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  1. #1
    phreebie is offline Junior Member
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    Default Hanging knee/leg raises

    Hi,

    My pull up bar is a door mounted one and is really too low to effectively do proper leg raises - knee raises are just ok, but I'd prefer to be higher.

    While I know it isn't as described in CC, would it be detrimental to do knee raises, for a little while, from the TOP of the pull up position? I'm thinking this would also be good for the biceps?

    A better pull up station is in the budget plan, and the only park around here with suitable bars is on the other side of town. I'm thinking of what I can do where I am with what I have right now. I can go there sometimes, but I need something for when I can't.

    Flat raises no longer seem to be doing it for me, or would I be better off doing planks?

    Thoughts?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Maelstrom's Avatar
    Maelstrom is offline Administrator
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    Default

    It's not a bad idea, but definitely a different focus. With the bent arms at the top of the pull up position the focus would be much different, and probably the sets a bit shorter. One of the reasons the straight arm regular version is great is that it requires a certain level of upper body flexibility and mobility to do the exercise while keeping the arms straight. Also to fight the tendency of swinging, there should be a fair amount of tension in the grip. VERY SLOW flat raises would probably still be challenging, keeping feet just an inch off the ground...

    Where are you in the Convict Conditioning Hanging Leg Raise progression at the moment? (flat raises? knee raises?)
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  3. #3
    Eoin Kenny is offline Senior Member
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    Default

    I'd say it's okay as long as you're careful not to overrtain your biceps/arms.

  4. #4
    Perkelnik is offline Member
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    Although I dont know how low your bar is. If you can hang with knees bent, you might try something inbetween - start with knee raises and as soon as possible stretch your legs to get the amount of leverage as intended. The "pause" for stretching the legs during the movement might compensate the lack of leverage in the beginning of the raise.

  5. #5
    Numiz Nate is offline Junior Member
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    The people above gave good advice- and I'd like to add to it. I'm pretty much in the same predicament as you, although I found some alternatives to a door-mounted bar. Do you happen to have a tree branch you could hang from? I personally use that. If all else fails, you got an attic? A friend of mine doesn't have a door-mounted bar so occasionally he does pull-ups from his attic opening. You don't have to have a fancy polished bar with your desired thickness (still talking about hanging bars, here) to use. You'd be surprised what you have to use when your ideal thought isn't hanging around (pun city all day, folks).

  6. #6
    phreebie is offline Junior Member
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    Default

    Thanks so much for the feedback!

    I was about half way through the knee raises progression when I got frustrated with the bar and went back to flat raises and a plank progression, but I don't feel that is really doing what I need.

    So I was looking to go back to the beginning of knee raises. Even with knees bent, from a full hang, my feet brush the floor. I guess I need to find a different bar.

  7. #7
    pixelzombie is offline Member
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    I was doing the karate style chin ups before my trigger finger flared up on me, it definitely works your core. Another option you can try on the floor is the hollow body hold, it seems easy until you actually do it yourself.


  8. #8
    MostlyFull is offline Senior Member
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    If you have a ceiling entry to an attic, you can hang there. Water pipes in basement, maybe. Stair steps from the back side. I had to strap my power tower to cinder blocks to be able to hang from that. You can find something if you look around.

    Good Luck.

  9. #9
    Eoin Kenny is offline Senior Member
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    I use a football goal to hang from sometimes. Or other times a metal staircase, even a tree branch. I think you can find something close to you if you're imaginative enough!

  10. #10
    Springdragon is offline Member
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    Default

    I had this problem too, since I only had a doorway pull up bar for the longest time. I attempted straight leg raises with bent arms but dropped that pretty quick since it wasn't doing anything for my core--my arms fatigued way faster than my abs. I ended up cycling through a few different core exercises to compensate:

    1. Hanging partial straight leg raises. Hang from the doorway pull up bar with straight arms and just do partial straight leg raises through as great an ROM as you can. Overall this is probably about as effective as normal straight leg raises, because for hanging leg raises your abs work harder the higher your legs are lifted, with maximum tension reached when they're parallel to the ground (and zero tension when you're simply hanging vertically). So even if your ROM is only from 45 to 90 degrees with your partial hanging leg raises, you're still hitting the range of maximum tension and only missing out on the relatively easy portion that involves lifting your legs from 0 to 45 degrees.

    2. L-sits. Pretty self explanatory.

    3. L-sit leg raises with gymnastics rings. I hung a pair of gymnastics rings from my pull up bar high enough for my toes to clear the floor, took the L-sit position and did straight leg raises.

    4. The..."Jewish sit up." I have no idea if this is what they're really called, but it's kind of like an easier version of an ab wheel roll out for people who don't own an ab wheel. A Dragondoor member posted a video here a few months ago, and the exercise stuck in my head because of the weird name he gave it and I played around with it for a while. Here's the video:



    5. Dragon flags. If you have a good bench or some other sturdy piece of furniture to hold onto, the dragon flag (and its progressions, of course, since you probably won't be strong enough to do this right away for reps) is an awesome exercise and my favorite on this list.

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