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Thread: Training Frequency

  1. #1
    Eoin Kenny is offline Senior Member
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    Default Training Frequency

    So I think that training hanging leg raises once (or even twice) a week have plateaued for me.

    I'm going to try and train the movement 3-4 times a week instead to see if that makes progress easier. I read a bit about this in Al's books when he says that as you advance, your frequency has to also follow suit.

    Does anyone have experience in this? Should I just do 2-3 sets to near failure or what do you think? Would adding in sit ups, drop sets etc be of any benefit?

  2. #2
    gimx is offline Member
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    If you add exercises, I suggest you L-Sit, Curl Up and Stir The Pot by Dr. McGill (google it). I can't reply for frequency because people are different. Twice is enough for me with one set of each exercises.

  3. #3
    NSmetzer is offline Senior Member
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    I will only share my own experience as it applies to me right now. Currently I am doing the PCC Century Test as a workout every single day I am able. I end that with One-Arm Swings for 5 sets of 10 per arm (so 100 total). I am going to be doing this every single day until I can do each movement in one set. I will ensure that I am easily able to do each movement in one set by repeating it for at least a week. Then I will conservatively add reps.

    This seemed like it was going to be too easy, but it seems to be just right. I have seen faster improvements in two weeks than I have in the past 6 months. Basically, pick a number of reps, perform that same number of reps every day, once you hit that number in one set for a good week, add more reps, rinse and repeat. I personally found that "sets to failure" is too vague for my taste. I like a real number to shoot for and master before setting yet another goal to achieve.

    Like gimx there said, everyone will find their own path.

  4. #4
    Malchir is offline Junior Member
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    What step are you on? Personally I've been training them doing 3 sets of 5-12 reps, 1-2 days a week and progressed to step 10 this way. 3 minute rest intervals between sets. I skipped the frog raises, instead increasing the difficulty by extending the legs further and lifting my feet higher. My method is that when I can do 12 reps first set and at least 8 in the following two sets, I increase the difficulty of the exercise, go back to 3 sets of at least 5 or so, then slowly build up.

    I usually don't do other abdominal work, although in periods I have done L sits on non-training days.

    I think the best progress you could get would be doing them every other day, provided you eat and rest right and don't train to failure. I think a lot of people get stuck because they don't eat right or train so hard their body can't recover in time for the next session.

    Your body needs time to recover if you're going hard at the leg raises. Hit them hard, then lay off for at least a day. For a while I did them once per week as the CC book suggests, and that worked for a while. But when it stopped working I upped the training frequency and progressed again.

  5. #5
    Eoin Kenny is offline Senior Member
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    Thanks for the replies everyone, I took it all on board. It seems that I just wasn't doing enough to progress anymore at the level I was at.

    By upping the amount of times I train a week I've already seen huge improvements in a few days (33% strength increase, crazy). I should make good progress in this the next while.

    It's actually been a valuable lesson for me overall, I can apply this to all my other exercises.

  6. #6
    Chris Hansen is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eoin Kenny View Post
    I read a bit about this in Al's books when he says that as you advance, your frequency has to also follow suit.
    That's interesting. In regards to big barbell lifts, like the power lifts, I've read that as you advance you have to train less frequently because you're able to work your body hard enough that it takes longer to recover.

    It would be interesting to understand the context better. I suppose exercises like pushups and pullups don't stress the body the same way that a 500 pound deadlift would and so they play by different rules.

  7. #7
    Eoin Kenny is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Hansen View Post
    That's interesting. In regards to big barbell lifts, like the power lifts, I've read that as you advance you have to train less frequently because you're able to work your body hard enough that it takes longer to recover.

    It would be interesting to understand the context better. I suppose exercises like pushups and pullups don't stress the body the same way that a 500 pound deadlift would and so they play by different rules.
    Hey Chris, I was going to go into this but I didn't want to over complicate it (using what I think is really going on) in case I was wrong. But I feel compelled to try now.

