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Thread: Convict Conditioning Pull Up Grip

  1. #1
    Eoin Kenny is offline Senior Member
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    Default Convict Conditioning Pull Up Grip

    Hello all,

    My question relates to the pull up series. I know most people will use an overhand grip (which I have been doing) because it's what's in the book for the first 6 steps. However, after this it is necessary to use an underhand grip for the harder moves. Since I am in this for the long haul, I want to make sure I progress properly. It seems to me that it would make more sense to practice the earlier moves with an underhand grip (chin up) to help condition yourself for the later moves when this kind of grip is the only way forward.

    What do you all think? Personally I find the underhand grip easier, which is why I used the overhand one. But I want to be ready for the later steps like uneven pull ups.

  2. #2
    joby848 is offline Junior Member
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    Hello, Eoin Kenny!

    I haven't reached the ultimate goal in true one arm pullup, but I have reached the half one arm pullup so I'm near there!

    When you use underhand grip, it's called chin-up. Majority say it's easier version, That's because you are bringing in more activation of your gun shows (biceps). I can do both uneven pullups and chin-ups.

    It's more of preference. Pull-ups would take some help from biceps away and force your big lat muscles to activate more. If you work on overhand grip aka pullups, your body will get better at that movement pattern, and you will eventually reach one arm pullup. If you hit a variant where you are having trouble with overhand grip, but you still can do 1-3 reps with some energy left... You should focus on high sets and low reps, and before you know it, you will be pro at overhand grip or pullups! one arm pullup and one arm chinup are equally amazing to see from bystanders side of view lol.

    Joby

  3. #3
    ComradeCat is offline Senior Member
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    Lets start with this. There is no right grip for pull-ups.

    An overhand (pronated) grip, where your palms point outwards so that they are facing away from you requires more muscle recruitment from your back and lats (vs your biceps and triceps).

    A underhand (supinated) grip where your palms point inwards so that they are facing you, has greater recruitment from your biceps and triceps (vs your back and lats).


    Is one better than the other? Nope.

    Should you prioritise one over the other? Maybe - this would depend on what you're training for.

    If you're training just to achieve the OAPU, then shifting towards the grip that easiest for you would be the most effective. For most people, their entire posterior tends to be weak, which is why the underhand grip tends to be their stronger position.

    If you're training to get stronger throughout your entire body, then use both the underhand and overhand grips to train all parts of your body. Just be aware that regardless of which grip you're using, your arms and posterior chain will come into play. The variable factor here simply being the level of muscle recruitment.
    martymonster and Eoin Kenny like this.

  4. #4
    Perkelnik is offline Member
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    What ComradeCat said. I would just add that it is a good idea to use different grips for more variety in your training, especially during "milking" periods.

  5. #5
    hoxton is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Perkelnik View Post
    "milking" periods.
    what is milking?

  6. #6
    martymonster is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by hoxton View Post
    what is milking?
    When you work an exercise over several weeks. The aim being to really getting to know all the subtleties of the movement, building up connective tissue strength and just generally soaking up all the goodness that it can bring.

    Paul Wade used the term a lot in CC1 and 2.

  7. #7
    Eoin Kenny is offline Senior Member
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    I think Perk is referring to a period where you stay on one exercise (exp full pull ups) for a while. In such an instance it is wise to vary it up if you are at progression standard, just to get a variety of benefits.

    Thanks a lot for the replies everyone! I think, since either grip will ultimately build the same muscles it makes more sense for me to build up using the underhand grip then. I am ultimately training for the OAPU so I should start as I mean to continue. Besides, I reread the pull ups section in CC last night and the Coach does clearly state that either grip is fine in early stages, despite specifying overhand in the exercises themselves.

    Well, with this new grip I should make intermediate standard this week at least lol.

  8. #8
    martymonster is offline Senior Member
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    What ComCat said, plus....

    Don't forget that a neutral grip (hands facing each other) can be a lot easier on the elbows. This is very handy if you suffer from tendinitis.

    You can also use rings rather than a fixed pullup bar. The rings allow a more natural rotation in the elbow which can help if again you suffer from tendinitis. But the big kicker about rings is the instability is an extra dimension you can add to your progression chain.

    And then there is also the towel grip. This is a sort of half way point between Neutral grip and Ring grips, but with the added joy of using a vertical hand rather than a horizontal hand. Your grip strength will be tested! Simply throw a towel over the bar and grip both ends then do your pullups. Feel free to hate me.
    Last edited by martymonster; 01-12-2015 at 06:30 AM.

  9. #9
    hoxton is offline Member
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    Hmm, rings, im currently suffering from tendonitis, ill look into this..

  10. #10
    ComradeCat is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by hoxton View Post
    Hmm, rings, im currently suffering from tendonitis, ill look into this..
    If it were up to me, I'd strongly recommend rings any time over a fixed pull-up bar. The dynamic nature of rings places you at a disadvantage over a fixed pull up bar because the inherent instability of the rings demands a greater level of recruitment from not only your stabiliser muscles, but also your connective tissues and tendons.

    Try doing the same number of pull ups on rings instead of a fixed bar, I can tell you that you simply will tire out before you can even hit the same number of reps. Training on rings will up the muscle recruitment as well as the neurological demands to stabilise and pull. After a period on the rings, you should find that doing pull ups on a fixed bar is suddenly much easier.

    Quote Originally Posted by martymonster View Post
    Simply throw a towel over the bar and grip both ends then do your pullups. Feel free to hate me.
    You ain't gone done recommend the really bad one yet. I suggest, false grip pull-ups on rings. That one hurts like a knife in the back.
    Last edited by ComradeCat; 01-12-2015 at 06:39 AM.

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