowest score, it's still always just "there is a problem with the squat pattern", and while it may be influenced by weakness or tightness, it is not always the case, maybe not even usually. All we can possibly know right now is that there is some problem with the squat pattern. And it could be fixed purely by working on the pattern, not talking at all about weakness or tightness or overactive or underactive or anything.

    Again, get Movement first. Then as Brett said, the best adjunct to that is either the Secrets Of series (which yes, does give correctives for the screens) or going to a course (I haven't been, but as I understand it Level II covers more correctives while Level I is mostly just how to screen; so you might want to go to both Level I and II if possible).
    Thanks I think I will do that. The courses are too expensive right now for me. Would love to go to one though.

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