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Thread: i need a doctor

  1. #1
    Bradley is offline Senior Member
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    Default i need a doctor

    I feel like I'm taking crazy pills. Or this is sone sort of test and I'm being experimented on to see how much frustration a person can take. I can't find a doctor able or willing to hlp within a day's drive. I'm only three hours from NYC, Boston, Buffalo, and Albany is only 30 minutes away. I could even drive as far as Philadelphia.

    Between doctors and PT's I've seen probably 30-40 of them and none of them has helped AT ALL. Most barely listen. Most dismiss my concerns. Most send me away after failing with no suggestion for further treatment. Maybe 5 have been any good, spending adequate time with me, not constantly talking over me, demonstrably a willingness to actually wrack their brains looking for an explanation I've been through PT program after PT program, all working on balance and glute stuff. Doesn't matter. I tell them balance is bad and glutes don't work because alignment is bad, not the other way around. Their "programs" do nothing, and they STILL don't listen. They just shove me out the door with one of their shirts.

    I need someone who will actually listen, consider that I actually have an alignment issue that superficial and minor PT tweaks can never fix, and stick with me until we figure it out and fix it instead of getting rid of patients who aren't fixed by their cookie cutter regimes. Or do such people not exist?

    This is ruining my quality of life, and there is no urgency whatsoever on the part of practioners to fix this before things get so bad they can never be fixed and serious permanent damage is done. It may already be too late. But no one seems all that concerned or helpful.

    Please help.

  2. #2
    Wolfeye is offline Senior Member
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    First off, doctors don't tend to help with much. You might want to try something like a chiropractor or an osteopath. Maybe something in the Traditional Chinese Medicine category? Those tend more toward the idea of fixing what's out-of-whack, instead of trying to attack the body in some way that generates a benefit (a self-negating method).

    What is the problem you're having, anyway? Are your hips screewed-up or your legs disjointed? I just don't get how an alignment issue would occur with that area- it's not like the back that moves in all kinds of directions.

    One other thing: I've heard plenty about posture & such in Systema, but I don't know too much about it (I suggest it because a lot of people have aches & imbalances before they start Systema & it seems to fix them up in a solid way). Rob Poyton has a bunch of DVDs & at least one of them is about general health stuff that's in Systema (this includes posture). You might even try calling him (he's in England) & asking which one might touch on things of musculature & posture.

    A lot of people are reluctant to say something other than "go to a doctor" in this area of the world, I figure because of an overly fawning attitude toward them (which definitely seems to foster egotistical behavior on their part). If you just mention these problems in a lighter way, you might get an answer you can use for something serious. I guess they worry also that their advice is going to cause a "crash & burn" result for you.

    Just to give something off the top of my head: Bridges, kick-backs (you could include the "mule kick" part of burpees in that), kettlebell swings, and back-ups (my word for what tends to be called hyperextensions) all come to mind for the back & glutes. They're also all pretty symmetrical, so you don't have to worry much about imbalances- this will even it out. If one side's stronger than the other, that side won't get stronger by doing what is already easy. The other side will get stronger, though- then you cna increase them together.

  3. #3
    Bradley is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfeye View Post
    First off, doctors don't tend to help with much. You might want to try something like a chiropractor or an osteopath. Maybe something in the Traditional Chinese Medicine category? Those tend more toward the idea of fixing what's out-of-whack, instead of trying to attack the body in some way that generates a benefit (a self-negating method).

    What is the problem you're having, anyway? Are your hips screewed-up or your legs disjointed? I just don't get how an alignment issue would occur with that area- it's not like the back that moves in all kinds of directions.

    One other thing: I've heard plenty about posture & such in Systema, but I don't know too much about it (I suggest it because a lot of people have aches & imbalances before they start Systema & it seems to fix them up in a solid way). Rob Poyton has a bunch of DVDs & at least one of them is about general health stuff that's in Systema (this includes posture). You might even try calling him (he's in England) & asking which one might touch on things of musculature & posture.

