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  1. #11
    GeoffreyLevens is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Hansen View Post
    Macho silliness aside, wouldn't you want your neck to be strong and injury resistant? What if you take a blow or fall and land on your head? Is there a neck strengthener that's safe enough to pass the cost/benefit analysis?
    As I mentioned above, general carryover from other "work". Couple months ago I went down pretty hard on my bicycle. Did not land on my head but whiplash potential was there. I did badly bruise some ribs, thought I had broken something for a day or so but had not. Neck problems as a result=zero. I have also been in a few car crashes and no problems. Maybe lucky, maybe smart???

  2. #12
    GeoffreyLevens is offline Senior Member
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    For a deeper look at this question, consider the following: Do think of life as essentially fraught with danger, bad people out to beat you up and rob you, heavy objects poised to fall on you, disasters about to suddenly emerge at any moment? Or do you view life as essentially benign and supportive, yes supportive of you?

    I've gone both ways with it. For awhile I was on the very dark side of seeing danger at every turn. Part of it was fall out from neurotoxicity of lyme disease but most was self-inflicted from feeding myself a steady diet of scare stories. I very deliberately, like a training program, took on the long task of feeding myself positive news, uplifting stories, hopeful ideas, while rationing but not blocking the dark crapola spewing out of most media most of the time. My life has become MUCH more enjoyable and peaceful and no downside...

  3. #13
    ad5ly is offline Senior Member
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    Its up to each to decide what exercise is an acceptable risk. The op asked a question regarding safety. Knowing the risk going in is accepting that risk. Skydiving is a risk. Tightrope walking is a risk. But with proper training and safety precautions the risk is reduced - but not eliminated. I won't do any of those things. I don't wrestle, sky dive or tightrope walk. For me neck bridges are not an acceptable risk - one bad move and your toast - and so I choose to train the neck with other methods. Kettlebell TGUs for instance. So as to the neck bridges - proceed with safety in mind. And know/accept that risk...Dennis

  4. #14
    Filth Infatuated is offline Junior Member
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    @GeoffreyLevens - The same philosophy can be applied to your training. Is training a hazardous minefield of exercises likely to cripple you if done wrong, or a relatively safe program if done correctly to strengthen your body and build it's resistance to damage?

    Yeah, it's macho silliness, but part of me buys into that. I like to think i'm prepared for most eventualities and the neck training helps me in my Muay Thai specifically, taking hits to the head and doing clinches.

    @ the OP: Again, i'm aware this is just anecdotal evidence, but i've never had a bad neck injury. I haven't injured my neck one iota from training it directly or indirectly since I started doing so. Nor have I had a neck injury from an outside source since, whether this is due to the training or not - I can't say for sure. But in that same time since I started training my neck i've had recurring rotator cuff injuries, tweaked my knees and back, sprained my wrist, had the stirrings of elbow tendonitis and even pulled a rib out of place - all from training.

    The consequences of an injury to the neck may be more severe than an injury to most other body parts - and you can look at this in two ways: As a reason to completely avoid training it, or as a reason to make it an integral part of your program forever. I chose the latter, and i've found it hugely satisfying.

  5. #15
    GeoffreyLevens is offline Senior Member
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    If you're doing Muay Thai then I would think specific neck strengthening would be almost mandatory! That's what I really meant, cost benefit analysis. For me in my life at persent, neck training would be just a waste of time and adding needless risk. Your (everyone's) is critical in deciding what to do or not do.

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