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  1. #1
    map3 is offline Junior Member
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    May 2012
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    Default Squat Like a Baby


  2. #2
    DTris is offline Senior Member
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    Dayton, OH
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    Default

    I read most of the article. All I can say is that I used to not be able to do a deep squat. Now I can. Deep squats are part of my mobility routine and they have been very beneficial for improving discomfort and pain in my hips. The biggest impediment I had to a deep squat was a big belly. Now that the belly is much smaller I can deep squat much more easily and comfortably. I really see no reason why an adult should not be able to deep squat unless they are overweight or have an injury that prevents it. From my experience deep squats are awesome, with or without weight.

  3. #3
    postandspread is offline Senior Member
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    Tumminello was doing great in the article until he wrote: "When we say that the deep squat influences the movements you do in your sport, we are ALSO SAYING that the movements you do in your sport influence your deep squat." Then he compounds this by quoting Ayn Rand on logic(!): "Whenever you think you are facing a contradiction, check your premises. You will find one of them is wrong."

    He should understand the difference between forward and reverse implications (a.k.a. necessary and sufficient conditions) in the first quote and that contradictions may arise from faulty inferential procedures (which can include not understanding the difference between forward and reverse implications) rather than from faulty premises, in the second quote. This isn't a minor quibble because his entire article is an attempt to debunk conclusions derived by flawed logic. He ought to have kept his own nose clean.

    Nevertheless, the main points he makes seem to be very persuasive.

  4. #4
    DTris is offline Senior Member
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    His only real persuasive points are those based on the difference between a baby's physiology and an adults. Which while I had heard of the squat like a baby thing before I never took it to mean anything other than a good deep squat. A baby can do a good deep squat, an adult can do a good deep squat. They are not going to be identical because of physiological differences but they will share important characteristics. Seems like his whole article is based on a strawman to me.

  5. #5
    postandspread is offline Senior Member
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    IMO, what Tumminello was getting at is a tendency to regard infancy and/or childhood as a paradigm for movement for all age groups. I think he does a plausible job of it.

    In http://www.dragondoor.com/articles/t...ment-patterns/ Gray Cook writes: "Consideration of primitive patterns can help make you a more intuitive, and intelligent exercise professional. Very often we become experts in exercise without considering growth and development, which is where the fundamentals of movement were first established. Children develop naturally and symmetrically with adequate stability and no limitations in mobility." I seem to remember him in one of his videos saying something similar about the observing the way babies move or squat. Don't have the correct reference now but seemed to have the general tenor of go to the ant, thou sluggard, and consider her ways.

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