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  1. #1
    michaelfish is offline Junior Member
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    Default Progression goals for kids

    I'm a youth football coach just finishing my first season. I worked with a "no-cut" "minimum play" team. About half our players were new to football and a large percentage of them new to organized sport (and a couple possibly new to basic human movement). I intend to offer a progressive calisthenics program during the off season using the "Big 6" progression as a model. I'm in planning stages and realize my young athletes are far from any step 2 movements. However, I want to reward them with new exercises as appropriately as possible. I'm sure many of them will surprise me, but I think the mastery goals include too many reps for kids aged 9-12. My hope is to have a majority of them at level 5 on 4 of 6 movements by next June 1; I plan to start the second week of Nov.

    If anyone has any ideas about mastery goals for this age group, please share. I don't want to insult Coach Wade by suggesting we move too fast. Maybe step 5 is too lofty a goal...

    Also, if anyone has any input on how to keep this training fun and interesting, I would love to hear it. (I am also including a "speed" component to the course). Thanks comrades, Mike

  2. #2
    305pelusa Guest

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    It makes sense to me that you can judge "progression" not by the amount of reps, but by the quality of reps. If you find they have control throughout the full ROM, that they keep correct pelvic tilt when necessary, and that they can bang out sets of double digits (10+ reps), I think that's sufficient to move on to the next exercise.

    Essentially, approach it as skills they're learning. And once they can comfortably work with a Step, you just move on to the next. Additionally, this will naturally make training more fun. They won't dread it because they think they have to hit a number, but rather will look forward to it because calisthenics is more fun when you think about your movement through space.

    Quote Originally Posted by michaelfish View Post
    Thanks comrades, Mike
    Darn, the nostalgia.

  3. #3
    michaelfish is offline Junior Member
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    Thank you. I like that approach. I read the cautionary words on patience and not wanting to advance until one gets the most out of the particular movement. I think it's correct though that I can tell if they've got it or not. I want to teach them all they are capable of learning and performing safely. Now still working on ideas to keep it fun. Individual progression is nice and challenging, but not everyone is motivated that way. Take care, Mike

  4. #4
    ad5ly is offline Senior Member
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    You are doing the Lord's work in working with 9-12 year olds in football. What the kids want at that age is fun and some recognition and atta boys. Playing and winning is the thrill. Calisthenics will be viewed as either boring or too hard by most. They need to know the "whys" as well as the "hows" in what they are doing. Are you (the coach) able to demonstrate a one armed push up or pistol? Do you know anyone who can show the boys what can be accomplished if they train diligently? A demo of strength can go a long ways toward giving the boys the fortitude to work hard. To give them a picture of what awaits them. Training discipline at a young age is difficult. Patience and long term goals is hard to conceive at that age. Sadly most boys drop of physical training when they hit High School. But you can still be an influence to those that want it...Dennis

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