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  1. #1
    Chris Hansen is offline Senior Member
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    Nov 2008
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    Default Adding movement training?

    As I get older, I find I don't move the way I used to. I don't practice martial arts these days or do some of the things I used to but I'd like to start adding some form of movement training.

    I'm looking for people's ideas of not only what to practice but also how to program it. I have some ideas but it's a work in progress. I think a good start might be things like crawling, basic tumbling, martial arts movement and footwork drills, agility ladder, maybe some yoga.

    If you were to prioritize to get the biggest bang for your buck, what would you place on the top of the list and how would you incorporate it into an existing workout program?

  2. #2
    306pelusa is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Hansen View Post
    As I get older, I find I don't move the way I used to. I don't practice martial arts these days or do some of the things I used to but I'd like to start adding some form of movement training.

    I'm looking for people's ideas of not only what to practice but also how to program it. I have some ideas but it's a work in progress. I think a good start might be things like crawling, basic tumbling, martial arts movement and footwork drills, agility ladder, maybe some yoga.

    If you were to prioritize to get the biggest bang for your buck, what would you place on the top of the list and how would you incorporate it into an existing workout program?
    Movement training is an interesting topic, and one that's finally beginning to win ground thanks to gymnastics strength training, Ido's method, GMB, etc becoming more popular over the more "straight-forward" calisthenics training of decades ago (TNW, CC, YAYOG, etc).

    In terms of programming, I think the usual way to think about it is in 3 different topics. Strength, flexibility and skill/pattern development. If you follow this logic, programming should become easy.

    Strength is incredibly important. Regardless of whatever movement training discipline you use, the best ones seem to have an extensive strength-training components. It is important to be squatting, pressing and pulling to develop strength. Note how vague this is. It doesn't matter if you Pistol, Row or KB Press. As long as the purpose is in strength development, it fits.

    The second part is flexibility/mobility. Again, this is present in all movement systems (GMB's Focused Flexibility, GBodies' integrated mobility, Ido's weighted stretching, etc). You don't have to be a hero and work up to splits, but you should look to spend time improving your flexibility in whatever muscles require it. This will be mostly lower body oriented, but shoulders usually demand some work as well.

    The last step is what you seem most interested in. The skill development/movement training itself. The best way to approach this is to select a discipline you're interested in, and study/apply it. I think Crawling is very good, and with the rise of Animal Flow and Original Strength, there's various resources for adding Crawl work.

    Tumbling is excellent if you have access to the equipment. Yoga/martial arts seem to require TOO MUCH time to learn correctly, so it wouldn't be my first choice. Footwork/agility, etc sounds like an excellent waste of time.

    Essentially what you want is to maintain a component of strength training, some kind of regular flexibility program, and then add on a movement training discipline that makes use of that strength and mobility to create complex movement patterns.

    For the record, I have only recently (about a year) gotten into learning about movement training, so my knowledge is basic. But that seems to be what most people follow. Hope that helps!

  3. #3
    postandspread is offline Senior Member
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    Mar 2011
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    Default

    Games,esp. racquet games like tennis, badminton, squash etc, or just briskly knocking a tennis ball against a wall. But unfortunately these are essentially unilateral in nature. Basketball and volleyball are great and don't have this disadvantage if one consciously avoids favouring any one side over the other.

    Another option is movement in the spirit of MovNat. Even housework works. Who would've thought?!

    Third option is ... dancing. Bboying or other complex styles. You can train speed, agility, balance, multidirectional movement and a fair amount of strength.

    One thing I've noticed is that with ageing one slows down movements which don't need to be slow. This has to be consciously counteracted. Games and dancing help towards this. As does deliberately moving and doing faster.

    Programming-wise, simply incorporate them as and when convenient or desired.
    Last edited by postandspread; 03-14-2017 at 12:59 AM.

  4. #4
    ad5ly is offline Senior Member
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    I would also include kettlebell single leg dead lifts. Also do some balancing drills and jumping rope. Tumbling and controlled fallls. Getting older means greater risk of falling. So these drills may reduce the occurrence of falling and minimise injury ...Dennis

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