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  1. #1
    Wooly1984 is offline Junior Member
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    Default Getting from zero fitness to elite ,, need help

    Hi Guys Ok Im new here and heard really good things about this site so any help you can give me is appreciated.

    I'm 30 year old male and have lifted weights for around 3 years.
    I've been in ok shape for this time but Ive never really gained strength only size and body fat and never ever got any id be fitness id be dead after sprinting a 100m and can barely run for five minutes.

    im really looking to try and change my whole training and nutrition plan to get where i want to be.
    im a big reader and after reading lots of books about military guys like British SAS, US Navy SEALS etc the shape those guys get in is unreal

    Ok i understand those people are a different level but to even get somewhere like them, condition my body, drop my BF from 19% to as low as i can get it (ive had it at 13% before) become fit in endurance would change the slump ive fell into.

    Ive read lots of Navy Seal training etc and its just not possible in my lifestyle at the moment to be able to swim for several hours a day then run etc.

    if theres any references, advice, books etc anyone can advise to help me go from a totally unfit guy to elite fitness it would be really appreciated
    I understand theres no magic fix, no quick pill here but anything that can give me strength, speed, endurance and good nutrition like the elite forces

    Thanks for reading guys, any help as said is appreciated

    Wooly

  2. #2
    AndrewR is offline Senior Member
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    So you want SEAL like fitness without actually doing the work? That's going to be a tough order. To become elite at anything physical you need to put in the time. That's what really separates the elite - the total devotion to achieving the end result.

    Try this - How to Reach Freak Level Fitness | Breaking Muscle

    This - The Reality of Combat and Special Forces Training | Breaking Muscle

    This - How to Assemble a SEAL Astronaut Ninja Training Program | Breaking Muscle

    This - SEAL fit | readpt.com

    And this - Commando training and the fallacy of the WOD | readpt.com

    Buy this - 8 Weeks to SEALFIT: A Navy SEAL's Guide to Unconventional Training for Physical and Mental Toughness: Mark Divine: 9781250040541: Amazon.com: Books

    This - Unbeatable Mind: Forge Resiliency and Mental Toughness to Succeed at an Elite Level: Mark Divine: 9781495393433: Amazon.com: Books

    OPnce you've done all that and maybe had a think about goals vs priorities we can probably have a more detailed talk. But those will be a good starting point.

  3. #3
    ad5ly is offline Senior Member
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    You need to more clearly define the goal "elite fitness". You express an interest in Navy Seals and other elite military units. I am not a Navy Seal but am former military. I will say this, that an individual that successfully completes all phases of Seal training and wears the Seal Trident on his uniform is an individual that is DRIVEN to that demanding kind of work. Joining the Seals was not simply a whim or spur of the moment decision on his part. Most likely he has been preparing most of his life for this. FIRST place this preparation happens is in the MIND. Those that wear the Seal Trident have a MENTAL TOUGHNESS that far exceeds that of ordinary men. They also fully understand that its not just all about the individual. Its about the team and missions. A Seal's reputation will always precede him. The Seal community like the the aviation or submarine community is small and everyone knows what they need to know about you. Are you an asset? Are you a liability? Word gets out. Work on your MENTAL TOUGHNESS first of all. Everything else will fall in line just by your sheer force of will. Find a program that fits your goals. Know your weaknesses. Shore up your weaknesses first. Commit and recommit to the goal everyday. Watching RAMBO movies won't get you there...Dennis

  4. #4
    GreenSoup is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wooly1984 View Post
    if theres any references, advice, books etc anyone can advise to help me go from a totally unfit guy to elite fitness it would be really appreciated
    I understand theres no magic fix, no quick pill here but anything that can give me strength, speed, endurance and good nutrition like the elite forces
    Elite forces do not have good nutrition. See Danny Kavadlo's abs book on some nutrition.

    Do you want to do barbell work, kettlebell work, bodyweight or to mix it up? If you don't know what you want, any road will get you there.

