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  1. #1
    Milo-Fan is offline Member
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  2. #2
    Milo-Fan is offline Member
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    A rule of thumb: if you have to psyche up for a lift, it's too heavy to be training with.

  3. #3
    Chris Hansen is offline Senior Member
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    Thanks for pointing out that article. I'm a fan of higher frequency. The once per week workouts don't seem to do much for me.

  4. #4
    Milo-Fan is offline Member
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    Coming from a lifetime of HIT dogma its still hard for me to consciously accept M-F dl'ing but it works and a helluva lot better than infrequent pedal to medal balls to the wall training to failure. You can't argue w/ results and daily heavy but never to failure periodization cycle training is superior to HIT. Jones rationalized HIT w/ the formation of a callous but using his own logic of training to failure disproves the "callous formation" theory of muscle growth. If you filed the skin to "failure" you'd file until the skin "failed" or bled and no callous would ever be formed..just scar tissue. Another HIT analogy was getting a suntan. Again using training to failure in this instance tanning to failure would mean getting third degree burns to the point of hospitalization which of course is stupid.

    As PTTP states "heavy but never to failure" stopping at least two reps short of failure is a much higher quality of life and more importantly more effective way to strength train.

    I attempted a "BEAR" this morning and I simply am not built for high volume. I get thicker and larger (but not heavier) through the standard 2 sets of 5 reps PTTP routine so I already know volume is counterproductive for me. Daily or damn near daily 5x week PTTP sensibly cycled is perfect for me...and a helluva lotta others to.
    Last edited by Milo-Fan; 01-06-2018 at 01:54 PM.

  5. #5
    Milo-Fan is offline Member
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    The referenced article brings up a good point not clarified by PTTP. The is a big difference between a HIT training weight and a PTTP a couple of reps short of failure training weight. This would explain years of stagnation I had keeping the "pedal to the metal" for years w/ (0) progress.

  6. #6
    Chris Hansen is offline Senior Member
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    That's kind of a balancing act I've had to figure out. When you workout more frequently, you have to adjust the volume and intensity. Because of some unique challenges I've had, I think the frequent practice approach is the most beneficial approach for me right now.

  7. #7
    Milo-Fan is offline Member
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    My floor press has been stagnated for the past 2 weeks despite pushing w/ damn near everything I've got & in a moment of clarity I was reminded today of how right Pavel was when he stated -

    If ‘training to failure and beyond’ is so hot, how come your bench has been stuck at 185 pounds since Arnold’s first movie?

    I realize now just right Pavel is and how wrong Arthur Jones was when he said "you can't train too intensely". You most certainly CAN train too intensely. I'm sure there are many, many others the world over who can relate to me when I say if I had had PTTP when I first started training I'd be sooo far ahead of where I am today.

    I'm confindent that as HIT contradictory as it sounds I know that by backing off the intensity, i.e., lowering the poundage I'm using I'll progress on far past my current sticking point instead of mindlessly pounding my head against a brick wall by strictly adhering to HIT dogma of training to failure every w/out.

    If I won the lottery I swear I'd buy the rights to PTTP. Pavel has no idea how right he is when he said -



    "A better quality of life is delivered by low rep weight training".

  8. #8
    Milo-Fan is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Hansen View Post
    That's kind of a balancing act I've had to figure out. When you workout more frequently, you have to adjust the volume and intensity. Because of some unique challenges I've had, I think the frequent practice approach is the most beneficial approach for me right now.
    Are you cycling your intensity through periodization? I'm amazed how the CNS can sense increases or decreases in intensity that the conscious mind cannot. As I'm sure you know each cycle should peak higher than the previous one.

  9. #9
    Chris Hansen is offline Senior Member
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    Right now I'm following The Daily Dose Deadlift Plan which has prescribed intensities. I'm still in my first cycle though but it's going well and I'm looking forward to re-testing my 1rm at the end of the program.

  10. #10
    HBDL is offline Junior Member
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    How'd your cycle end up? I think I've finally learned I need three days between w/outs of never going to failure. Classic PTTP.

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