    A lot of people are reluctant to say something other than "go to a doctor" in this area of the world, I figure because of an overly fawning attitude toward them (which definitely seems to foster egotistical behavior on their part). If you just mention these problems in a lighter way, you might get an answer you can use for something serious. I guess they worry also that their advice is going to cause a "crash & burn" result for you.

    Just to give something off the top of my head: Bridges, kick-backs (you could include the "mule kick" part of burpees in that), kettlebell swings, and back-ups (my word for what tends to be called hyperextensions) all come to mind for the back & glutes. They're also all pretty symmetrical, so you don't have to worry much about imbalances- this will even it out. If one side's stronger than the other, that side won't get stronger by doing what is already easy. The other side will get stronger, though- then you cna increase them together.
    Every non-doctor I've gone to has given me window-dressing type drills that don't do anything except fill me with frustration due nothing changing. I need an overhaul and these people are giving me tweaks.

    I basically can't do anything in the gym with my lower body without getting injured. I think I'm pretty much limited to leg extensions and ham curls or glute ham raise. Eventually these will probably lead to problems, just like everything else.

    I appreciate the effort, but suggestions for exercises don't do me any good. I'm too frustrated to create my own program with basically a random assortment of exercises. I need a strict program that corresponds to a specific diagnosis. Without that it's a crap shoot. The odds of me happening on the right combination of exercises in the necessary proportion and workload might as well be zero. What exercises to I have to choose from? How many reps, sets? How many times per day? Every day? Maybe there are 4 exercises that together would fix everything, but I'm only guessing what to do, so what if I only do 3 of them due to ignorance? I'm 75% of the way there, but after doing that for a while with no benefit, I'm stuck thinking, well that didn't work. Then what, keep those three exercises and cycle in another? What about when that doesn't work? Keep a different set of 3 of those 4 and cycle in something completely different? And what if I was on a completely wrong track to begin with?

    See what I'm up against? Infinite variation. Unless I have a an accurate and specific diagnoses it's impossible to fix anything.
    Last edited by Bradley; 07-12-2014 at 06:11 PM.

  4. #4
    Bradley is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfeye View Post
    First off, doctors don't tend to help with much. You might want to try something like a chiropractor or an osteopath. Maybe something in the Traditional Chinese Medicine category? Those tend more toward the idea of fixing what's out-of-whack, instead of trying to attack the body in some way that generates a benefit (a self-negating method).

    What is the problem you're having, anyway? Are your hips screewed-up or your legs disjointed? I just don't get how an alignment issue would occur with that area- it's not like the back that moves in all kinds of directions.

    One other thing: I've heard plenty about posture & such in Systema, but I don't know too much about it (I suggest it because a lot of people have aches & imbalances before they start Systema & it seems to fix them up in a solid way). Rob Poyton has a bunch of DVDs & at least one of them is about general health stuff that's in Systema (this includes posture). You might even try calling him (he's in England) & asking which one might touch on things of musculature & posture.

    A lot of people are reluctant to say something other than "go to a doctor" in this area of the world, I figure because of an overly fawning attitude toward them (which definitely seems to foster egotistical behavior on their part). If you just mention these problems in a lighter way, you might get an answer you can use for something serious. I guess they worry also that their advice is going to cause a "crash & burn" result for you.

    Just to give something off the top of my head: Bridges, kick-backs (you could include the "mule kick" part of burpees in that), kettlebell swings, and back-ups (my word for what tends to be called hyperextensions) all come to mind for the back & glutes. They're also all pretty symmetrical, so you don't have to worry much about imbalances- this will even it out. If one side's stronger than the other, that side won't get stronger by doing what is already easy. The other side will get stronger, though- then you cna increase them together.
    Bottom line, I'm convinced it's an alignment problem that can only be fixed through surgery or some other invasive technique, maybe something that applies continual pressure to the bones to change their shape or orientation over months.

