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Thread: Isometric Lower Body Exercises

  1. #21
    Chris Hansen is offline Senior Member
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    Have you been looked at by a doctor or some kind of health professional?

    I've had wierd things that have worked themselves out after time. I just had to ease into it and be patient. You probably should get looked at by a medical professional and make sure they don't find anything alarming.

  2. #22
    ya_bolek is offline Member
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    More along the line of Qi Gong and other martial arts - the Ving Tsung stance might be a good fit. The idea is to build a stance that maximizes the structural stability during the fight. It turns out that as a side effect this also happens to be a very healthy stance, some folks have reported their lower body and back injuries fixed. Sink in, push the hips out, tuck the tailbone, pigeon-toed, bring knees together, head straight, shoulders down and back. I would not try this by myself though, let alone by my amateur description.
    Thomas

  3. #23
    Bradley is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Hansen View Post
    Have you been looked at by a doctor or some kind of health professional?

    I've had wierd things that have worked themselves out after time. I just had to ease into it and be patient. You probably should get looked at by a medical professional and make sure they don't find anything alarming.
    Only a dozen or more times in the past 8 years, to no avail.

  4. #24
    GeoffreyLevens is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by ya_bolek View Post
    More along the line of Qi Gong and other martial arts - the Ving Tsung stance might be a good fit. The idea is to build a stance that maximizes the structural stability during the fight. It turns out that as a side effect this also happens to be a very healthy stance, some folks have reported their lower body and back injuries fixed. Sink in, push the hips out, tuck the tailbone, pigeon-toed, bring knees together, head straight, shoulders down and back. I would not try this by myself though, let alone by my amateur description.
    Thomas
    Just found this http://www.vtkf.nl/assets/files/26/T...sis_Stance.pdf I learned that from my Kung Fu/Qi Gong teacher years ago. Lot of info about the stance on the link

  5. #25
    Chris Hansen is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bradley View Post
    Only a dozen or more times in the past 8 years, to no avail.
    If the doctors didn't find anything, maybe you just need to take it slow? Try your wall squat but only hold for a few seconds and see how it goes. Maybe don't hold as low at first but find a level you can do with minimal discomfort and see if it improves over time.

    Not that I know your condition but this approach has worked for me before.

  6. #26
    schnieder is offline Senior Member
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    One of my favorite isometric leg routines is

    -Walking on tip toes (calves)
    -Toe pulls (with the opposite foot or KB if available to strengthen tibia)
    -Sinking into each three of the rooting points of the foot and feeling the respective hip muscles fire, i.e. sinking into heels feeling glutes stabilizing, sinking into point below pinkie toe and feeling outer hip firing and playing with these (related to the first two)
    -Kicking heel against opposite toe for isometric hamstring activation and quad relaxation
    -Extending knee and activating quads hard and relaxing hamstrings
    -Flexing hip against resistance (like a KB toe pull or against the resistance of hands against knees, also relaxes glutes
    -Standing Hip Extension to contract glutes and relax hip flexors, psoas

    Then do squats
    Last edited by schnieder; 12-11-2013 at 08:05 AM.
    Sean Schniederjan RKC

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  7. #27
    Ace83 is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Hansen View Post
    Lazy glutes basically.

    Pain in the SI joint and the lower back muscles on that side caused by the glutes getting lazy and the low back taking over the work. Glute activation and strengthening helped.

    The current challenge is to dissociate the back muscles from the hips. The low back is still trying to do the glute's job. I've found it's quite easy to over-involve the low back in, what should be, glute dominant movements.
    Chris, that's interesting. I was just reading an article about the propensity of the low back and hamstrings to work in concert to take over the glutes job. I'm glad your having success in PT!

    (Before hearing about this, I always marvelled at athletes I've met who have large muscular hamstrings, built backs, and small glutes. It's what we see in quadrupedal dominant animals like horses or gorillas, who don't fully extend the hip in extension based movements).


    I would settle for the physique of the little gorilla (before that big one beats the stupid out of him of course)
    Last edited by Ace83; 12-13-2013 at 09:26 PM. Reason: added photo at bottom

  8. #28
    Chris Hansen is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ace83 View Post
    (Before hearing about this, I always marvelled at athletes I've met who have large muscular hamstrings, built backs, and small glutes.
    It's been said that there's no such thing as a glute-dominant athlete. In terms of muscle balance concerns, it seems the glutes can't be too strong.

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