  5. #5
    AndrewR is offline Senior Member
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    While I know he says he wants to drop body fat I'd be very careful about trying to gain high levels of performance while on a restrictive fat loss diet. The two are nearly mutually exclusive and trying to restrict while training hard is a quick path to adrenal fatigue. I've not met any SEAL/ SAS type who ate a restricted diet. You simply can't if you want to perform at that kind of level.

  6. #6
    Eoin Kenny is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrewR View Post
    I've not met any SEAL/ SAS type who ate a restricted diet. You simply can't if you want to perform at that kind of level.
    I would feel in my head, that in order to perform at a high level, I need to be a a low bodyfat, so in that way they are not exclusive. However I have to agree, food makes me feel better training.

  7. #7
    AndrewR is offline Senior Member
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    It's the opposite. Lowish perhaps, but not cover model low. And athletic is 12-17% <10% is starting to get into visible abs territory for most guys. You'd never survive all the cold water immersion that SEAL candidates undergo during BUDS. A little bodyfat goes a long way to help insulate you. There are some freaks with very low levels - I know of one SEAL who had to wear a wetsuit even during pool sessions as his bf was so low he was unable to stay in the water long enough to learn scuba technique otherwise. Meanwhile the other guys were in shorts. Those same low levels of bf also don't help you float - and there's a test for that too called drown proofing where you need to float with your hands and feet tied together for a period before then bobbing up and down from the bottom to the surface for a few minutes - lean bodies sink.

    Then there's the extremely long days on limited food - if you come in super lean what are you going to feed your body with during the days where food isn't around? I've seen plenty of those guys wash out from Commando selection when I did it.

  8. #8
    Chris Hansen is offline Senior Member
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    There's a great book by Dan John called "Intervention: Course Corrections for the Athlete and Trainer" which might be appropriate. Anyway, anything by Dan John is worth reading and you can get the kindle edition for 8 dollars.

  9. #9
    Eoin Kenny is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrewR View Post
    It's the opposite. Lowish perhaps, but not cover model low. And athletic is 12-17% <10% is starting to get into visible abs territory for most guys. You'd never survive all the cold water immersion that SEAL candidates undergo during BUDS.
    Have you done that training yourself? I've noticed lately that that seems to be a good range of BF% for me to enjoy training, recover well and advance steadily. In conjunction with diet, rest etc... Even my pull ups got better once I started eating myself full again.

  10. #10
    Jethu is offline Member
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    Some good advice and resources from AndrewR there.

    When I started my fitness journey I was training for overall fitness and endurance, which seems like what you're going for. I have since shifted my focus more toward strength and mass, with a bit of conditioning built in, but I know a bit about endurance training (specifically running- I was a respected member of my high school Cross Country team), and learned quite a bit on my own with trial and error.

    Here's a routine I did before I moved to strength training- circuit style with 30-60 seconds rest between exercises:

    -Run in place, 2 minutes
    -Jumping jacks, 1 minute
    -Pushup variation, 15-20 reps (do a fairly easy version, this isn't strength training)
    -Dumbell rows, 15-20 reps
    -Bodyweight squats 15-30 reps, moderate pace
    -Lying legraise variation 15-20 reps
    -Dumbell Overhead press 15-20 reps
    -Take a drink of water, rest 60-90 seconds, then repeat the circuit

    Start with 2 circuits, once you get comfortable, add a third, then a fourth, then a 5th.

    Go out for a nice jog as far as you can 5 days a week. Your endurance will increase rapidly. You can go from being able to run 2 blocks, to 2 miles in a very short period of time.

    Pay attention to breathing. You should be breathing hard, but comfortable. If you can't say a few words between breaths, back off a little bit. A general rule we had in distance running was two steps while breathing in, and two steps while breathing out. It works wonders.

    There is no benefit in working TOO hard- you should be working hard, but you should also realize that you aren't 15 anymore and your recovery abilities aren't 15 either. If you really want to push yourself to see what you're made of, do it in the last MINUTES (seriously like, 1 or 2 minutes) of your session.
    Last edited by Jethu; 04-24-2015 at 06:36 PM. Reason: Adding detail.

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