    There's something about leg raises, as I progress in the CC progressions, I just cannot cause the kind of muscular fatigue which would make a week's rest necessary. In fact, a week's rest seems to be exactly what I need in order to maintain rather than improve. The only way I can is if I add in a lot of knee raises, but my grip would give out before I fatigued my abs enough. Also, they don't really improve the straight leg version hugely I think, you need to practice as close as possible to what you want to improve (makes sense).

    With push ups and pull ups though, I am still making progress with just once a week training. I think lately this has to do with the huge muscular fatigue caused by doing 4 uneven sets though (60 push ups this week for example), as opposed to 2 sets previously on the bilateral work. Actually... that would explain why it took me so long to hit progression in step 6 push ups, I needed to train more often I think.

    I guess you could cause good muscle fatigue on hanging leg raises if you did LOTS of sets, but I'm not so sure it would work well :/ Training the core is really funny, it's quite different to the other Big 5 from CC I think.

    As I said, at least I now know one good option for when my moves start to plateau in the future. kek you never stop learning with this stuff!!! Probably why I love it. But it kind of comes down to doing more strength based training in leg raises as opposed to muscle glycogen draining. I suppose I could try do 10 sets of leg raises once a week instead.
    Last edited by Eoin Kenny; 12-04-2015 at 07:57 AM.

  8. #8
    305pelusa Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by Eoin Kenny View Post
    With push ups and pull ups though, I am still making progress with just once a week training. I think lately this has to do with the huge muscular fatigue caused by doing 4 uneven sets though (60 push ups this week for example), as opposed to 2 sets previously on the bilateral work. Actually... that would explain why it took me so long to hit progression in step 6 push ups, I needed to train more often I think.
    Very good conclusion dude. You're getting the hang of this stuff

    Quote Originally Posted by Eoin Kenny View Post
    As I said, at least I now know one good option for when my moves start to plateau in the future.
    I think everytime someone in DD has asked about plateuing, they get these obscure answers like "make sure your form is good", "follow the tempo", "think about your breathing", BS. I've always told them the same thing. "Up the volume". It is incredible how well it works. It's a shame you're just learning this now after a whole year. Definitely something you should always look at as soon as progress stalls.

    Quote Originally Posted by Eoin Kenny View Post
    I guess you could cause good muscle fatigue on hanging leg raises if you did LOTS of sets, but I'm not so sure it would work well :/
    It would work well too. It would be ideal to have an extra training day, as that will let you get more "easy" volume. But some people's schedules can be tight, so maybe just adding more sets is more conceivable. It still works like a charm.

  9. #9
    Eoin Kenny is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by 305pelusa View Post
    Very good conclusion dude. You're getting the hang of this stuff
    Thanks, I think so too.

    Quote Originally Posted by 305pelusa View Post
    I think everytime someone in DD has asked about plateuing, they get these obscure answers like "make sure your form is good", "follow the tempo", "think about your breathing", BS. I've always told them the same thing. "Up the volume". It is incredible how well it works. It's a shame you're just learning this now after a whole year. Definitely something you should always look at as soon as progress stalls.
    I can see how that would frustrate you, the question is, when to up the intensity of one training day or when to keep training the same but do it more often each week? Which is better and why? I suppose that it depends on your schedule and what you can fit in. Right now 2-3 sets done 3-4 times a week feels right for my hanging ab work. I almost feel like I could get away with training it 7 times a week actually, I could be getting ahead of myself though.

    Quote Originally Posted by 305pelusa View Post
    It would work well too. It would be ideal to have an extra training day, as that will let you get more "easy" volume. But some people's schedules can be tight, so maybe just adding more sets is more conceivable. It still works like a charm.
    Which do you prefer doing?

  10. #10
    Chris Hansen is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by 305pelusa View Post
    I think everytime someone in DD has asked about plateuing, they get these obscure answers like "make sure your form is good", "follow the tempo", "think about your breathing", BS. I've always told them the same thing. "Up the volume". It is incredible how well it works.
    I think this is how Mr. Wade intended it to be. I'm pretty sure he's explained that the programs he gives are deliberately conservative but that you can increase the volume or make modifications if you find that you need to.

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