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Thread: Keep getting injured.

  1. #21
    Scotsfan is offline Senior Member
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    The sad truth of the matter is, you may have to give it up. Honestly, have you looked into bodyweight training such as Convict Conditioning?

    The wear & tear of weight training does take its toll...more quickly on some folks over others. Torn quads or biceps, damage to the back or rotator cuff is a given because the human body was simply not designed to take the beating. I know a few will disagree, but, the fact of the matter is weight training has only been around in its present form for around 120 - 130 years at best.

    Akin to the 'processed food' theorum, that is, our bodies don't react well to a foreign product like white sugar which has not been part of our dietary evolution. So too with the current style of weight training...

    After years of trying this & that to address injuries, I finally realized moderate lifts like deadlifts, overhead pressing, etc., were more in tune with the human physique va. "power" moves--heavy squatting, benching, et al--along with BW, fighting the latest injury became a thing of the past.
    Moses Correa likes this.

  2. #22
    Bradley is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scotsfan View Post
    The sad truth of the matter is, you may have to give it up. Honestly, have you looked into bodyweight training such as Convict Conditioning?

    The wear & tear of weight training does take its toll...more quickly on some folks over others. Torn quads or biceps, damage to the back or rotator cuff is a given because the human body was simply not designed to take the beating. I know a few will disagree, but, the fact of the matter is weight training has only been around in its present form for around 120 - 130 years at best.

    Akin to the 'processed food' theorum, that is, our bodies don't react well to a foreign product like white sugar which has not been part of our dietary evolution. So too with the current style of weight training...

    After years of trying this & that to address injuries, I finally realized moderate lifts like deadlifts, overhead pressing, etc., were more in tune with the human physique va. "power" moves--heavy squatting, benching, et al--along with BW, fighting the latest injury became a thing of the past.
    That's nice and all, but a complete layoff of all weightlifting doesn't help me whatsoever. I've had several complete layoffs to no effect.

  3. #23
    Moses Correa is offline Senior Member
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    I am sorry to hear that you feel like that. However if everything isn't working, maybe the problems is something that you may be doing. Also try to pay attention to your habits(Posture how you pick things up etc) outside of training, research shows us that is mostly where we get hurt. Also how long are you sticking to your programs?

  4. #24
    Bradley is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moses Correa View Post
    I am sorry to hear that you feel like that. However if everything isn't working, maybe the problems is something that you may be doing. Also try to pay attention to your habits(Posture how you pick things up etc) outside of training, research shows us that is mostly where we get hurt. Also how long are you sticking to your programs?
    I stick with programs until PT's give up or kick me out.

  5. #25
    Bradley is offline Senior Member
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    On the positive side, it looks like I can do TBDL's without too much trouble. Only did it once, and didn't feel great, but didn't feel anywhere as uncomfortable as squatting. Or as hard to maintain an arch as when deadlifting.

  6. #26
    Scotsfan is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bradley View Post
    That's nice and all, but a complete layoff of all weightlifting doesn't help me whatsoever. I've had several complete layoffs to no effect.
    Not what I said.

    I suggested finding an approach that will support training for the long term. BW may be an option, or, a combination bodyweight + weights.

    Complete layoffs with no healing may have another message, that is, the injury is more chronic and over the long haul, you're going to have to live with it. It is akin to friends who are runners...layoffs don't seem to be the answer for recovery and the issues continue to recur.

    IMHO, and I'm sure most Chiros or MDs would agree, a damaged joint is just that. Some techniques my assist with soft tissue recovery, but, if any joint suffers from repetitive damage, in all probability, you're going to have to find new way to work out to avoid making things worse. I quit heavy bench pressing for this reason...shoulders started acting up once I was over "X" number of plates and decided there was no point. Bench pressing wasn't feeding my family and no reason not to find other options more shoulder friendly like TGUs, pushups, etc.
    Last edited by Scotsfan; 10-22-2013 at 03:35 PM.

  7. #27
    Bradley is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scotsfan View Post
    Not what I said.

    I suggested finding an approach that will support training for the long term. BW may be an option, or, a combination bodyweight + weights.

    Complete layoffs with no healing may have another message, that is, the injury is more chronic and over the long haul, you're going to have to live with it. It is akin to friends who are runners...layoffs don't seem to be the answer for recovery and the issues continue to recur.

    IMHO, and I'm sure most Chiros or MDs would agree, a damaged joint is just that. Some techniques my assist with soft tissue recovery, but, if any joint suffers from repetitive damage, in all probability, you're going to have to find new way to work out to avoid making things worse. I quit heavy bench pressing for this reason...shoulders started acting up once I was over "X" number of plates and decided there was no point. Bench pressing wasn't feeding my family and no reason not to find other options more shoulder friendly like TGUs, pushups, etc.
    You're still missing the point. It's not that layoffs followed by resuming activities results inthe same pain from those activities. It's that throughout the layoff all of the discomfort remains unchanged whatsoever.

  8. #28
    Scotsfan is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bradley View Post
    You're still missing the point. It's not that layoffs followed by resuming activities results inthe same pain from those activities. It's that throughout the layoff all of the discomfort remains unchanged whatsoever.
    Ah sorry, did misunderstand the pain continuing thru the layoff. I'd think a visit to a qualified MD would be called for as it sounds like you've gone the past of no return with regards to the injury. I had a similar issue with benches and my shoulder and finally gave in. Fortunately the damage was not so bad surgery was required, but, enough so that I found other exercises.

  9. #29
    ya_bolek is offline Member
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    Having gone through a crapload of injuries myself (and still going) I think I can deeply empathize with you. It really s..s. And it s..s even worse when noone can help you, even highly qualified professionals.
    I can only share what remedy has been the most effective specifically to my own injuries, something that nobody actually recommended to me, at least not nearly to the extent and the focus I've had to apply. It's been vigorous massaging of the tendons, not just the spots where it hurts but also searching for other areas that might not be hurting at that time but turn out to be tight as hell and hurting just the same when I start massaging them.
    Now I realize massage this is probably not applicable to a tendon tear. Just trying to show some empathy and give you some encouragement since it has really s..d for me too.
    Thomas

  10. #30
    Bradley is offline Senior Member
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    Could it be a meniscus issue?

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