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Thread: Horizontal rows- asking for creativity help!

  1. #1
    porter is offline Junior Member
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    Nov 2008
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    Default Horizontal rows- asking for creativity help!

    Alright folks, bear with me. Asking for some light-hearted assistance:

    I'm back in school full time (read:broke/poor) and living in the Pacific NW (crap weather and rain). Working on pullups on my doorway bar, but would like to keep up with the horizontal rows (step 2).

    I am at a loss for the best way to attempt these here in my apartment. I've measured everything and our couch and chair aren't even close in height. I'm pretty doubtful our matched kitchen chairs would take my weight if I threw a bar across them. I know the kitchen table would end up kindling if even leaned on it.

    Best solution has been a beach towel over the doorway pull up station but even then I'm flexing my neck to avoid the wall at the bottom. No luck finding a cheap walker at a thrift shop yet.

    Anybody have any ideas I'm missing for horizontal rows? Or am I going to the park in a rainsuit?

  2. #2
    porter is offline Junior Member
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    A long time ago a friend showed me you can use the inside corner of a kitchen counter for a dip station. I'm wondering if I'm missing something equally cool/useful for the rows!

  3. #3
    ad5ly is offline Senior Member
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    If you can do regular pullups with the doorway bar, then you should be able to do HPs by elevating your feet such as chairs, books, storage boxes. But without actualy seeing your situation I may not be very helpful. I lived in POULSBO, WA for a few years and you may just have wait for spring or summer if you don't like cold wet weather for the hps...Dennis

  4. #4
    mrdave100 is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by porter
    Best solution has been a beach towel over the doorway pull up station but even then I'm flexing my neck to avoid the wall at the bottom. No luck finding a cheap walker at a thrift shop yet.

    Anybody have any ideas I'm missing for horizontal rows? Or am I going to the park in a rainsuit?

    Is there a different doorway you can use so you avoid the wall?

  5. #5
    Moses Correa is offline Senior Member
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    Can you get a suspension trainer to hang in your doorway?
    That should help you to fix your neck issue and give you the ability to progress the move!

  6. #6
    GeoffreyLevens is online now Senior Member
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    Even a couple of truck load tie down straps, nylon w/ spring cam turn buckle. This kind of thing

    8 ft. x 1-1/4 in. Nylon Cam-Buckle Lashing Straps (2-Pack)-152220 at The Home Depot

    If you have door way bar, can loop over and make loops or add PVC pipe handles instant TRX for cheap. Easy

    If not, tie knots in them near one end and close them into top of door, knot on one side you on the other. Make loops or add PVC pipe handles and adjust length so you are horizontal, just above floor, feet against door with arms fully extended. Not exact dynamic of HP but close-ish

  7. #7
    porter is offline Junior Member
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    Great ideas, thank you! I had always thought about lowering the grip- never occurred to me to raise the feet. And the tie down strap as suspension trainer is new to me as well. Awesome!

    (runs to storage unit to find plastic bins and see if I have tie downs from my old canoe)
    Moses Correa likes this.

  8. #8
    GeoffreyLevens is online now Senior Member
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    Forgot to mention above, if you do the knots held by closed door, far far better for you to be on side of door so it opens away from you. That way, the stress on the knots will pull door tighter. Depending on how sturdy it is, how it is hung, and how much you weigh, the other way set up you could torque the door out just enough for a knot to pop through under load. Don't want that!

  9. #9
    Ace83 is offline Senior Member
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    Default What I do: Doorway, Broomstick, One arm.

    Not recommending this for anyone else, but what I do to keep them in the rotation is put a broomstick across a doorframe, grab the middle with one arm and row. Then I do one arm side rows and one arm side presses (because these feel amazing). As long as the direction of force is still pulling back enough, I can increase the lean to a decent degree. (I would have to set up my ladder in the basement to do normal horizontal rows).

    You could call these 45° rows, mechanically its the same thing. Using one arm increases the difficulty so that its a similar load.
    Last edited by Ace83; 01-08-2014 at 07:53 PM.
    Moses Correa and chixlegs like this.

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