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Thread: Jackknife Squats and Stance

  1. #1
    Mundorfcc is offline Member
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    Default Jackknife Squats and Stance

    I had a question regarding the jackknife squats in CC. Is it okay to physically grip the sides of the chair on the descent? I can't seem to get even close to a full squat doing it the way the diagram is in the book, with palms flat on the bench. This might also be a silly question, but how exactly do you find shoulderwidth apart in terms of feet positioning?

    Many thanks.

  2. #2
    Ace83 is offline Senior Member
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    Default Congratulations on your progress so far!

    Quote Originally Posted by Mundorfcc View Post
    I had a question regarding the jackknife squats in CC. Is it okay to physically grip the sides of the chair on the descent? I can't seem to get even close to a full squat doing it the way the diagram is in the book, with palms flat on the bench.
    Its fine. Honestly, I have found that people that have difficulty squatting in the first place have a hard time with this. I usually have people grip a sturdy doorknob or a rack and practice dropping back and forth into a full squat and working the hips between the legs at the bottom.
    Of course if someone is to weak or severely inflexible to go this option, I keep working the deadlift (I always start with the deadlifts), until they have built up the stability and hip mobility to work on squatting.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mundorfcc View Post
    This might also be a silly question, but how exactly do you find shoulderwidth apart in terms of feet positioning?
    Stand with your side next to a wall, put your foot against the wall, now you know how it feels on that side, switch and you will know how it feels on both sides. Or use a mirror.

    Really though, the deeper question would be what's your best stance personally. You need to be able to get your legs out of your hips way in order to squat deep without rounding your back. But, barring any serious restrictions in mobility, your best bet is to stop thinking about it and jump three times in the air (this is assuming you can safely jump). Now look at your feet, this is your ideal currently (think about posting a video so that the forum members can give you knee saving advice on movement errors you can fix).
    Philip Ross and shapingthecon like this.

  3. #3
    Philip Ross is offline Senior Member
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    Default

    Great advice by Ace83. I have students hold onto a bar to lower themselves. I also practice the Partner Squats, allowing you to lean back thus enabling you to get deeper without rounding your back.

    You also will want to utilize an active negative and employ tension as you "pull" yourself down into the squat.

    Good Luck with your training!
    Ace83 and Moses Correa like this.
    Phil Ross, Master RKC, 8th Degree Black Belt, PCC, CK-FMS, Bodyweight Specialist
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    www.philross.com
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