    The reason I think this is because every non-doctor has been literally of zero help to me with their muscle activation exercises and such has been literally of zero help to me. Literally a complete waste of thousands of dollars and hours. I have nothing to show for it but a a few t-shirts, a smaller wallet, and brain damage. Literally the only person who has ever provided even 5% relief was a doctor (physiatrist) who did some McConnel taping for me. The tape helped, but just barely perceptibly. But she couldn't provide me with more of the tape and the source she gave me gave me the wrong stuff, and I couldn't replicate the taping she did. Even then, tape is just a band-aid and doesn't get to the root of the problem.

  5. #5
    martymonster is offline Senior Member
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    Hi Bradley, Internet diagnosis is a minefield, you haven't been clear on exactly what the problem is either. So feel free to ignore anything I say as it may not be relevant, but with that said here are some thoughts. Surgery is not an option. Seriously if this could be fixed by surgery then a simple X-Ray would show a clear problem. A bone spur, an arthritic growth narrowing the spinal column, a cyst growing under the knee cap ... whatever. There are many possibilities. Here are two I've had personal experience of. 1. I have flat feet. This means my feet don't sit right and angle in to the centre line of the body. In turn this creates a twisting motion in the lower leg which translates to a lot of problems at the knee. I got to thirty and the pain in my knees was so bad I had to give up running and squatting. I (eventually) went to a Podiatrist who customised two orthotics for my shoes and on the day I put them in the shoes I could run without pain and squat again. My doctor who ordered the X-Rays of my knees literally said 'Nothing wrong with your knees, but I can see by the way you're standing you should go down the corridor to the Podiatrist. I'll tell him you're coming. Take your cheque book.' Best $380 bucks I EVER spent. 2. My wife has a serious hip issue which stems from serious Anterior Pelvic Tilt. This has cursed her for the last two years. She has had to stop running and seriously curtail her lower body work during this period. However about a year ago we got her into a Pilates class, she is now much better and has started her return to running and is slowly bringing up her lower body work. I think that by the end of the year she'll be able to run 5k again. Note the lengthy timeframe on this. Best of luck. Marty

  6. #6
    Maverik is offline Junior Member
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    Bradley,
    You believe that you have a unique and difficult to diagnose problem. You have seen some professionals about the issue and have not received the results desired....Yet you think that someone on the forum will have insight on your uncommon issue or be able to provide the name of a specific Dr that specializes in your unknown problem?

    That is probably not going to happen
    I get it...you're frustrated and desperate to find an answer.

    I bet there are some excellent PTs, DOs, and movement specialists on this forum from time to time.
    My recommendation is:
    Create a post that contains the following information to guide any potential help
    1. List age, weight, height and approx body fat %
    2. How long have you had the problem?
    3. What rehab/prehab protocol have you used? For how long? With complete compliance?
    4. Athletic background
    5. Provide (whole body) video footage of your a) bodyweight squat b) BW lunge c) Light deadlift d) running mechanics e) core strength f) ROM limitations
    6. What does your current exercise routine look like? What does your ideal workout week look like if totally healthy? How many reps/sets for each exercise?

    This may provide someone with the potential to administer helpful info enough to do an "internet analysis".

    Silver lining: I just moved from Albany after living there for 10 years. I had two very successful orthopedic surgeries there with decent PT rehab. There are quality professionals in Albany NY.

    You can always spend your "injured" time getting your upper-body extremely strong. All is not lost!
    Good luck
    Matt

  7. #7
    Moses Correa is offline Senior Member
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    Contact Kathy Dooley: https://www.facebook.com/drkathydooley?fref=ts Just send her a message and set up with her. She is in NYC, good luck my friend

  8. #8
    Bradley is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maverik View Post
    Bradley,
    You believe that you have a unique and difficult to diagnose problem. You have seen some professionals about the issue and have not received the results desired....Yet you think that someone on the forum will have insight on your uncommon issue or be able to provide the name of a specific Dr that specializes in your unknown problem?

    That is probably not going to happen
    I get it...you're frustrated and desperate to find an answer.

