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  1. #1
    SolidGK is offline Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
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    Default Running 10 miles in an hour?

    Hi all

    I'm a 26yo male, 6'2, 95kg and have set a goal for myself to run 10 miles in an hour. I ran cross country in high school and have always been very active, but never very fast! I have much more of a sprinter physique and could definitely stand to lose a few kgs. (I am currently in the process of cutting down to 85kg, which should help with my goal).

    I can currently run for probably 30-45m but haven't done so in a while (not counting my weekly 9 a side matches). My last timed run was a 1.5 mile run 2 years ago that I completed in just over 10 minutes. I have never really trained in running, however.

    How should I approach this goal? Build up speed first, then add distance? Distance first, then speed? I am giving myself 6 - 12 months to accomplish this goal, as I know it will take a while.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Tringelt is offline Junior Member
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    Jul 2011
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    The Czech Republic
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    Default

    What helped me with running...

    1. Mind the technique /pose running, barefoot
    2. Find comfortable, intensive and recovery pace. Track the progress and measure time - always.
    3. CF endurance - running... great programming

  3. #3
    green is offline Member
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    Finland
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    Default

    1. Don't you think you're asking this on a wrong forum? (There are running forums around)
    2. You have to build good base slowly, otherwise you risk injuring yourself. So first LSD. Then speed.
    3. If you are now able to run for 45 minutes, and haven't run for years, I don't think you can do it in 12 months. I might be wrong though, can you give some of your results from high school? And when was this? 10 years ago?
    4. You are bit on the heavy side for a distance runner. Losing weight would dramatically increase your running performance. Are you comfortable with this? You would need a huge heart to move that kind of weight.

    I consider myself a runner. I just ran 10k in under 42 minutes. If I wanted to train for 10M/1h, it would propably take me ~2 years.

    If you're serious, go ask this question on a running forum. Or, better yet, get yourself a coach.

  4. #4
    DLS
    DLS is offline Senior Member
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    Feb 2012
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    Pacific Northwest
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    Default

    Where are you located? Your post mixes metric with English measures so I'm guessing you are not in the United States?

    If you are in the U.S., virtually every community has a track & field or running club that is open to individuals. I would search these out. You can get coaching, comradeship, training partners etc. very easily by joining these venues. I wouldn't know if these exist outside of the U.S. but would be surprised if they did not!

    To echo what is already posted, distance running is not the domain of this board. There are many sites dedicated to what you are attempting to accomplish, you would be better served by searching for those.

    Distance running is a very different animal from the mid-length and shorter events and need to be trained differently than the shorter events. It's virtually all aerobic, utilizing to a minuscule extent the creatinine / phosphate and glycolic energy pathways.

    I could point you to ample information for 3K and shorter (my boy runs the 1600 and throws in T&F) so if that seems to be of value to you send me a PM and I'll forward some links. But in all reality, you should focus on the distance event from the very beginning and train toward that end.
    Be well ... Lee.

  5. #5
    pesce is offline Senior Member
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    Dec 2008
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    Seattle, WA
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    Default

    My $0.02

    1. Distance first, then speed.
    2. +1 to taking your time, what's the rush?
    3. +1 to getting your form dialed. If you get hurt you don't get to train.

    I think a good goal, and you are young enough to do take it on...good luck with it.

  6. #6
    green is offline Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
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    Finland
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    Default

    One thing more.
    Do a test run, 10k or 5k for example, then enter your time here: http://www.mcmillanrunning.com/calculator
    You get optimal training paces for your runs. Repeat the test run every two months or so.

    If you are going to learn new running technique (pose, barefoot, whatever), add 12 months to your goal.

    Sent from my HTC One X using Tapatalk 2

  7. #7
    Wooden Leg is offline Senior Member
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    Jan 2011
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    Default

    Those running calculators are generally very accurate, at least below half marathon distance. If you look at equivalents, you can see it's a stiff target - you'll need a sub 5 minute mile, and a sub 36minute 10k, for example, to be in shape.

    As the others have said, build your base mileage first. Given the nature of the target, that base will probably have to be quite high, so it's going to be a big training commitment. Maybe 40 mpw. Just doing lots of easy running will get you faster before you add any pace (if you want to go into the specifics of why this is, read this very detailed article: http://www.angio.net/personal/run/hadd.pdf . You can think of it as a bit like Easy Strength - instead of coaxing up your max lifts by working lighter weights frequently, you are coaxing up your race pace with high volume at your easier paces.)

    There are other approaches - lower volume, higher 'quality' but in my experience they only go so far. YMMV.

  8. #8
    AndrewR is offline Senior Member
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    Jan 2009
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    Melbourne, Australia
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    Default

    It's probably easier to build distance first and then speed. But you do run the risk of getting good at running slowly for long periods of time.

    Alternatively you can learn to run at your target pace for short periods/ intervals and slowly build distance.

    Both will work.

    At 6'2" 95kg you're quite big and losing at least 10kg will help. 15kg would be better. For reference I'm the same height and currently weigh 84kg and for fast running would shed another 3-4kg. You can see what I'm up to here - http://breakingmuscle.com/endurance-...taving-boredom as well as the maths of how much force the body has to deal with at various weights. Dropping 10kg of weight makes a 200,000kg difference in how much force you take over 6km (double that for your 10mi).

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