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  1. #1
    CharlieJay is offline Member
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    Default "Loose" pressing?

    Do any of you guys do the really loose grip presses? I'm talking about the ones where you don't really choke the handle and the press is extremely fast. People will generally stay loose throughout the body when doing them too. Also, the groove is more of a straight line. I've heard people say that it's more of a "practical" or "efficient" style of press. Any ideas?

    I've also been interested in Kenneth Jay's book about pressing. For those of you who have read it, are all these styles of pressing covered in it? or just RKC style press variations?

  2. #2
    gtrgy888 is offline Senior Member
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    It depends on the weight you're pressing. For one arm pressing half bodyweight, staying loose would be a bad idea.

    For high rep sets with submaximal weights it might be a better idea.
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  3. #3
    Steve Freides is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by CharlieJay View Post
    Do any of you guys do the really loose grip presses? I'm talking about the ones where you don't really choke the handle and the press is extremely fast. People will generally stay loose throughout the body when doing them too. Also, the groove is more of a straight line. I've heard people say that it's more of a "practical" or "efficient" style of press. Any ideas?
    People say a lot of things. The Girevoy Sport folks take a very different approach to the press than we do here - perhaps that's what you're talking about.

    Quote Originally Posted by CharlieJay View Post
    I've also been interested in Kenneth Jay's book about pressing. For those of you who have read it, are all these styles of pressing covered in it? or just RKC style press variations?
    It's an excellent book - get it! But it focuses on the Hard, RKC style, so if you're looking for alternatives to that, KJ's book isn't where you'll find them.

    What are you trying to accomplish for yourself in your pressing? That's the first order of business to address.
    -S-

  4. #4
    CharlieJay is offline Member
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    What am I trying to do? I would like to get the most natural press I possibly can. I don't really care about shoulder hypertrophy and stuff. Ideally, I would practice the strongest, most ergonomic groove. I'm more concerned with strength and health!

  5. #5
    Steve Freides is offline Senior Member
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    If you wish to become stronger in the press, follow the advice in Enter The Kettlebell and Perfecting The Press. Both books will teach you how to execute a strong press, and your questions themselves will be different after you've read either and followed its training advice.

    Best wishes for success in your pressing program.
    -S-

  6. #6
    bwwm is offline Senior Member
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    Here's the thing - if you try to press 'loose', it can be done, but might not get you the performance you're looking for. As mentioned in the aforementioned books, you can't shoot a cannon from a canoe. So if you don't have your legs zipped up, your abs tensed, your glutes and hips locked, and your lat engaged, it's going to be harder to initiate the press and keep the bell moving.

    To give you an example, on Saturday I was pressing my 98# bell. I've been hitting the deadlifts heavy and grinding them out in the last week of a mini-cycle. Because my right hip was a bit sore and not fully engaging, my left arm stalled on a set of 3 at the end of my Russian Ladder. I took some time to 'shake out' the hip, re-hydrate a bit, and 5 min later, I knocked out the 3 reps no problem. All it takes is one link in the chain to be slack, and the bell can stall. That's why in Perfecting the Press, Kenneth has a number of assistance movements that help one address a myriad of possible weak parts in the press.

  7. #7
    forth is offline Senior Member
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    I remember KJ got a question about the pressing in Perfecting the Press and he lamented the fact that he didn't get around to covering how high tension was not quite the ideal.

    When I was rocking the high volume sessions of his specialisation program I did them as loose as possible for sure.

  8. #8
    aussieluke is offline Senior Member
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    Default

    I wonder if the OP may be referring to that article KJ put out a little while ago (which I can't seem to find right now) about common mistakes in KB training, one of them being overuse of tension, and bracing the abs too much, and that your body naturally knows how much tension is required.

    I believe the article got a lot of stick on here for various reasons and I don't want to send this thread down the wrong path.

  9. #9
    CharlieJay is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by aussieluke View Post
    I wonder if the OP may be referring to that article KJ put out a little while ago (which I can't seem to find right now) about common mistakes in KB training, one of them being overuse of tension, and bracing the abs too much, and that your body naturally knows how much tension is required.

    I believe the article got a lot of stick on here for various reasons and I don't want to send this thread down the wrong path.
    Ehh, it's all good. That's what I was trying to do: bring up something that would get people talking. It would be silly to think that there is only one way to do things. I like to hear complete opposite opinions sometimes.

  10. #10
    Com. Stefan is offline Senior Member
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    Mike Mahler has also talked about staying relaxed in the rack position and then explosively pressing. He's also pressing more in a straight line than what's shown in Enter the Kettlebell. Maybe that's what you're talking about comrade CharlieJay?

    I do something similar to that on speed days, typically very low reps but plenty of sets.

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