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  1. #1
    Bradley is offline Senior Member
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    Nov 2008
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    Default Please look at my quads

    See below. My legs have been bothering me for over a decade and no one has been able to help. I've posted here numerous times about them. They feel out of alignment, unstable, and it feels like my lower quads don't work, are basically dead. This picture illustrates that.

    I did a cross-fit style workout as part of training to play rugby, which I may or may not end up playing. Shortly after one of the workouts which involved a high number of low weight squatting movements, I noticed inflammation of my quads themselves. The inflammation perfectly illustrate one aspect of how my legs feel. Please see the attached photos. You'll see the bulge of VMO and lateralis adjacent to the patella. However, probably 4-6 inches above that, there is another bulge, which is not normally there. The bulge followed along the grain structure of the quads that I see in photos online. And the space between the secondary bulge that is due to inflammation and the kneecap, that part of the quad below it, closer to the kneecap, is the part of my quad that feels dead, like I can't use the muscle that is there to generate any force.
    I'm just hoping someone can shed some light on what this might mean.quads1a.jpg

  2. #2
    RyanH is offline Senior Member
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    Default

    It means you need to see a specialist.

    The rectus femorus and vastus intermedius (under the rectus) are in that area. Rectus femoris is the most commonly injured quad muscle because its the only one that crosses 2 joints. It performs hip flexion, in addition to, knee extension. This is assuming the problem is muscular.

  3. #3
    NSmetzer is offline Senior Member
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    Default

    Answer yourself these questions.

    Did your muscle "cramp" in some way and the bulge formed after? If so, it's a knot, left untreated can wreak havoc. I have had knots form in places that cause pain and numbness in other areas. Maybe find a massage therapist and see what they can do about the "bulges".

    Did this issue form as a result of a previous injury that seemed minor, was ignored, so you continued to life and workout despite the problem? If so, consult a doctor, and maybe get yourself to a physical therapist or seek some other medical route to resolve the issue.

  4. #4
    Bradley is offline Senior Member
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RyanH View Post
    It means you need to see a specialist.

    The rectus femorus and vastus intermedius (under the rectus) are in that area. Rectus femoris is the most commonly injured quad muscle because its the only one that crosses 2 joints. It performs hip flexion, in addition to, knee extension. This is assuming the problem is muscular.
    I've seen numerous specialists over the past 12 years.

    The problem isn't RF or VI. I don't think it's a problem with the other muscles either. I think it's an alignment issue preventing part of the vastus lateralis and vmo from working, hence the dead spot. The bulge is there because the those parts of the VMO and VL work, but the other part closer to the kneecap does not.

  5. #5
    Bradley is offline Senior Member
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by NSmetzer View Post
    Answer yourself these questions.

    Did your muscle "cramp" in some way and the bulge formed after? If so, it's a knot, left untreated can wreak havoc. I have had knots form in places that cause pain and numbness in other areas. Maybe find a massage therapist and see what they can do about the "bulges".

    Did this issue form as a result of a previous injury that seemed minor, was ignored, so you continued to life and workout despite the problem? If so, consult a doctor, and maybe get yourself to a physical therapist or seek some other medical route to resolve the issue.
    I've seen 20+ each of doctors and PT's. That's why I'm resorting to the internet.

    It was not a cramp. It was not a knot. The prove the feeling I have of the VMO and VL being dead close to the kneecap,.

  6. #6
    RyanH is offline Senior Member
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    Nov 2008
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    Default

    Did any of these specialists perform any imaging studies (MRI, ultrasound, etc.)? If you didn't already, I would recommend finding someone who is NKT certified. You can see if any are close to you here: Certified Practitioners ? Neurokinetic Therapy®

    Good luck.

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