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  1. #1
    Chris Hansen is offline Senior Member
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    Default TGU: How much and how often until diminishing returns?

    The tgu seems to be really good for my shoulder so I want to work on it as much as is useful. Is there a certain point of optimal benefit from the exercise in terms of volume and frequency?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Josef is offline Senior Member
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    There's absolutely no way anyone can answer this without it being completely arbitrary.
    [COLOR=black][I]Are you a man, a dog, or a monster?[/I][/COLOR]

  3. #3
    bwwm is offline Senior Member
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    You could start with the program minimum and decided from there to increase or decrease the volume/frequency based on your goals/needs, etc.

  4. #4
    Brooklyn86 is offline Member
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    I apologize in advance if I come off like a smart ass, but that's like asking how long your going to walk for. As long as possible.
    AJ Oliva RKC, FMS

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  5. #5
    BJones RKC is offline Senior Member
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    a better way to approach this question

    How are you using the Get-up now?
    Weight
    Reps
    sets
    frequency
    etc...

    What is your total training volume?
    Frequency, intensity, volume etc...

    Are you coming back from injury etc...?

  6. #6
    Chris Hansen is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by BJones RKC View Post
    a better way to approach this question

    How are you using the Get-up now?
    Mostly practice. Specifically, shoulder positioning on the support arm and strengthening the muscles involved. And keeping the upper trap from trying to do the work.

    I've been alternating right and left sides with the 16k until I get tired a couple times per week.

  7. #7
    BJones RKC is offline Senior Member
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    Chris,
    Too vague
    How many reps = "I get tired"?

    For now all I can recommend is that you continue your practice and work towards being able to do 5 full reps right and left as a single set but without the other information that is all I can do.

  8. #8
    ad5ly is offline Senior Member
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    A TGU from start to finish is about 30-45 seconds - 1 rep. So 5 reps left and right with a few moments for rest gets you to about 12 minutes or more. Not bad for one drill. A full body movement with many complex movements within it which require and demand complete attention and mental concentration to make it "perfect". For me I am done when I lose that focus. 5-8 reps for me is about it. If you can do 20 then thats where you are. But 5 is fine. Quality over quantity rules. And that is all (5 -8 reps) i feel i need. Other factors is if the TGU goal is for strength (heavy) or improved mobility and body awareness (light)..Dennis

  9. #9
    Steve Freides is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Hansen View Post
    The tgu seems to be really good for my shoulder so I want to work on it as much as is useful. Is there a certain point of optimal benefit from the exercise in terms of volume and frequency.
    Chris, how you asked your question is worth commenting on.

    If you substitute any other exercise for the getup, you could have asked the same question, e.g., what's the point of optimum benefit in terms of volume and frequency for the barbell back squat? There's simply no one right answer to any question like this because the biggest missing piece of information is your goals - if we don't know what you're trying to accomplish, then we can't get a sense of where the getup might fit into that picture.

    To use myself as an example, I've recently started competing as a powerlifter again - you'd be amazed what having a meet a few months down the road does for the focus of your training. I've got very specific goals - I want to post a bigger number of each of my three lifts on November 4 than I posted on July 8, all while continuing to at least maintain and hopefully improve on my basic mobility and joint health. I ask you - put into a single sentence what you're trying to accomplish and where you see the getup fitting in and then we can comment on what might work best for you.

    If the getup for you is nothing other than keeping your shoulder healthy, then I'd say keep the weight light to moderate, the frequency moderate to high, but keep varying both those things by finding a cyclice approach, e.g., do bw-only getups or very light ones every day near the beginning of your day or your workout, and a couple of times a year, plug a moderate to heavy weighted getup into your training cycle for a period of one to three months.

    Just my opinion, your mileage may vary.
    -S-

  10. #10
    bigwood177 is offline Member
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    Good question, Chris, and something I've wondered about, too.

    I remember reading a post on the forum some time ago about the length of rest between workouts.
    There was a post to the effect: "I grew up on a farm where I lifted and tossed bails of hay every day and didn't suffer from not resting every other day."
    To which someone replied, "Yeah, you could lift every day, but why would you want to?"

    Which, to me anyway, raises the question, in general is there an optimum amount of exercise?
    If you're doing get-ups, do you get 80% of the benefit after 5 reps and then diminishing returns after that, or do the benefits of lifting continue in a straight line?

    I've often wondered "what's the minimum you can do and get good results?" and "what's the incremental benefit of continuing beyond that point?

    Or, to put it another way, what's the 20% of effort that yields that 80% of the results.

    Or, maybe I've missed the OP's point entirely.

    Wood

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