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  1. #1
    greenlanterncorp1987 is offline Senior Member
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    Default Why is training to failure a bad idea?

    Just what it asks. Thanks

  2. #2
    Wolfeye is offline Banned
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    One thing is that the body gets in the habit of stopping when things get intense. It goes: harder, harder, stop; harder, harder, stop- then when you're doing something, it gives out in the middle of it. I think there are other reasons, but I'm not exactly sure what they are.

  3. #3
    porvida is offline Member
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    I thought I read that it had something to do with fatiguing the CNS which leads to sickness and/injury.

  4. #4
    ad5ly is offline Senior Member
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    I have TTF and it never worked for me - in the long run. Some programs have you doing TTF and for awhile - maybe 6 months -you do improve. But you will crash and burn eventually. Your CNS just gives up and does'nt want to play anymore. Pschologically a TTF routine trains your brain to accept failure. Failing is normalized. Learning to fail becomes easier and easier. Would it be better to train your brain to accept nothing but victory and accomplishment? By definition TTF also trains you to crank out sloppy reps. I have read that for every sloppy rep you perform, you must make up that lost ground with at least 10 high quality reps. Say you did 10 pullups. The 8th, 9th and 10th reps were done sloppy - and you "failed" on the 11th rep. You just negated all the good that the first 7 reps had done for you. And you now have to make all that up in the future. ..Dennis

  5. #5
    fatman is offline Senior Member
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    It isn't a bad idea in general, it's just unproductive when training for maximal strength. You can gain muscle nicely with a few 'pumping' sets done to failure.
    [URL="http://heavyasareallyheavything.blogspot.com"]Fatman's Training Log[/URL]

  6. #6
    saintm is offline Senior Member
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    If you did it every workout, you'd stop making progress and you'd burn yourself out.

    I KIND OF go to failure: I'm going for 3-6 sets of 5 with an exercise, 1 minute breaks. When I can't get 5, I stop the exercise. Sometimes I fail at mid rep attempt, sometimes I'll make a final grinding rep and simply know I'm not making the next one- and then stop. I never do the forced-rep stuff, though. Three workouts will be done like this, and the 4rth one is a complete back-off practice session. I'm making progress with this.

    Even though I'm technically not doing 5/3/1, I sort of got this idea very indirectly from Jim Wendler and Pavel's writings. Keeping that mind of mine as open as I can.....

    So, going to failure at least at some point is not the Boogy-man. Basically, you need to know where you stand at some point in time.

  7. #7
    mrdave100 is offline Senior Member
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    When I started BW training 10 years ago, I went through a period when I trained to failure. After about 2 weeks it got to where I just couldn't face another grueling set and stopped all together for a while. I agree with Fatman, I think training to failure does have it place, but I'd rather train by coaxing my muscles into growth (Paul Wade) rather than beating them into submission.

  8. #8
    ad5ly is offline Senior Member
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    Tolerances for TTF vary with everyone. I very quickly reach a point with TTF that at first my body is very sore. But worse is when progress flatlines and even worse than that is when I get weaker in my lifts and all my lifting sucks bad. My psche is also begging to call it quits. BUT even worse than that is when I sustain an injury which keeps me from further training, and at my age a 3 month period layoff due to injury is a "big f#&king deal" ( a Joe Biden quote)..hehe!!.. If TTF works for you then have at it..Dennis

  9. #9
    DTris is offline Senior Member
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    Well to quote Pavel, "Strength is a skill." There is a saying in sports training that I first heard form my golf coach when I was a teenager. "Practice does not make perfect, perfect practice makes perfect." So whether we are training to play golf, perform an instrument, martial arts, or any other skill, we are best served if we do so by making each attempt at practice as perfect as possible. If I am too tired to have good form, then the practice does not help me improve.

    When you train to failure you become too tired to do each rep with good form. Then you start to cheat and use bad form. This is counterproductive. However if you stop at the first sign of your fatigue overcoming your technique, then we could also say you trained to failure in another sense. Just not the one typically meant by the phrase.

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