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  1. #1
    Chris Hansen is offline Senior Member
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    Default Sio many movements, how to choose?

    Hello all,

    For many years I've had shoulder problems that have prevented me from doing most upper body exercises, and also back problems that have prevented me from doing most weighted lower body exercises. I finally found a couple of outstanding people to work with and am now able to start working on all these things I couldn't do before. The problem is that I'm like a kid in a candy shop. I want to do everything but can't possibly do it all at once. As an example: I'd like to include single and double leg squat and deadlift variations, also swings, and some kind of lunge but that's already probably too many things.

    Right now, my main goal is to practice the movements and ingrain them in muscle memory until they become automatic, and to build some work capacity and reach the point where they can be done with confidence. I can't possibly work everything at once though so I'm looking for suggestions to incorporate the most important moves in the most productive manner.

    What movement patterns should be "mastered" first and at what point are you ready to move on to the next step? Is it more productive to focus on one specific movement or to include a couple of "same but different" movements for each category?

    Since "practicing the movement" is the primary goal, it makes sense to me to keep the intensity low and the frequency high but I would value people's input on this.

  2. #2
    Chad Paulus is offline Senior Member
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    Default

    Id recommend starting with Turkish Get ups. Start with no weight and own the movement then add some weight. You could also add kb deadlifts and goblet squats.
    Chad Paulus -- RKC/HKC, FMS, RN

    [CENTER]“You cannot walk towards your Greatness you can only walk away from it.”[/CENTER]
    [CENTER]- [I]Keith Kochner[/I][/CENTER]

  3. #3
    Pat Flynn RKC is offline Senior Member
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    I would not load a pattern until you have mastered it unloaded.

    Push, pull, hinge, squat, carry, and TGU is a great start.
    Pat Flynn - RKC
    [URL]http://www.chroniclesofstrength.com[/URL]
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  4. #4
    Chris Hansen is offline Senior Member
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    Somehow, posting my concerns allowed me to think about it more objectively.

    I think I might follow ETK, the program minimum, almost as written plus a few other things.

    I've started working on step 2 of cc pushups done daily for low/moderate reps, just practicing. Also one arm pushups on the wall. I can reach around with the other hand and monitor the scapula action, it provides a type of feedback so I know when my form starts to wander. I'll probably add some goblet squats and rows to the warmup and I've been GTGing pullups.

    Guess I'll see how that goes, I think it addresses most of what I'm looking for but it's a simple matter to make adjustments if needed.

  5. #5
    Rich in Nor Cal is offline Senior Member
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    Just like Pat said, basic movements with as little resistance as possible. Range of motion/joint mobility type stuff to begin re-adapting the soft tissue. I think it would be important to take your time, go slowly, and consistently. Daily training of light, basic movements, paying close attention to how your body feels, would be the safest route back.

    In my opinion, of course.

  6. #6
    Chris Hansen is offline Senior Member
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    Slow and easy is the name of the game. After months of deadlifting the kb, I'm finally working on swings and, after months of pt I'm starting to do actual pushups. Getups no longer cause pain so I've started working on these. It's exciting to be able to start working on movements that have been denied to me for so long.

    Some things, like pullups, never caused any problems so I just do them.

  7. #7
    md corral is offline Senior Member
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    Hi Chris- I'm very curious.... What was it you needed to move beyond your shoulder problems? Was it a series of exercises or something else?

    I do see you mention below in a later post the example of One arm wall pushups while monitoring the working scapula.

    Thanks.

  8. #8
    Chris Hansen is offline Senior Member
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    It was a problem with the middle/lower traps the lats and maybe even some serratus forgetting how to act as shoulder stabilizers. Once those started coming back online and the upper traps learned to relax a bit things really started improving.

  9. #9
    md corral is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Hansen View Post
    It was a problem with the middle/lower traps the lats and maybe even some serratus forgetting how to act as shoulder stabilizers. Once those started coming back online and the upper traps learned to relax a bit things really started improving.
    Interesting... How did you bring those muscles back into play?

  10. #10
    Chris Hansen is offline Senior Member
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    I found an uncommonly smart pt/fms guy by the name of Andy Masis here in Minnesota. I'd recommend him to anyone. After looking at me, he was able to prescribe specific rehab-type exercises. Then it was a simple matter of daily practice and keeping my appointments so he could check my progress and make adjustments.

    I also found that attention to detail is critical. It's easy to do what looks like the right movement but without using all the correct muscles.
    Last edited by Chris Hansen; 11-21-2012 at 05:22 AM.

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