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  1. #1
    CoachDarren is offline Junior Member
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    Default PTP for intermeadiate lifter? Some questions.

    I did PTP several years ago. I'm a little stronger now. Should any changes be made to the basic 2 lift template for an intermeadiate lifter? Should a stronger lifter generally lean towards doing less days a week, 3 instead of 5?

    Is it okay to do 1-2 other lifts on maintenance once a week in additon to PTP?

    Does PTP professional build off the original template or is it a completely different program?

    Thanks for any replies.

  2. #2
    CoachDarren is offline Junior Member
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    Default I was afraid that this wouldn't get any responses.

    oh well......

  3. #3
    Spikeman1444 is offline Senior Member
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    Default

    I know nothing of PTTP but I will bump you so hopefully someone who does will reply.

  4. #4
    Steve W. is offline Senior Member
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    Default

    One reason you probably didn't get replies is that your question is very vague. What do you mean by intermediate? What are your goals? What other kinds of training, sports or physically demanding work are you doing? What kinds of cycles have you done previously? Have you hit a plateau and stopped making progress? Do you have a specific weakness that is holding you back? Etc.

    As for PTTP Pro, it doesn't really build off of the original template, nor is it really a program. It is a book of articles discussing many different advanced approaches, programs and techniques for the powerlifts and the overhead press.

    It's very interesting, and a lot of the technique discussion would probably benefit anyone who does these lifts. But most of the programming is not necessarily directly applicable except for more advanced competitive lifters. And it's definitely a "more than one way to skin a cat" type of book, rather than the "do this" type like the original PTTP. If you already suffer from information overload, this book won't help.
    In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice, there is.

    Just because it happened to you doesn't make it interesting.

  5. #5
    powerlifter54 is offline Senior Member
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    Default

    Coach D,

    Yes you can.

    Take a look at the Easy Stength template. 2-3X a week, 2 lifts pushing 80-95%weights, 10 reps total per drill in sets of 2-5 reps, approximately 5 minute rest periods.

    Then look at Even Easier Strength, up to 5X a week, 2 lifts pushing 40-80% weights, 10 reps total but can do them all in one set, short rest periods.

    THEN LOOK AT THE 40 DAY PLAN. 5 exercises. The deadlift, an upper body press, and upper body pull hint:chins or pullups, a full body explosive movement with KB, and a heavy ab movement. 5-7 days a week at your choice. Warmup with Goblet or overhead squats. Go as heavy or as light as you feel each day. 2 sets of 5 in DL, push and pull, and 1 set of 20-50 in explosive move. Then a heavy set of 5 in the abs.

    The key here is to understnad that heavier weights take more rest between sets and more days in between, where lighter weights can be done quicker and more often. Eat and sleep well.

    Good luck.
    jmo
    PL54 RKC

  6. #6
    JasonL.Ac. is offline Senior Member
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    Default

    What Jack said above, and Steve. Also, do you feel like you've plateaued yet with pttp? If so, have you tried the different cycling approaches in there, or are you just going straight linear for a series of workouts then starting over? If its still working for you (and some people have taken it really, really far; Phil Workman comes to mind), than why stop?

    As far as pttp Pro goes, I have it, and while its fascinating to read, for me as an advanced beginner/low intermediate deadlifter (a little over 2.5bw), I find it to be way over my head. Pavel's preface to it is entitled "burn before reading" (think about it). I agree with Jack, ES is probably the way to for you.

  7. #7
    CoachDarren is offline Junior Member
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Spikeman1444 View Post
    I know nothing of PTTP but I will bump you so hopefully someone who does will reply.
    Thanks Spikeman! I appreciate the bump! Thanks man!

  8. #8
    CoachDarren is offline Junior Member
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve W. View Post
    One reason you probably didn't get replies is that your question is very vague. What do you mean by intermediate? What are your goals? What other kinds of training, sports or physically demanding work are you doing? What kinds of cycles have you done previously? Have you hit a plateau and stopped making progress? Do you have a specific weakness that is holding you back? Etc.

    As for PTTP Pro, it doesn't really build off of the original template, nor is it really a program. It is a book of articles discussing many different advanced approaches, programs and techniques for the powerlifts and the overhead press.

    It's very interesting, and a lot of the technique discussion would probably benefit anyone who does these lifts. But most of the programming is not necessarily directly applicable except for more advanced competitive lifters. And it's definitely a "more than one way to skin a cat" type of book, rather than the "do this" type like the original PTTP. If you already suffer from information overload, this book won't help.
    Steve,

    Thanks for the info. Sounds like PTTP Pro is too advanced for me. I mentioned being an intermeadiate lifter because I'm not a rookie, but I'm also not advanced. I have heard that PTP works great for beginners, but not as well for advanced guys and intermeadiates. I haven't seen too many people that use PTP indefinitely, but maybe there are some that have used it for years successfully.

    My goals are too get stronger, that's about it. I also want a quick workout, hence my attraction to PTP.

    I'm tired of doing long sessions, I want to do 2-3 lifts and be done quickly. I was hoping I could do PTP for at least a year or so, probably alternating movements every cycle. ie-1 cycle= DL, Floor Press. 2nd cycle=Squat, Chins. Something like this. Not sure if this would make sense or not.

  9. #9
    CoachDarren is offline Junior Member
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by powerlifter54 View Post
    Coach D,

    Yes you can.

    Take a look at the Easy Stength template. 2-3X a week, 2 lifts pushing 80-95%weights, 10 reps total per drill in sets of 2-5 reps, approximately 5 minute rest periods.

    Then look at Even Easier Strength, up to 5X a week, 2 lifts pushing 40-80% weights, 10 reps total but can do them all in one set, short rest periods.

    THEN LOOK AT THE 40 DAY PLAN. 5 exercises. The deadlift, an upper body press, and upper body pull hint:chins or pullups, a full body explosive movement with KB, and a heavy ab movement. 5-7 days a week at your choice. Warmup with Goblet or overhead squats. Go as heavy or as light as you feel each day. 2 sets of 5 in DL, push and pull, and 1 set of 20-50 in explosive move. Then a heavy set of 5 in the abs.

    The key here is to understnad that heavier weights take more rest between sets and more days in between, where lighter weights can be done quicker and more often. Eat and sleep well.

    Good luck.
    Thanks for the info PL54. Do you think I could still be successful using standard PTP?

  10. #10
    CoachDarren is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JasonL.Ac. View Post
    What Jack said above, and Steve. Also, do you feel like you've plateaued yet with pttp? If so, have you tried the different cycling approaches in there, or are you just going straight linear for a series of workouts then starting over? If its still working for you (and some people have taken it really, really far; Phil Workman comes to mind), than why stop?

    As far as pttp Pro goes, I have it, and while its fascinating to read, for me as an advanced beginner/low intermediate deadlifter (a little over 2.5bw), I find it to be way over my head. Pavel's preface to it is entitled "burn before reading" (think about it). I agree with Jack, ES is probably the way to for you.
    JasonL,

    Thanks for replying to my post. I used PTP a long time ago. I would use different cycling approaches and eventually I went stale. Maybe there were some ways to keep things going that I wasn't aware of.

    I want to give PTP another run, but I wasn't sure what changes I need to make to keep things going for someone that is not a beginner.

    For example, when one goes stale. What changes should one make at this point? Maybe I should have tried more extreme versions of the cycling. For step cycling, I could stay with the same weight for 3 -4 sessions before moving on or something similar. I will try to find info about Phil Workman, sounds interesting.

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