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  1. #11
    AWAQ is offline Junior Member
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    Jul 2010
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    15

    Default It's probably your hips

    * When standing relaxed, do both your knees point straight ahead?
    * Do your knees and feet point in the same direction?
    * If you do 1 leg deep knee bend, can you keep your foot pointing straight ahead. Are your hips level?

    Most simply put, the knee is a hinge joint and is not made for twisting which can happen if your hips are off. I would check this out first.

  2. #12
    terich is offline Junior Member
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    Default

    Do you know this clever little book "Treat your own knees"? Look on Amazon, it may give you some answers, good luck.

  3. #13
    schnieder is offline Senior Member
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    St. Paul
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    Default

    Bradley - email me sean@strengthproductionsllc.com

    I have some simple stuff to try. It might work and it might not.
    Sean Schniederjan RKC

    Can you open your thoracic spine while you brush your teeth? Free ebook "Cure Tight Shoulders Anywhere" here:

    www.yourstrengthsource.com

    Tight Hips? Cure Tight Hips Anywhere

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00M4WJGOS

  4. #14
    ChrisSpring is offline Junior Member
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    May 2012
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fatman View Post
    Are you injured, or have an inborn defect?

    How do you feel that your legs are not working properly? A PT who 'understood' that "pain is not the problem" would not really be a PT, but a quack.
    Then call me a quack!

    You want to know what a bad PT does? They chase the pain. You got knee pain, they'd examine the knee, treat the knee, and strengthen structures around the knee. But 99% percent of the time, the knee is not the problem with non-traumatic injuries! There's a dysfunction elsewhere (usually immobility of the hip and/or ankle) that causes excess stress on the knee. Does having a stiff hip mean you'll have knee pain? Of course not, but it doesn't mean that a stiff hip isn't going to make you move dysfunctional elsewhere.

    Different people and cultures describe pain and problems differently - and that is why PTs use objective and functional exams. The FMS is a functional screen that DD was associated with, which looks at movement patterns for individuals without pain. There's a sister screen for us medical professionals called the SFMA which looks at movement patterns with people with pain. Even though he sometimes does not have pain and pain is not an issue, he still has a significant history of pain and he would be a great candidate for this screen. The screen looks at and breaks down full body movement patterns and divides them into functional/dysfunctional and painful/non-painful. And the real genius of it is according to the assessment you treat/correct the most dysfunctional NON-PAINFUL pattern first - and then the painful area magically sees improvement.

    90 out of 100 of people who get injured do not know what's wrong with them, and of the 10 who think they do know, 9 of them are wrong. There's nothing wrong with someone not knowing how to describe what's wrong with them, that's my job to figure it out.

  5. #15
    SScullin is offline Member
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    Mar 2010
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    Read Performance Training - 431 Warrigal Road, Moorabbin (Melbourne) VIC 3189
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    Default

    Hi Bradley,

    May I ask, where are you located? And have you tried seeing an FMS (Functional Movement Screen) certified trainer? The FMS trainer will be able to screen you and give you corrective exercises that may help to alleviate your problem...

    I train a client who has had constant knee pain for almost 5 years. She recently went in for an arthroscopy on both knees and was looking at more serious surgery further down the track. After running her through an FMS screen and performing specific corrective exercises the pain in her knees has started to alleviate and on her last visit to her specialist was advised "whatever it is you are doing, keep doing it"!

    I am not saying that you have the same ailment as her but I highly recommend getting a screen. You can find a list of certified specialists closest to you in the following link:

    www.functionalmovement.com

    I hope this helps. Let me know how you progress.
    RKC Team Leader, CK-FMS, PCC & Primal Move Fundamentals Instructor.

    PT Manager
    Read Performance Training
    http://www.readpt.com

    Dragon Door Australia
    http://www.dragondooraustralia.com
    http://www.dragondooraustralia.wordpress.com

  6. #16
    SScullin is offline Member
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    Mar 2010
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    Read Performance Training - 431 Warrigal Road, Moorabbin (Melbourne) VIC 3189
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    Default

    Oh... I forgot to mention..... If your knees are bad, stay away from the leg extensions. They will only be making the problem worse!
    RKC Team Leader, CK-FMS, PCC & Primal Move Fundamentals Instructor.

    PT Manager
    Read Performance Training
    http://www.readpt.com

    Dragon Door Australia
    http://www.dragondooraustralia.com
    http://www.dragondooraustralia.wordpress.com

  7. #17
    GeoffreyLevens is offline Senior Member
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    Sep 2010
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    Default

    Been putting off adding this comment because it isn't in line w/ common thinking and of course, I am a quack of sorts, having been an acupuncturist of 25 years.

    I have had lots of problems w/ left hip, leg, knee, ankle. Sciatica, back "out" badly sprained ankle several times, 2 knee surgeries for cartilage damage. Fortunately the first surgery they stapled it in place rather than removing and the second, a month later, was only to repair massive scar tissue formation. Tons of my own PT for a couple years and it was good as the right knee.

    Bottom line is that working w/ some brilliant quacks, a Pilates specializing PT and a woman who combined 5 Element Acupuncture, Polarity Therapy, Hanna Somatics, Levine's trauma reintegration, and very refined craniosacral work, I/we uncovered a deep neurological-musculo-skeletal pattern that most likely originated prenatally or during birth. That pattern tends to turn off leg/hip external rotation and cause severe pronation issues in my gait. Once we found that, I could work on retraining OUT of that pattern. This involved primarily awareness in movement work and very very subtle realignments in function by working on very specific muscles to overcome neuromuscular amnesia. Now pretty much no issues except very thin knee cartilage from all the previous stress as a "sensitive" low back/sciatic nerve from all the damage done there. I am good to go on any and all movement and training and have been now for years.

    But it was a learning and long training process to groove in new "reflex" patterns so that now my default is proper alignment rather than misalignment.

    Quack quack!!! I totally agree, pain is an issue but NOT the problem!!!!

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