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Thread: turkish getup - pushing torso off the floor step

  1. #1
    abexman is offline Member
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    Default turkish getup - pushing torso off the floor step

    I had a question on the turkish getup transition stage from the position where you have the kettlebell pushed up with your lifting arm but are lying on your back, to the next step where you push your torso off the floor with lifting side knee bent, and opposite arm extended and pushing off the floor. I can try and add a diagram if that helps.... I know you are supposed to keep your opposite arm straight out to your side, but it would seem that in that position you cannot easily generate a force straight up.

    In that transition it is easy with a lighter bell but as you get heavier weights seems challenging. I saw video of Steve Kotter and it he actually stomped down with the lifting side knee to generate momentum to bring the bell and his torso up. I also noticed myself if I rotate my torso towards thes sky that helps too. It seems important to keep the entire trunk and head as one monolith too. Does this sound right? Do you have any technique(s) or form do you suggest?

  2. #2
    Ace83 is offline Senior Member
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    Default I hope this helps...

    First, "Hard roll" 5-10 times each side

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=poawu9InFrQ

    This will help teach your muscles how to link up in this move

    Second, "baby getup"

    The ?Baby GetUp? | Stop Chasing Pain

    Follow the instructions in the article and video (do 3-5 reps with a 60 sec side plank)
    This helps activate your obliques and links up rotational pull from a stable base.

    Lastly, 45 degree arm angle with a solid object.

    Your down arm should be at a 45 degree angle from your body.
    Put a kettle bell or heavy object into your down hand.
    When you roll to elbow, push down hard with your planted foot and pull hard with your down hand.

    There is more, but if you devot yourself to these drills and pay attention to the details given in the links, you will master this movement and find it to be similar to any other strength move.


    Good luck, don't give up, you can master it if you keep at it!
    pixelzombie likes this.

  3. #3
    postandspread is offline Senior Member
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ace83 View Post
    First, "Hard roll" 5-10 times each side

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=poawu9InFrQ

    This will help teach your muscles how to link up in this move

    Second, "baby getup"

    The ?Baby GetUp? | Stop Chasing Pain

    Follow the instructions in the article and video (do 3-5 reps with a 60 sec side plank)
    This helps activate your obliques and links up rotational pull from a stable base.
    This is interesting but I can't see it helped me a lot. Maybe a little.


    Lastly, 45 degree arm angle with a solid object.

    Your down arm should be at a 45 degree angle from your body.
    Put a kettle bell or heavy object into your down hand.
    When you roll to elbow, push down hard with your planted foot and pull hard with your down hand.

    There is more, but if you devot yourself to these drills and pay attention to the details given in the links, you will master this movement and find it to be similar to any other strength move.
    A easier progression seems to be keeping the arm at 90˚ to the torso. One could gradually move the arm down to 45˚ over time. Two other things I've found useful: first, is to do "negatives", i.e. lowering oneself with control from elbow to supine. The second is to keep the hip flexors of the bent leg tight and extended during the roll-to-elbow phase. But there is no doubt that pushing down hard with the planted foot is vital. That may require positioning the foot fairly close to the butt. Probably an anthropometry thing.
    Last edited by postandspread; 05-12-2015 at 02:13 AM.
    "Imagine what you'll know tomorrow." - Agent K in MiB.

  4. #4
    GeoffreyLevens is offline Senior Member
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    Default

    Interesting to me as I have been out of the kettlebell loop for couple years due to extensive travel/meditation retreat and need to "reset". Before I stopped I was doing TGU's w/ 24 kg no issues. But now seem to have struggle rolling to elbow w/ no weight at all!!!! YIKES!!!! Just got and read Simple & Sinister (Pavel's latest) and seems to be a good re-entry point for me so TGU's will feature in my daily menu. Practice practice practice....

  5. #5
    Ace83 is offline Senior Member
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by postandspread View Post
    This is interesting but I can't see it helped me a lot. Maybe a little.



    A easier progression seems to be keeping the arm at 90˚ to the torso. One could gradually move the arm down to 45˚ over time. Two other things I've found useful: first, is to do "negatives", i.e. lowering oneself with control from elbow to supine. The second is to keep the hip flexors of the bent leg tight and extended during the roll-to-elbow phase. But there is no doubt that pushing down hard with the planted foot is vital. That may require positioning the foot fairly close to the butt. Probably an anthropometry thing.
    I'm surprised to hear the hard roll didn't help you Post.
    I don't train people anymore, but after I started doing the "original strength" resets everyday the roll to elbow (which was one of my favorite parts) became super easy.

    The other drill with the hand on an object is the easiest way I came across to teach people to link their glute to the opposing lat and dig in with the elbow to create torque.
    Eventually the pattern becomes strong enough that they don't need it and we removed the object.
    At that point they have the requisite strength to do the move with out compensations and can start loading it like you would any other strength move.

    I'm sorry it didn't work out for you, If you found a better way to teach people that's awesome.

    Also, I haven't been on the forum in awhile, and and its good to see you're still here.

  6. #6
    postandspread is offline Senior Member
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ace83 View Post
    I'm surprised to hear the hard roll didn't help you Post.
    I don't train people anymore, but after I started doing the "original strength" resets everyday the roll to elbow (which was one of my favorite parts) became super easy.

    The other drill with the hand on an object is the easiest way I came across to teach people to link their glute to the opposing lat and dig in with the elbow to create torque.
    Eventually the pattern becomes strong enough that they don't need it and we removed the object.
    At that point they have the requisite strength to do the move with out compensations and can start loading it like you would any other strength move.

    I'm sorry it didn't work out for you, If you found a better way to teach people that's awesome.

    Also, I haven't been on the forum in awhile, and and its good to see you're still here.
    Thanks for the kind words, Ace83! I'm only trying to teach myself (not the right circumstances to seek in situ expert help) and tricky going it is. I've long suspected that having at least moderately strong abs is practically a prerequisite for the roll to elbow. Whenever I trained obliques and RA for a continuous period of time, the roll has become noticeably easier. The heavy object for cueing or assistance is one thing I haven't yet tried, so I will.

    @GeoffreyLevens If you don't mind speculating, what, in your opinion, is the specific reason you struggling to roll to elbow?
    "Imagine what you'll know tomorrow." - Agent K in MiB.

  7. #7
    GeoffreyLevens is offline Senior Member
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    Had breakthrough training w/out weight this morning. I had lyme disease about 12 years ago and it seemed to dramatically aggravate my tendency to sensory-motor amnesia in various muscle groups making it much more difficult to teach different 'parts' to fire when needed.

    Using the cues of driving elbow into ground while firing the lat hard and pushing hard off the foot of the bent leg helped a lot. Then I was playing w/ coming up a various angles, all the way from sort of diagonal sit-up to almost circular rollover and at least his morning seem to have found an easy groove. I plan to "grease that groove" throughout the day...

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