    I bet there are some excellent PTs, DOs, and movement specialists on this forum from time to time.
    My recommendation is:
    Create a post that contains the following information to guide any potential help
    1. List age, weight, height and approx body fat %
    2. How long have you had the problem?
    3. What rehab/prehab protocol have you used? For how long? With complete compliance?
    4. Athletic background
    5. Provide (whole body) video footage of your a) bodyweight squat b) BW lunge c) Light deadlift d) running mechanics e) core strength f) ROM limitations
    6. What does your current exercise routine look like? What does your ideal workout week look like if totally healthy? How many reps/sets for each exercise?

    This may provide someone with the potential to administer helpful info enough to do an "internet analysis".

    Silver lining: I just moved from Albany after living there for 10 years. I had two very successful orthopedic surgeries there with decent PT rehab. There are quality professionals in Albany NY.

    You can always spend your "injured" time getting your upper-body extremely strong. All is not lost!
    Good luck
    Matt
    The unknown problem is not unknown. Or at least not unhypothesized. I am pretty sure it's an alignment issue that doctors haven't picked up on. And at least one doctor I've been in contact with thinks I'm right. The problem is finding someone similar who is closer. See here:

    Dear Mr. xxxxxxxx,

    This certainly seems like a rotational malignment. Most of these patients have already been through the medical “mill” after years of useless PT, through useless arthroscopic and other “minimally invasive” procedures, and finally narcotic addiction at the hands of the “pain management” doctors.

    You need to find a competent doctor to do the correct physical examination, order the correct imaging, and then have the guts to act on his/her findings. Unfortunately, there aren’t so many of these people as the work is hard, and the remuneration is low. I am sorry, but I don’t know anyone in your part of the world that regularly takes these cases on.

    Perhaps you should visit me for a day or two, and you will return home with all the answers you seek.
    With best regards,

  9. #9
    Bradley is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maverik View Post

    You can always spend your "injured" time getting your upper-body extremely strong. All is not lost!
    Good luck
    Matt
    My upper body is as strong as ever, and I have noticeable abs (barely). That's a first. But I don't care much for upper body stuff. And I have problems there too. My left shoulder hurts. My elbows hurt. My hands hurt when I do pushups or handstand pushups against a wall. I have put off addressing those things until i fixed my legs, but that has left me injured all over because I've been stuck on legs for 9 years.

  10. #10
    Wolfeye is offline Senior Member
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    Bradley- I'm curious: Do you ever try that inversion stuff? You know, those boards that spin upside down that's on T.V. sometimes?

    The stuff I mentioned you'd do by feel. You know when you've been doing a lot of pressing work & you start "craving" pull-ups or something like that? Sometimes your stomach feels weak & you want to do sit-ups, or something similar for the back, etc... . That might be a better way to go, since it can be hard to plan out exactly what kind of effect this exact number of whatever exercise is going to have & how that relates to fixing a problem.

    As for doctors, be aware that sometimes they interject bullshit into their diagnosising things (things that don't work or aren't safe, things that aren't related thrown in, attaching "riders" to treatment, etc...). You're a dude, so you might not have to worry that much about them trying to probe you or something like that, but you never know.

    Something bizarre that not too many people know about:
    A frequent situation when someone goes to the hospital for car crashes & falls (or anytime they go to the E.R. for trauma) is them giving those people rectal exams. I mention this because things like this gets linked to back pain or issues with the surrounding areas & sometimes this is an imposed situation (they lie, the patient refuses but the medical personnel don't listen & actually hold people down, or simply ambushing them out of nowhere when they log-roll them off the stretcher). There was a guy in New York that walked into a hospital for stitches on his head & they actually forced a rectal exam on him! He even got arrested for hitting one of the doctors during the struggle!

    It's not actually viable for these things, but they SAY that it detects spinal injuries, internal bleeding, broken bones, etc... (actually, abdominal MRIs & CT scans WOULD be good for that & is, apparently, the standard of care). Just figured I'd make that point, because sometimes they come out of nowhere when someone is trying to get help & your situation seems to involve that general region. Either way, when they start treating someone they try to tack-on all kinds of other things to add more costs (tests so they could interpret the results to "find" something, all kinds of bullshit treatments that don't work, medicine that causes other problems, etc...).

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